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"Me voy a recuperar."

Translation:I am going to recover.

5 years ago

120 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MoggyNumNum

How then would you say, "I will recover myself" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The sentence means "I will recover myself" simply by being a reflexive verb. We don't, however, translate it this way. Sentence could just as well have been written "Voy a recuperarme." (Literally, I am going to recuperate myself.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl
GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl
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We don't really say that in English, unless we say "by myself". The intent here in Spanish is simply in English, "I will recover (e.g. from the surgery)" versus " I will recover the lost treasure."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tumler100

"I will recover myself" isn't this another way of saying "I will pull myself together"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roman2095
roman2095
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No, you would not say that. I cannot think of anywhere that you would say "I will recover myself"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

Correct, Because "recover" when used as an intransitive is reflexive (he will recover etc) and implies self so you are saying in effect "he will recover himself himself (we are not including "himself (by himself). You could end up with, in effect " i will recover my self myself myself---the redundancy of the first two is obviously wrong. When used as a transitive this is not reflexive as in "i recover the family fortunes dollar by dollar"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arnobashtar15

Exactly what I put down.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

I belive it would be "Me voy a recuperar a mi misma" But Im not 100% sure.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianJessen

Isn't "I will get better" just as fitting in English as "I am going to recover"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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Reported, 1 May 2015.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marguandre
marguandre
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Reported 8/8/16

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StabbySteph

Same problem July 2016

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hop_juice

reported 5/17

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mimi.hodson

reported july 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/delmoralwilson

Yes! "I will get better" has other meanings, but it's the best translation of "Me voy a recuperar. I never use or hear "I'm going to recuperate" in everyday speech.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

But this is not a course in English and its usage, so it does noit matter what anyone never hears.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/richbrownie

I have seen you pop up on a lot of the discussion threads and felt I had to commend you for quite rightly, on more than one occasion, pointing out to people the purpose of what this course is trying to help people achieve. I really don't get why some people must insist on trying to shoehorn every possible variation of a phrase or sentence into being accepted as a correct translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinB3

Duolingo consistently emphasizes the most "natural" translation from one language to another. Duolingo asked me to translate this to English (me voy a recuperar). So the English does matter here -- you can't really be asked to translate a phrase, ignoring one of the languages involved.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abenid

no because they may not mean the same thing. me voy a recuperar would specifically be talking about recuperating. but if you said i will get better, the question/preceding comment could have been: why do you suck so bad? your answer wouldn't be: me voy a recuperar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elyxr01
Elyxr01
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I think what's important is that it works in English. Yes, discretion is needed when translating to Spanish, but the fact of the matter is if one responds "I am going to get better" in English after being asked "What did the doctor say?", then their context is understood. The English translation should be accepted as "I am going to get better".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

We are studying the Spanish verb, "recuperar" here and it does not mean, "get better." It means, to "recover." It has to do with "recuperating." These are very different ideas from "get better." Getting better but concerns the idea of improvement and does not include the idea of a full return to normal.

Additional translations for "recuperar" are: get it back

Verb: recover, retrieve, regain, reclaim, recoup, recuperate, get back, make up for

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Still, I see Duolingo is using the Spanish verb, "recuperar," in its sentence and not "recuperarse."

Tesbee's excellent explanation states otherwise, and Roger is also correct. The pronominal verb "Recuperarse" is being used in this sentence.

"Recuperar" is a transitive verb, which requires an object, and means "to recover [object]."

"Recuperarse" is a pronominal verb, which does not require an object, and means "to recover."

The "se" ending, as Tesbee pointed out, must match the subject, so it becomes "me" in this case.

As Tesbee also observed, this ending can be "cut off" and placed before the infinitive form of the verb.

This means both "Me voy a recuperar" and "Voy a recuperarme" are valid, as Talca has noted.

