"Sicuramente lui le avrà chieste."

Translation:Certainly he will have asked for them.

July 23, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Blomeley

I guess the 'le' (and the 'them' in the english translation) could be referring to 'domande'. But is there any reason that it doesn't accept "Certainly he will have asked her"?

July 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiamma90

That's because "chieste" agrees with "le", and it can only agree with the direct object, while "her" would be an indirect object. So in this case "le" is the direct object. You can use the clitic pronoun "le" as an indirect object but in this case it would be "chiesto", not "chieste". In that sentence there is no indirect object specified - you have no way of knowing who is being asked.

July 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/dfjacobs

The only problem is that in the dictation, "chieste" sounds like "chiesto" to me.

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Viaggiatore

I think "chiedere le domande" is ungrammatical (unless you mean "ask for the questions"), so I don't think le and chieste refer to domande. "Certainly he will have asked her" as a translation doesn't explain the E ending on chieste.

July 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiamma90

Maybe it's not the best lexical choice, but why should "chiedere le domande" be ungrammatical?

July 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Viaggiatore

Maybe that's a better way of saying it. "Ask a question" is "fare una domanda."

July 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiamma90

The translation doesn't seem right to me - I would translate "Certainly he will have asked for them". Here the verb "chiedere" means "to ask for".

he will have asked them = either lui gli avrà chiesto or lui avrà chiesto loro

he will have asked her = lui le avrà chiesto (note that here "chiesto" agrees in number and gender with the subject, while in "lui le avrà chieste", "chieste" agrees with the object "le")

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/peter2108

Certainly he will have asked for them is the tranlation now given

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Blomeley

I thought asking to a person used an indirect object so this would have meant he asked 'her' instead of 'them'.

To say ask them the right pronoun would be 'gli', right?

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/maloewe

this was my impression as well .. it is too bad, there aren't any explanations here

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/runem

I believe it would be "loro", then, the plural indirect object pronoun. "Gli" is singular :)

January 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Viaggiatore

Chiedere qualcosa a qualcuno = to ask somebody (for) something. The indirect object is the person being asked, and the direct object is the thing being asked for. So I think the translation should be Surely he (or she) will have asked him for them.

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Blomeley

I would say that both of you are right, and this one needs some correction

July 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa

Why is "le" not her? Isn't this the Ind. Obj. pronoun? Them would be "loro"? If not, how would you say "he will have asked her" And I don't understand "asked for them"

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiamma90

"le" can be both an indirect (feminine singular) and direct (feminine plural) object pronoun. In this case it is a direct object pronoun that refers to something feminine and plural (e.g. "le sedie", "le magliette"), and you can see that because the "chieste" part of the verb changes accordingly, while it does not change when "le" is used as an indirect object pronoun: compare "lui le avrà chiesto" ("he will have asked her") and "lui gli avrà chiesto" ("he will have asked him"). It can be useful to remind that while in English you ask "for something", in Italian you ask "something" (direct object).

This is a very difficult part of Italian grammar! Clitic pronouns such as "le" and "gli" behave differently than "normal" pronouns such as "lui" and "lei". At which point of the tree is this topic presented?

November 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa

This is a well stated explanation. I am very grateful. It is still not totally clear, but now I know why it's not clear. I'll have to spend some time digesting the difference between Eng. & It. usage of these pronouns. Thank you very much.

November 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/maloewe

thx a lot!!

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/barra86

The right pronoun for them is "loro" but in this sentence them is traslated by "le" which means something female and plural. (if it was something plural and masculine it would be "li")

July 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JoToutin

for sure was not accepted. Why ?

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/StanKing1

E smetti di chiamarmi "Sicuramente" :-)

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cseverin80

"Surely he will have asked her" was rejected

May 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pablosch61

As explained by several people above- "le" only means her if it is an INDIRECT object. If it had been an indirect object here then chiestO would have been the participle--the participle only changes to agree with DIRECT OBJECTS-- but it was chiestE- which means "le" has to be a DIRECT object agreeing with the end of the participle. And in Italian, the DIRECT object of chiedere is the thing you ask for. The person you ask is an INDIRECT object.
He will have asked her- Le avra' chiesto

He will have asked for her (or a feminine it) - La avra' chiesta

He will have asked them - Avra' chiesto loro

He will have asked for them -Le avra' chieste or Li avra' chiesti

July 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelGit4

'le' can also mean her as well as them

June 14, 2018
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