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"Oíche Shamhna."

Translation:Hallowe'en.

3 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Why is Hallowe'en spelled with that apostrophe

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Collar85
Collar85
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In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, All Hallows' Even evolved into Halloween. [Wikipedia]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Yes, but is there a region where the e'en spelling is favoured, because as far as I know neither the English nor the Americans would spell it with the additional punctuation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sylvain2015
Sylvain2015
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Up until fairly recently, Hallowe'en was the accepted spelling of the word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Collar85
Collar85
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That I don't know. It must be used somewhere if the course creators felt the need to include it. But you're right, it fell out of favour in most places in the early to mid-1900s.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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It's fairly common with the apostrophe in Ireland

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I've always spelt it Hallowe'en. It always looks wrong to me without the apostrophe, but then I was born in the early '50s so perhaps my spelling is a bit old fashioned: e'en = even(ing), and you need the apostrophe to mark the contraction (or, at least, I do).

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverTorm

Yes really odd spelling. Never seen this before.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TiarnnMill

It is what we're taught in school in Ireland

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Is the (pagan/celtic) Samhain festival the precursor of Halloween?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

Yes. According to celtic/pagan tradition, it is one of the two nights a year where the barriers between the spirit world and our own broke down allowing passage between the two. The other is Bealtain.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Was it specifically an Irish holiday, or a Celtic (or pagan idk the exact terminology) holiday celebrated by other Celtic countries/settlements in the region ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesusCouto
JesusCouto
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In Galicia we used to celebrate it too. In some places is still celebrated (Véspera de Santos, festa das cabazas, festa dos calacús...).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Galicia, Spain interesting :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steven711691

Not exactly. The celebration may be similar, but Halloween is a Catholic holiday, and was celebrated in many places in Europe; not just the Isles.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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I'm aware that it's now practiced as a result of exposure to the American holiday, but where was Hallowe'en traditionally celebrated in continental Europe, outside of Brittany? I'm curious and don't know the answer (not trying to catch you out).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/B-mhongoadh

Also, Samhain was an important festival, being the climax of the harvest, and therefore, of the agricultural year. It was, like many festival appropriated by the church who, because of the association with the departed, made it all souls day. When the Spanish colonised America they changed the date of the 'Day of the Dead' to match - so it's a weird bit of second hand Celtic imperialism - but I guess they got us back with the potato.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robbinorion
robbinorion
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I wonder if the Irish have a problem with all these people calling themselves "Wiccans" or "witches" celebrating their holiday.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmeraldBear
EmeraldBear
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Is "Sh" pronounced like in English or is it an aspirated s?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiachra691900
Fiachra691900
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Like a regular h, gh being slightly aspirated, and ch more heavily so. . . if I'm not mistaken ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmeraldBear
EmeraldBear
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OK thank you :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Like h in house or aha

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZanninaMargariti

Why lenition after oiche?? Is it translated as night of Halloween??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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The literal translation would be "night of Samhain". The Gaelic festival of Samhain ran for 24 hours from sunset on 31 October until sunset on 1 November. So Oíche Shamhna was the night-time part, and was followed by Lá Samhna the following morning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZanninaMargariti

Yes but lenition after oiche is because of Genitiv?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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Yes, it is because of the genitive, but also because it follows a feminine word. Oíche is feminine, so a genitive based on oíche will be lenited where possible. Compare Lá Samhna - is masculine, so it does not cause lenition in the genitive that follows it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott299837

On the show Supernatural, Sam Hain is a demon that came out on Halloween. Guess I know where they got the name from now XD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerryOFarr

All souls day in Irish tradition.

8 months ago