It is a good idea to keep an eye out for pronominal verbs whenever "se/me/te" pops up. They are listed in dictionaries such as SpanishDict's as the infinitive+se and have their own definitions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Why, thank you, Jellonz (for post below). But those examples aren't mine; they were lifted from spanishdict. :D
(Yeah, me and my plagiarizing fool self.)

Also, just to clarify, my message to Eugene said that the "se" may be placed "in front of the first verb". ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

That explaintion was so appreciated by me who was unsure about mi and me tx

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Thanks

Basically, I was going by the sentence shown as the correct answer at the top of this page..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Except the relevant verb in the example isn't recuperar, it is recuperarse.
But otherwise, what you say is correct: recuperarse translates to recover, recuperate, return to normal. As you say, get better is not an appropriate translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Doesn't "me" go with "recuperar" to make it pronomial?
As Talca says above, "Voy a recuperarme" is a valid alternative.

Down the page you'll see rspreng's related comment of two years ago.

March 2018 Edit: Better late than never. In the first paragraph I wrongly used "reflexive". I have changed it to the correct term "pronomial".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

tessbee saw what I said just above and clued me in about the matter on my profile page. Since everyone's profile page is public I am going to reproduce what shevtold me, here, in the following.

.... saw a post of yours, so this is just a heads-up: Reflexive verbs are actually treated as separate from their normal sisters. Their infinitive forms have the ending of "se", and they are listed as individual verbs in the Spanish verbs list. When they are used in a sentence, one way of using them is to cut off the "se" part, conjugate it according to subject, then place them directly in front of the first verb in the sentence. So this "se" becomes "me" if the subject is Yo; it becomes "te" if it's Tú; "se" if Él/Ella/Ud.; "nos" if Nosotros; and "se" if Ellos/Ellas/Uds. // Further, when these verbs are in their Infinitive forms they are called by their forms as is - with the "se" still attached to their end. The verb in question in the discussion is, indeed, "recuperarSE" and not "recuperar". And not just because a verb has a "se" at the end the English translation must always also have a "myself", "himself", etc. The Spanish sentence on this discussion page is a good example for what I'm trying to say. "Me voy a recuperar" is just "I'm going to recover" and not "I'm going to recover myself" like the other commenters say. Our the verb "lavarse" is different form it's normal sister "lavar". "Lavar" is "to wash" and "lavarse" is "to wash up".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Hmm? What "example" are you referring to which shows "recuperarse?"

The verb in the Duolingo Spanish sentence is, " "recuperar. "

"Recuperarse" is the infinitive, "recuperar," with "se" added on the end, which means, "oneself." It is the same verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Still, I see Duolingo is using the Spanish verb, "recuperar," in its sentence and not "recuperarse."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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"Basically, I was going by the sentence shown as the correct answer at the top of this page.."

Eugene - Maybe these examples could clarify further for you:

Recuperarse (Infinitive form):
[a1] Cuando María se recuperó, no recordaba nada.
(When Maria recovered, she could not remember anything.) NOTE: The English translation here does not say "recover herself" -- "recover" here is intransitive, meaning, it does not take an object (also applies to the example sentence in "[b1]") -- Maria is not recovering anything. She is recovering, period. She is recuperating.

[b1] Cuando me recuperé, no recordaba nada.
(When I recovered, I could not remember anything.)

Recuperar (Infinitive form):
[a2] La policía recuperó las joyas robadas.
(The police recovered the stolen jewels.) NOTE: The English translation here says "recover the stolen jewels". "Recover" here is Transitive -- it does take an object. (Also applies to the example sentence in "[b2]")

[b2] Maria no recuperó su bolsa robada.
(Maria did not recover her stolen purse.)

The verb used by Duolingo here is not "recuperar"; it's really "recuperarse".

"Here is what I see at the top of the page, below Do you see something different?

"Me voy a recuperar."

Traduccion: I am going to recover.

