"His family has suffered a great loss."

Translation:Su familia ha sufrido una gran pérdida.

5 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ahsonwardak

Why is it una gran perdida versus perdida grande?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

gran before noun = great (as in meaningful, having much influence) and grande after = large, big (as in physical size)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdb614

Before noun indicates a subjective adjective while after indicates more of a factual adjective.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rm7637
rm7637
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Why is it "ha" not "han"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Same as in English, family is a collective noun that takes a singular verb in Spanish and in NA English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alsweetex
Alsweetex
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It's slightly confusing for me as well because in England I would always say: "the family have" instead of "the family has". It's not too bad to get used to this though, in Spanish and American English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why is HA SUFRIDO not reflexive? Ex "...se ha sufrido..." Isnt the above sentence written in the passive voice? Why am i wrong? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllisonSch1

Well, this is a bit different than passive. Passive: The widgets were tested. Active: (He?) tested the widgets. In passive voice, the actor isn't specified.

Here, we're using the present perfect tense, with a subject and a direct object. So, the family is the subject (who has suffered? ), and the great loss is the object (the family has suffered what?)

The reflexive only kicks in when the subject and object are the same - for example, he washes himself is se lava.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GalenBarne

Thought gran only goes before masculine nouns.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GardenessG

Perdida or perdido - how can I tell when to use which? The sentence was "His family..." so I answered with "perdido" and lost a heart. I thought perdida would be feminine related.

4 years ago

[deactivated user]

    Here, pérdida (with an accent!) is being used as a noun, and it is feminine. So the correct answer is una gran pérdida. It has nothing to do with the word familia.

    The forms you are thinking of, perdido/perdida, do not have accents and are used as verbs or adjectives. For example 'Estoy perdido/perdida.' Here it functions as an adjective, and you choose the form based on whether you are male (perdido) or female (perdida).

    So bottom line, pérdida WITH an accent is a feminine NOUN, and means 'loss.' Perdido/perdida WITHOUT an accent are adjectives and mean 'lost.' Only when you're using them as an adjective do you have to worry about choosing a gender based on context.

    Hope this helps and good luck!

    EditDelete4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
    FLchick
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    AdrianAndr I totally thought it was pérdida because it is referencing the loss of la familia.

    4 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      FLChick, I'm not too sure what you're asking, but the fact that familia is feminine and pérdida is also feminine is pure coincidence. You could replace "una gran perdida" with "un gran accidente," (which is masculine) and the sentence would still be grammatical.

      EditDelete4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
      FLchick
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      I was just commenting on why I chose pérdida on a hunch. Now I know why to use it in the future

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/MyNameDoesntFi

      Why can't you put han??

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/sdb614

      "Family" is singular. Like "la gente" not "las gente."

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/dtturman
      dtturman
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      When do you use "ha" and when do you use "hay"

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
      Raahiba
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      'Ha' is equivalent to the English auxiliary verb 'has' ('the family has suffered'). 'Hay' is 'there is/there are', as in 'hay mucha gente' ('there are a lot of people').

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/trees28

      I agree with GalenBarne. It was my understanding that grande was only shortened before masculine nouns, similar to uno/un. can all preceding adjectives be shortened for both feminine and masculine nouns?

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

      AdrianAndr, Ahora, yo entiendo "pérdida". Gracias por su explicación. Voy a dar ud. un lingot. Bien hecho.

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/MaryIrvine

      Interesting that I got marked wrong for leaving the accent off of pérdida - I guess because the sentence is ambiguous without it

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
      Raahiba
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      Without the accent it would say 'His family has suffered a great lost'. I'm surprised that DL is beginning to notice accents though - maybe because we're getting to a higher level.

      4 years ago
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