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"Me quedaré tres noches."

Translation:I will stay three nights.

5 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vonKraush

I wrote 'i will stay FOR three nights,' that means the exact same thing. Duolingo seems more bugged than usual in this chapter

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

I suspect fewer people have made it this far down the tree (up the tree?). Between those who dropped out before they got this far and those who haven't gotten here yet, there is a much smaller crowd to crowd-source this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr-Pen
Dr-Pen
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I second that. The good thing is that I've been receiving emails from Duolingo about accepting my corrections for some of their translations so be patient and this may be fixed.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
Perseph1955
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So have I. Keep reporting. Not only does DL improve, but lots of learning comes from thinking through the subtleties of the language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vartaks
vartaks
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Duolingo accepts this now [March 2nd 2015]

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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It's accepted at the moment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Was pondering the use of 'Me'. From what I can find it is not needed. Future indicative; quedarê = 'I will' Subjunctive future; quedarê = 'I/he/she/usted will'

Thoughts?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

The verb being used here is quedarse - the reflexive form of quedar - which is conjugated in the future: me quedaré, te quedarás, se quedará, etc. The difference between quedar and quedarse is subtle, the best explanation I have seen says that quedarse is used when you stay deliberately and quedar in the sense that you have been left. Incidentally, the future subjunctive 1st/3rd person is quedare which is spelled and pronounced differently to the future 1st person quedaré.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobspaj

Often 'quedar' is well translated as remain while 'quedarse' works better as stay. 'me quedar' I remain myself or in English that might actually be used 'I stay'. The reflexive is a good clue.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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thank you iakobski! for your excellent analysis of quedar/quedarse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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With the meaning above quedar can be pronominal or not, with a small difference in meaning. If you say "me quedaré tres noches", it means you are staying deliberately, meaning that it was your choice to stay, so if you say "quedaré tres noches", it means you are staying, but because of reasons that go beyond you, reasons that you cannot control. This difference has been lost in many dialects, so some people might say thatquedarse is the only correct choice, but both are correct in the proper context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

I thought the Me was redundant also

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The me is important here. The verb that's used in this sentence is quedarse - to stay.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I 'shall' stay is a perfectly correct future tense; in fact, more correct than I 'will' stay

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doinal77
doinal77
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I agree! I have been "flagging" this for months with no outcome ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobspaj

The difference between 'shall' and 'will' is pretty subtle in English. The only times I've heard it being used in North America recently were in plays about proper, English school teachers being very frosty with someone who wasn't doing what they were told. The idea was that the person was physically able to something, but it they did there would be severe consequences. Example: "You shall not chew gum in my class." Clearly the person could chew gum. On the other hand, the teacher has stout yard stick which she will use to rap your knuckles it you do. 'Shall' kind of fits in with the time when there were yard sticks (not meter sticks) and corporal punishment was still a regular occurrence in schools. If you are a non-native English speaker and want people to stare at you, go right ahead and sprinkle your conversation with 'shall', 'thou' etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whiteway15

Not sure I completely agree with all that, but "shall" is definitely correct, especially in the first person, if arguably a little old-fashioned

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Quite right jacobspaj. Misplaced use (or overuse) of the word 'shall' marks a person out as a somewhat pretentious type.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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12/2014 - thank you jacobspaj..for your succinct explanation of stay/remain

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gregwind

The top suggested translation for quedaré is "I will be" which fits in an opposite sense -- I will be (away for) three nights. I can't think of an occasion when "I will be" is a suitable replacement for "I will stay." How would you use quedaré to mean I will be?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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First, it is important that you use quedarse, because that indicates intention. Second, it is an example of a translation dictionary that includes examples like this:

  • Me quedaré en la casa mientras la inspección.

Which many would phrase in English as "I will be in my house during the inspection". It is only added to cover situations like that, and should be thought of as a paraphrased translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

hey, will stay and will be staying are one in the same thing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

Similar but not the same, they're different tenses. "Will stay" is the simple future and "will be staying" is the continuous future. "I will be staying" would be "estaré quedando".

Incidentally, your comment should be "one and the same" not "one in the same".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miguel364067

Muchas gracias, iakobski

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaSpiroXhardo
LindaSpiroXhardo
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I'm sharing lingots everywhere in the comments because I have to complish a new achievement. The one of spending 200 lingots

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juanalton

DL just cannot accept the (actually more) correct translation, "I SHALL stay three nights." This has been reported, but they do not seem to comprehend the English first person singular and plural.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaPau
MichaPau
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As a negation: no me quédaré tres noches - would that mean I will be away for three nights ??

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"No me quedaré tres noches" simply means "I will not stay for three nights". Whether that means that you won't stay at all or you do stay but for a different duration is up for the reader to decide.

"I will be away for three nights" can be translated as "Estaré fuera (por) tres noches."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Papi2fine

It didn't accept "I'll stay three nights" either

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It should!

4 months ago