Right. And I can see there is no "myself" anywhere in the English translation, and that's because there shouldn't be. And yes, actually, I do see something (at least I should): It's that the verb "recuperarse is what's at work here. It's just as when we 'see' (we know) that, for example, in the sentence "Voy a comer" the "voy" is "ir": we don't in reality see with our own eyes the written word "ir", but we know that that "ir" has been conjugated into a "voy". That's basically what happened to the "recuperarse" in our sentence here--"Me [voy a] recuperar"/"Voy a recuperarme". The infinitive: recuperarse. That is, the se of "recuperarse" has been cut off and placed at the beginning of the sentence: se turned into Me.

Duolingo: Me voy a recuperar
Traducción: I'm going to recover.
(Recuperarse = the infinitive form)
(Recuperarme/me… recuperar = the conjugated form of the ending se for "[Yo] Voy a"

There is no "myself" here. Just seeing "recuperarme" or "me voy a…" doesn't always mean we need to stick a "myself" in the English sentence. "I'm going to recover myself" doesn't mean much/anything, unless you lost your self (whatever that means; your physical self, I guess) and are going to find/recover it later.

Recuperarse (This is the English Intransitive verb "recover"/"recuperate")
Me voy a recuperar. / Voy a recuperarme. (For Yo) = "I'm going to recover" (from being in a bad state).

Te vas a recuperar. / Vas a recuperarte. (For ) = You're going to recover (from being in a bad state).

Se va a recuperar. / Va a recuperarse. (For Él/Ella/Usted) = He/She is//You are going to recover (from being in a bad state).

Se van a recuperar. / Van a recuperarse. (For Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes = They/You are going to recover (from being in a bad state).

Nos vamos a recuperar./Vamos a recuperarnos. (For Nosotros/as) = We're going to recover (from being in a bad state).

There is no 'myself', 'yourself', 'himself'/'herself', 'themselves'/'yourselves', or 'ourselves' here.

Recuperar (This is the English Transitive verb "recover"--it does not mean "recover" as in "recuperate"; it does mean to reacquire something that has been lost.)
Voy a recuperar [algo que he perdido]. = I'm going to recover [something I've lost]

Vas a recuperar [algo que has perdido]. = You're going to recover [something you've lost].
Etc.

You can see that with "recuperar" (not recuperarse), an object is needed--the object that someone is recovering/reacquiring.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Great examples Tessbee. For Eugene, as Roger says, "there are often several ways to say the same thing in Spanish": "Me voy a recuperar" and "Voy a recuperarme" are saying exactly the same thing, and "recuperarme" is just the form of "recuperarse" that matches this sentence's subject.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Here is what I see at the top of the page, below Do you see something different?

"Me voy a recuperar."

Traduccion: I am going to recover.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Hey, calm down ET. We're only trying to help. Just like in English, there are often several ways to say the same thing in Spanish (even though DL doesn't list everything).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attanatta
attanatta
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Reported 16.10.2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellzington

Same December 2016

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BWehr
BWehr
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If you are talking about recovery from an illness, we usually say that we are "going to get better." We rarely say we are going to "recuperate" or "recover" unless we are talking about a prolonged, serious illness.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

But what we say in English whether rarely or otherwise is secondary to what the Spanish sentence is saying. And what is the Spanish sentence saying? I mean, what does the Spanish sentence mean?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinB3

Duolingo asked me to translate to English -- so this does matter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

That matters as far as not dinging out in regard what you type is concerned, But what matters more is what goes on within your head. You understand do you not that no Spanish verb has a direct translation to English, right? That means, understandihg what the Spanish words mean without consideration of English is the most important thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Not necessarily. When someone has been in an accident and friend visits him or her in the hospital that friend might ask, "Are you going to be all right?" And accident victim might say, "Yes. The doctors tell me I will recover." He or she might also say, "Yes, I am expected to make a full recovery."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attanatta
attanatta
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I agree with you. I was counted wrong for this, so I'm reporting it.

