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  5. "Der Mann ist frei."

"Der Mann ist frei."

Translation:The man is free.

July 22, 2013

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mel08b

Does this also mean "the man is single"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prochat

That would just be Der Mann ist Single, and it is in this case actually a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ussa10

You could say "Er ist wieder frei", which means he split up with his girlfriend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skids03

Just so everyone knows, kostenlos means: it COSTS nothing. Frei means: free (not a slave or prisoner).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prochat

...and kostenfrei is free of expense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MIguelMata91

Can it also mean "free" as in "not busy"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omidrey

it's strange in english, what exactly "the man is free?" means?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gorn61

It means he is free, unfettered, unconstrained. For example, he is not a slave, or is not a prisoner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn115916

Less extreme than that it could also just mean he isn't busy or that he has free time to use however he wishes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MickieEzz

So the man was either in jail, being held captive or a slave? Or maybe he finally decided to finally be the person he wants to be. I like that one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrishHM

Or he is not busy like 'the man is free he is off work'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xievoueeeer

rofl I thought kostenlos meant free... what is this then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

kostenlos = free as in free of charge

frei = free as in freedom, sometimes as in free of charge


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LAbbeyW

i remember it as frei- like the salves are FREI, and kostenlos-it KOSTS nothing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheJaffe

Los- less. As in it is Kost-(less), or childless (kinderlos), godless (Gottlos), harmless (schadlos)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seanathon23

Can this sentence mean both "the man is free" as in his legal status and also that he has free time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrienneOrlando

Again, I'm not a native German speaker, but I think to say "he has free time" you would use "Er hat Freizeit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoiDs

I also have same doubt. Someone clarify


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrienneOrlando

See Mickie Ezra's comment. I am not a native German speaker, but I believe it can mean either that he's legally free (not enslaved or jailed) or that he is free in the sense of feeling free to be himself, not inhibited by other people's opinions or criticism of him.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AseemKumar

What is the rule for having silent "r" in a lot of words such as Frau, Frei, Frühstück, Freundin, etc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

It's not silent. It's basically the same sound you produce when gargling.

http://www.pauljoycegerman.co.uk/pronounce/consonr.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AseemKumar

I checked up a number of websites and nowhere do I hear an "r" sound of any kind. Maybe the laptop speakers aren't good or my ears gone bad :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

If you are expecting to hear an English R, you won’t hear it. German R and English R are different sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

I can hear it very clearly. Try using headphones.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AseemKumar

Had tried with headphones as well. Looks like I need an offline teacher.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iul1

This is an r sound that you say like when you're trying to clear your throat. You may not hear it because it sounds like a rough hhh or something, and I also think it blends in to the sounds before and after it, it's like the r in French, like when you try to say the word French "France" actually in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan178900

non of those words have a silent r


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/comradebertha

Can it also mean "free" as in someone is giving away a slave for free


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SayantanDu4

Why do i keep hearing Der Mann 'leist' Frei instead of Der mann ist Frei. Is anyone facing the same issue?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaturnLearning

Why is "the man is available" not accepted? When you hover over the word "frei" one of the definitions in English is "available"? If that is not accurate, it should be removed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

That's not how dictionaries work. Not all translations work in every context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaturnLearning

But there is no context in this case...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The context is that we're talking about a person. "frei" does not mean "available" when talking about people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

What would the word be? (I'm considering 'available' to mean 'not busy'.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiyalka2

Actually, available would be possible. For instance, if you are waiting to get your hair or your nails done, and then a male employee gets available and someone points at thim: "Gucken Sie mal, der Mann da hinten ist frei."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaturnLearning

Am I missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nupur891781

How does the meaning of the sentence change when it's "Der man habe frei" rather than "Der mann ist frei"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Der man habe frei does not mean anything in German.

Der Mann habe frei means something like "May the man have some free time" or "(I've heard that) the man has some time off from work".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becky332188

The recording is not clear also the others on this level


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SerdarEgemen

"the man is vacant" was a wrong translation according to duo. why ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What do you think "vacant" means?

I've usually seen it used to mean "empty", e.g. "a vacant room". It's not a word that easily applies to people, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustALittleEdgy

There's my chance xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leelanders

"Der Mann" is also translated as "the husband". Why such an answer is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Mann means "husband" only in a possessive context, e.g. mein Mann = "my husband".

Just der Mann on its own would not mean "the husband" but only "the man".

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