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"Ellos habían ido a la elección."

Translation:They had gone to the election.

5 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

We would never have this sentence. It would have been we have gone to the polls. How in the devil to you go to an election. This is a BS sentence!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

That may be true for public office elections, and it's a good point - assuming that indeed we are understanding "elección" correctly here. I'd ask a native Spanish speaker for that input.

But there are also other kinds of "elections" where no "polls" are involved. Events involving electing board members for an organization or officers at a school are two examples that immediately strike me. For these, the English sentence is at least passable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Lets downvote the silly translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Is "They had gone to the polls," an accepted translation? I didn't try it, b/c the hover hints didn't seem to suggest it would work, but I agree, that would make a lot more sense in English. And it does seem like that's what the Spanish sentence actually means...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
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That's what I put, because I could not think of anything else to put, but it was incorrect. 7/11/14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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las urnas = polls

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I'm pretty sure that this varies significantly by local dialect. See: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english-spanish/poll http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=poll

They show elleciones, votación, and urnas all as being valid for "polls" in the sense we're discussing here. Also encuesta and sondeo, but I think these last two are the kind of poll that opinion pollsters take, not an actual binding election.

It's possible that to get an idiomatic translation of "They had gone to the polls," you'd need, "Han ido a las elecciones." Which would make only "to the election," valid for "a la elección."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesw0906

Agreed. You just don't use sentences like this since they basically don't make sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"election" is the process not a place. So yes, this is a colloquialism - and a rather lazy one.
We might say "election meeting" for a non-political gathering (of a club or other social organisation).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/warrio1010
warrio1010
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Not relevant to this particular sentence but are the verb conjugations always the same in past perfect and present perfect and the only change is habian/habiamos and han/hemos etc. before the verb?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

yep the past participle stays the same

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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There are 7 different perfect tenses to be specific, and accordingly, 7 different simple tenses. To make a perfect tense, put "haber" in the simple tense you wish to use, and then follow it with the past participle of the verb you're trying to say. Past participle never changes, even in a perfect infinitive or perfect participle (like "haber ido"—to have gone, or "habiendo ido"—having gone).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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"They had gone to the election" makes no sense as an English translation of this spanish phrase... The intended translation should presumably be "they had gone to the polls"... but i wasn't brave enough to enter that so don't know if it worked.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Probably it means "they had gone to vote".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I'd wager that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
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Where does one go to vote? To the elections or to the polls?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"polling center" (en los Estados Unidos)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"polling station" in many places including the UK.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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Would "They had been to the election" (been vs gone) be an acceptable translation? And if not, how would you say that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

If what you're trying to describe a situation in which they had gone to the polls, and then gone somewhere else (and hence, at the point at which you are speaking, they had been to the polls), you're still going to just use ido, and the nature of your intent will be clear from the surrounding context.

I guess you also could say: Ellos habían estado a la elección. They had been at the polls.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CARUSO68

The only logical sense to this sentence is like saying ''they had gone to the parade''

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMcV1
CMcV1
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can any native spanish speaking person can say if "eleccion" in its singular form reffers to elections such as elections for presedency?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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We definitely need a native speaker on this one ...

Just a note here, SpanishDict.com says " acudir a las urnas" is the way to say "to go to the polls."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cadams4880

This is not a sentence in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fredricksonjim

I put "They would have gone to the election" and I was marked wrong. Why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evi_Anguelova

I think it should be "They had been to the election" because as far as I know, "gone" is when you go and don't come back and "been" is when you go and come back (like go shopping, because you won't get lost in the store and never come back, right?)

1 month ago