16.10.2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acosbey

still marked wrong at 23.11.2015

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Just reading this again because it is so pertinent. I just had double knee replacement with near death in the intensive care unit. So just let me say, "Me voy a recuperar." Now have said it I just have to do it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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¿Doble? Speedy recovery. Muy rápido, por favor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Gracias senor, El dolor es solo una ilusion. Pero una ilusion muy fuerte.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inder.singh

That's the spirit!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Tiempo ha pasado y ahorra no tengo dolor, pero el tigre corre mas rapido que yo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paddlecosta

can "me" be left out of this sentence?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

nope - the 'me' tells us that the verb is recuperarse and that you are recovering (as from an illness) rather than just regaining a lost object, etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sanjay182

Thank you for that explanation!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Rspreng, ... or recovering la sofa! XD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barnsy

Voy a recuperarme ???

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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100% correcto.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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oh, those blessed #$&* reflexives...

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

Sí, as I understand it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrandra

Can't "recuperar" also mean "get better"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

No.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mroczk
Mroczk
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"I am going to get better." Marked wrong by DL 20/4/2014. It's common usage in English & should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

"I am going to get better" is, "Voy a mejorar."

See the difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Whoever down voted me, wake up and face reality.

"I am going to get better" is, "Voy a mejorar." And the latter can also be translated as, "I am going to improve." And neither concerns recovery. Just beneficial progress.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jakerosen
jakerosen
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Has anyone noticed that one of the hints under "Me" says "I had a jacket made" ? Can anyone explain ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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hallucinogens?? lol

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blairman23

Could "recuperar" mean to recuperate?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attanatta
attanatta
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Recuperar = recover a lost object

Recupararse = recover/recuperate

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RicardoVerde1

I see many English translations here except the one that is most natural to me for short term sickness, which is "I am going to get well." But Duolingo does not accept it. Some responses indicate we seldom say recuperate, but for longer term illness that is most natural to me. Perhaps this is regional. I am from New Orleans. But I am amazed that "get well" is not accepted when "get better" is!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

why not "Yo voy a recuperar"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Because that would be "I'm going to recover [something]". (And I think it might even be ungrammatical without an object. I always have trouble remembering which verbs are obligatory transitive.) To talk about recovering or recuperating from an illness, you need the reflexive form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"Yo me voy a recuperear" but you have to get the reflexive pronoun in there!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Talca/aurosharman-Thanks for the reminder. It's finally starting to make sense. My biggest headache now seems to be ir vs irse

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas268453

I am going to get well. That didn't work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogernj
rogernj
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neither did "I am going to get better."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Then you have learned something, right?

Out of the ball park experimentation can pay off when you dig out. It is educational.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyLamarc
CodyLamarc
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Recuperate, am i the only one that cares

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MysticWysteria

Is the "me" required, or can it be left out to be simply "voy a recuperar"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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Yes, "me" is required because "to recover from an illness or the like" is "recuperarse".

"Recuperar", on its own, means "to recover a lost object".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

why put 'me' in there?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Because the verb being used is "recuperarSE" and the grammatical subject is "Yo. Then the se part of the infinitive "recuperarSE" is removed, changed into ME to match the subject "Yo", which in turn becomes "[Yo] voy a recuperarme", OR is placed before the first/conjugated verb (which is "voy"), which in turn becomes "Me voy a recuperar".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

También puedes decir: " (yo) "voy a recuperarme"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vickiewill2

Why do you use "Me voy" instead of just Voy? Wouldn't "Voy a recuperar" mean I am going to recover without the "me"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Vickiewill2 - I wish you'd read the many comments above that explained the "me" in this case. But let me try to answer it here (and I hope it won't be confusing.) There are two kinds of this verb: recuperar and recuperarSE.

  1. Recuperar means to recover [an object] (a stolen car; a lost luggage; lost keys; etc.)

  2. RecuperarSE means to recover [from illness]/to recuperate
    (This is the verb that we are using on this page.)

-- Voy a recuperar ("I'm going to recover … [what?])" is not complete; you need to complete the sentence with the 'something' that you are going to recover. (Here, you are using the verb #1.)

