Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"¿Qué le vas a añadir a la sopa?"

Translation:What are you going to add to the soup?

5 years ago

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ScubaDyer

I have been taught that phrases like "a la sopa" should be thought of as "clarifiers" when there is an indirect object, and that the indirect object is ALWAYS needed, while the clarifier is not always needed. I learned this late, and it caused a major hiccup in my learning. If the context is known, no "clarifier" is needed. If there is no context, or if there is a wish for emphasis, then the "clarifier" is needed (or desired). For example: le dí el libro. I gave him the book. That's a complete sentence, but it lacks context. It may be necessary to add "le dí el libro a Juan." But I've been told that I can NEVER omit the indirect object pronoun and simply say.........Dí el libro a Juan. Any comments? It seems a fixed rule, and makes things easier.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Scuba, Sounds like you had a good teacher and learned the lesson well. This grammar point screws up a lot of English speakers learning Spanish. I think it is because we simply have nothing comparable in our language. I have made many comments about it when it has shown up on other DL sentences.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerranLane

Great clarification! Thanks! But... Which verbs need an indirect object?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
  • 17
  • 14
  • 2

Terran, ALL verbs that have an indirect object must put the indirect object pronoun, with an optional "clarifier" which would be a noun or a name. The verbs that absolutely need an IOP are the so-called backwards verbs, gustar, encantar, fascinar, desgustar... eg: Me encanta la gramática. PS: how did you get your 'need' to be in italics?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Llarona

Melita2, I thought I had this straight until I translated "Me encanta la gramática" as "Grammar enchants me," in which case "'me"' is a direct object, not an indirect object. Right? Wrong? Somebody please advise.

Edit: Aha, I think! If the correct translation of the sentence is “Grammar is enchanting TO me” then "'me" is an indirect object.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brilqntin
Brilqntin
  • 24
  • 11
  • 9
  • 291

This was an eye-opener, thank you for the simple and concise explanation, scubadyer!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonD108

I'm confused here. 'Le' in this sentence refers to 'soup'? "You' wouldn't be considered an indirect object, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristina821524
Kristina821524
  • 20
  • 17
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4

Le refers to the soup in this sentence, yes. An indirect object tells you 'to what' or 'to whom' something was done; it is the recipient of the verb's action.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjhatch

It seems difficult to me to remember to use an indirect object in Spanish since 'soup' is not considered an indirect object in the English translation. According to what I learned in English class as a young student, 'soup' is simply the object of the prepositional phrase 'to the soup'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ntennis
Ntennis
  • 22
  • 20
  • 18
  • 2

The indirect object of the verb "add" is "the soup" in the English translation. It occurs in the prepositional phrase "to the soup"; indirect objects in English sometimes need "to" or "for".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRintoul

What does 'le' do here? I wrote "What are you going to add to the soup for him?" and it was counted wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
  • 25
  • 14
  • 3
  • 2001

I assume "le" is short for "a la sopa" here? If two people were already talking about soup then they would understand "le" means the soup and could just drop "a la soup" from the sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRintoul

I think you're right. I've always assumed that the indirect object pronouns were only for people, but there's no grammatical reason they must be. Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
  • 23
  • 156

"le" is and indirect object pronoun meaning "to him/her/it/you"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

I beg to differ with you. "Le is an indirect object but refers not to him or her but to the soup. Turn the sentence around and you get You are going to add what to the soup. "What" is fact the direct object, thus "le" is the indirect object that is clarified by the phrase "a la sopa." IMHO

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
  • 21
  • 12
  • 9
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 220

When droma included "him/her/you" as possible meanings for "le" he was not referring exclusively to this translation, in which "le" refers to the soup. He's giving all possible meanings for "le", depending on the particular sentence. In this case "le" means "it" (soup). In other sentences it could mean "him" or "her" or "you".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
  • 25
  • 4
  • 1282

The IOP "le" takes the place of "la sopa" "it (le)" is the subject of the verb. this sentence asks "what are you adding to 'it' (le)" it, is the soup.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markgjensen

is see minus numbers on jmiker54 comment above/below. if he is wrong let's see an explanation of that corrects his interpretation of, "what are you adding to 'it' (le)" it, is the soup.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patmitarn

Same here

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HectorMart245627

It went from "she is going to suffer" to "being eliminated" to "an ingredient that needs to be added to the soup"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennyChunn1

Yes le is required.. It refers to him/it/her

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raydpratt

Thanks to all of you for this discussion, and especially to those of you who explained that the indirect object pronoun le can also refer to a thing, not just a person. I am sure I have read it a thousand times, but it had not sunk in from actual use and understanding.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jarppis44

I really don't understand why you need the "le" in this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
  • 23
  • 156

"le" is the "indirect object" which, in this sentence, is "a la sopa" The indirect object cannot be omitted. "a la sopa" can be omitted but, in this case, is added for clarification.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Uh, you have a typo in there. Sopa, not soap. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
  • 23
  • 156

thanks. i corrected it.

I HATE AUTOCORRECT

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

but why is it "le" and not "la" if it is referring to the soup? Is it because it is "to" the soup? If the sentence was " you are going to add IT ( to the soup)" would it be "lo vas a anadir"? Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
  • 23
  • 156

jjcthorpe -- The sentence WITHOUT "a la sopa" at the end reads"

What are you going to add "TO IT"

Now to clarify exactly what "TO IT" represents, "a la sopa is tacked on the end of the sentence.

If, for example, "le" represented "salad" the sentence would read:

Qué le vas a añadir a la ensalada.

Your sentence "Lo vas a añadir." Would read:

You are going to add it, and NOT add TO it.

I hope this is not too confusing

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
  • 25
  • 4
  • 1282

The IOP "le" takes the place of "la sopa" "it (le)" is the subject of the verb. this sentence asks "what are you adding to 'it' (le)" it, is the soup

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cryderdougal

Thanks jmiker54, I read through all these comments and understood the concept, but couldn't make the wording make sense until I read your " what are you adding to it"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patmitarn

I have been taught he the use of "le" as an indirect object refers only to "her" and "him"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Then you were taught wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewViceroy

Me too. I was taught, in college even, that le is only for persons and not things. That's what is really confusing me here. But apparently, it's the difference between "adding it" ("la vas a añadir") and "adding TO it" ("le vas a añadir"). The former "la" making it a direct object and the latter "le" making it an indirect object. Whew... this will take some time to relearn now. Damn. I paid good money for those classes too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noperrovieja

To clarify my comment, i was referring to the third person. I'm thinking that me, te and nos are for 1st and 2nd person, yes, or no? And for one last bit of clarification, my word for the day (cómo se dice clarification?), in English you would say "give the book to Juan" OR "give him the book", or "give Juan the book", but in Spanish, if you say "give the book to Juan" you always include the io pronoun. In English, this would translate as "give him the book to Juan" which sounds very confusing. What it comes down to is that it isn't done that way in English, but that it is ALWAYS done that way in Spanish. And we are trying to learn Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/satiricalIrony

I had to redo this one because of a simple grammar mistake. (i said 'ad' instead of 'add'.) :/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allinuse
Allinuse
  • 18
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Can I say "Qué vas a añadir a la sopa"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

No, you must have the indirect object pronoun LE in the sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emoryneely

Read the first and most recommended comment on this thread. It explains it perfectly. 'Sopa' in this sentence is the indirect object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raydpratt

Thank you for making me think about it. The verb añadir would normally expect either an explicit or unstated direct object of something that was to be added to something else. For example, we might ask, "¿Vas a añadir sal?" (Are you going to add salt?") So, part of your question would be in the correct form: "¿Qué vas a añadir?," which asks what direct-object something will be added to something else. In your full sentence, however, "¿Qué vas a añadir a la sopa?," the phrase a la sopa is not a direct object that can be added to something else. Your meaning would be understood in English, and perhaps even in Spanish if the native listener were forgiving, but Spanish apparently otherwise requires the indirect object pronoun le, and only uses the words a la sopa as a clarification.
That said, I believe that the following sentence would be correct without any pronouns: "¿Vas a añadir algo a la sopa?" (Are you going to add something to the soup?)
(If I am guilty of Spanglish, someone else will have to correct me.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango-alpha