-- ME voy a recuperar/Voy a recuperarME ("I'm going to recover.") is a complete sentence and means you're going to recover (from illness, for example)/you're going to recuperate. (Here, you are using the verb #2.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coffeymcc

Why is "I'm going to recover" marked incorrect?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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It shouldn't be. Yours is perfectly fine. Hope you reported it.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VictorGold8

Could not understand this as the male voice cannot be heard slower like the female voice.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neil936140

This says im going to recover?? Isnt "I will recover" Yo recuperré?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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You are on the right lines NeilWillia20. Strictly "I will recover" is "Me recuperé"  or "Yo me recuperé" . (It uses the pronomial version.)

It is a common and persistent error in English that "I am going to..." is equivalent to "I will..."; it isn't.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Minor typo; recuperaré is the future form.

Some irregular verbs do shorten the infinitive (e.g., haber - habré) before adding the relevant future inflections, but recuperar is not one of them. You probably know all that, but others may not.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

I thought "me voy" meant " I'm leaving"........but because recuperar is a reflexive verb it now means "I'm going"?? ......ok, I guess it's just something you have to remember...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

"Voy a" is different than "voy." "Voy a" means "I am going to (do something)." In this case the "do" is "recuperate."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1gnaci0
1gnaci0
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why not "I am going to recover myself" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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You need to include "me" in Spanish but you don't say it like that in English.

However, I must be getting used to DL dropping in the odd weird English sentence, so I too put myself (quite aware that it didn't sound right), WRONG!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeTracy

Why can you not say: I am going to recuperate?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You can say that.

And if you you dinged out why didn't you report it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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On the fast track it sounds like 'LE voy...' not 'ME voy...'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidheiser

Could this not be answered without the "me" as "Voy a recuperar?" It seems to me that the translation should have "myself" at the end, if we have "me" in front.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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See the dictionary HERE.
In Spanish the pronomial version of a verb frequently doesn't just mean I did something to myself  (and sometimes it can relate to an entirely different action). In this example, recuperarse is not the same as recuperar.

March 2018 Edit: "reflexive" changed to "pronomial".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doktacee
doktacee
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Still not accepting "get better" for "recover" 2/21/16

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Think of the difference between just getting somewhat and making a full recovery. These are two very different situations. One idea goes the full mile and the other just somewhere along the way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMitche3

why not yo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Instead of, or as well as, "me"?

"Yo me voy a recuperar" should be fine, although the "yo" is redundant.

"Yo voy a recuperar" makes no sense because in this sentence "recuperar" is transitive and requires an object. It's like saying "I am going to recover ..."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the3lusive
the3lusive
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There is no need to use "yo", because we can tell who it is referring to in the conjugated verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonysauma

I am going to get better should be accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IWannaLearn3
IWannaLearn3
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Is me optional?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Nope. Please see comments above.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

why not " voy a recuperar"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

The short answer is that recuperar is transitive and needs an object. To recover from some implied state uses the pronominal form recuperarse.

For more information, check out other comments.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginagillen
ginagillen
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why is se not required as it was in a similar sentence a few sentences ago?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iCorbacho

"recuperate"? seriously DL?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

That is what the Spanish word means.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melissa554

How is this sentence wrong if It means the Same thing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

But it does not mean the same thing, and that is why it is wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silvanarochford

Why is "I am going to get better" non accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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It seems that Eugene is right and we who think that is a natural answer are wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Look back up the page and read EugeneTiffany's explanation why "get better" is wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pasoem

I will i will survive! As long as I know how to live I know ill.... ( who can fill in the blank?!?)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jebb500

Should it be "voy a recuperar"? The sentence is not telling to recover oneself.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Please read the other comments.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkPustam
MarkPustam
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Can this be translated as "I am going to heal myself"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sgtROCK1

couldn't you omit the "me"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vlid0o

In your face, STDs !

2 years ago