Surely "what will you be adding to the soup" should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
  • 25
  • 14
  • 3
  • 2001

Yeah sounds close enough to me try filing a report on it if you see again. "what will you add to the soup" is definitely right here though.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I think your translation is "passive" instead of "active." That being said, I'm not sure how you would make this sentence passive :/ Maybe "¿Qué le se vas a añadir a la sopa?" but that seems screwy to me...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango-alpha

I think that would be, "que se le va a añadir a la sopa," meaning "what will be added to the soup." What will you be adding..." is correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OverlordAndrew

I'm finding this hard to understand too. I was thinking that because 'la sopa' is feminine, i would be using 'la' as the feminine equivalent of 'it' - referring to the soup, inn the same way as I mighty refer to 'her' like this because it's feminine. Obviously I am not understanding something here. So can anyone explain (or send me a link) how and when to use le/la/lo? This would clear up a lot of confusion for me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/verna0612

I am still struggling with this myself, but I think the trick is to see the difference between the direct object and the indirect object. Le is used for indirect objects to me him, her, and it. For direct objects lo is used to mean him or it, and la to. Mean her.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
  • 25
  • 20
  • 11
  • 1401

How can I determine that "la sopa" is an indirect object of añadir and not merely a prepositional object? In any English construction I can imagine that is equivalent to this sentence (even using other verbs), there is no indirect object, but only a prepositional object. (Yes, I understand (1) that qué is the direct object and that there's no way that la sopa is the direct object, (2) that things are different in Spanish, and (3) that the clitic pronoun is required for an indirect object. I have formally studied Spanish for 10 years and hold a university minor.) Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swindle1951

Why say "Que le vas a anadir a la sopa?" And not "Que lo vas a anadir a la sopa?" Explain the need for lo or le PLEASE!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swindle1951

Ok, I understand now that le lo or la mean it and applies to the soup. Why then can't you use la for sopa, i.e. "Que la vas a anadir a la sopa." ????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mawill14

Isn't the indirect object "te" not "le"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgneyaTurl

Why not "en la sopa"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertn
hertn
  • 14
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

Why le and not la, as sopa is feminine?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffLucco

I just can't wrap my head aroud the "le", "lo", "te", etc. What they mean and how to use them. Is there a way to remember this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam247727

Anyome tell me what the difference is between lo and le??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noperrovieja

I don't have my direct object/indirect object Spanish cheat sheet in front of me, so just for clarification, are le/les the only pronouns used for indirect objects in Spanish, regardless of sex, and direct objects use lo, la for masc., fem. DOs? In English we would say to (or for) him, her and not to she or to he

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sallynelme

Za saw

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaireJentsch

Sorry but I need clarification. I translated this to: What are you going to add to the soup for him? I think dir. obj is soup and indirect le. If one wants to emphasize soup why not Qué LA vas a añadir a la soup? So if John wants another vegetable in soup, the one could ask Qué LE vas a añadir a la soup. Am I asking clearly? My computer will not type s-o-p-a together as it turns it into soap.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/studencio

'You are going to add "what" to the soup'. For me, 'what' is the direct object and 'the soup' is the indirect object. 'Le' refers to the soup. ¿Tengo razón?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arbalest3
Arbalest3
  • 23
  • 10
  • 9
  • 310

'What are you going to add to the soup?' -- accepted. ('le' is not required here) -- A perfect example of where Duolingo need to step in and clarify context and meaning.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yairrada

will 'lo' instead of 'le' will be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
  • 17
  • 14
  • 2

I hope not, as 'lo' is incorrect.

3 years ago