https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Okay, something just hit me about Spanish.

This is probably obvious to everyone else, but it struck me like a revelation this morning.

To eat = comer; Food = comida

To look at = mirar; View = mirada

Can you noun verbs like this in Spanish? In English we just use the same word for both nouns and verbs.

Examples:

I run every day; I had a very good run today.

Let's eat; Man those were good eats.

Okay, so that second example has an s on the end of the noun and is informal usage, but there are tons more like this where we just use the same word, aren't there?

We are meeting this morning; Are you coming to the meeting?

This sweater makes me itch; Don't scratch that itch in public.

etc. etc.

So in Spanish can I use this general rule? These are things I just made up and haven't looked up yet to see if they are real words:

Cortar = to cut; Cortada = clippings, trimmings?? (I looked it up and it can be a pizza slice or a tennis swing where you put spin on the ball.)

Entrar = to come in; Entrada = entranceway? (This one works, too.)

Beber = to drink; Bebida = a drink? (Totally works.)

Cantar = to sing; Cantada = a song? (I think it's a actually cancion, but there are cantatas in classical music so maybe that's a latin word that kind of follows the same schemata (hah!).) (I looked this up and it's a goalkeeping error.... so )

But does this often actually work? If so it makes things a lot easier for me! What say ye polyglots and linguists of the duolingo mundo?

3 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KansasBurri

Cookies should be bakies. You don't cook cookies you bake them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

That has bugged me ever since I was a kid reading Mrs Pigglewiggle (when the spelling of "cooky" threw me off).

So 28 years later, I looked it up. "Cookie" comes from the Dutch word "koekje," meaning "little cakes. And "biscuit," as in what the Brits call what Americans would call cookies, comes from Latin and means twice-baked. I don't know about you, but I don't bake my cookies twice, unless they're biscotti...oohhhh.

Brb baking now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Hahaha, I don't bake my biscuits but once either!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Hahaha, true!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Found more!

Llegar = to arrive; Llegada = arrival

Saber = to know; Sabida = learned, well-informed. (In this case it's an adjective and not a noun.)

Querer = to want, love; Querida = dear, beloved. (adj.)

Ir = to go; Ida = departure (noun)

Lograr = to accomplish; logrado/a = successful (adj.)

Pasar = to pass; Pasada = a pass. (noun)

Deber = to owe; Debida = Due, proper (adj.)

Encontrar = to find; Encontrada = found (adj.)

Llamar = to call; Llamada = a call (noun)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truelefty
truelefty
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 220

"Sabida".... it's not what you say....

"Learned" or "Well-informed" is "Educado" (Educated) or maybe "Knowledged"... Actually, no one uses that word, you say "Sabe mucho" ("He/She knows a lot"), but you don't say "Es un sabido"...

And "Logrado" means "achieved"

"Debida", for me it doesn't exist. A due is "Deuda"

That.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Thanks for the corrections! I got this stuff off spanishdict.com. I'm not sure how accurate it is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie
Rozzie
  • 18
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 5
  • 15

What about éxito it also means successful?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Éxito = success

Exitoso = successful

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie
Rozzie
  • 18
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 5
  • 15

Okay thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Hahaha. What a great revelation! And Yes, English seems very practical in that sense to me. And although in Spanish, sometimes it works, you should be a little more careful than in English because it usually remains the same root but the rest of the word often changes and sometimes the resulting meaning does not exist or is not the expected. I think Spanish is a bit more tricky in this sense.

Bebida= A drink or beverage (well done) :)

Entrada = Entryway (well done) :)

Cortada= a cut. Tengo una cortada profunda en la mano = I have a deep cut on the hand

Cantada is not a song. Una canción = a song

Caminar= to walk Una caminata = a walk

I hope my answer has been and useful. If you have any further questions, please ask. I like to teach my language especially to people as curious as you.

P. D .: Remember to correct my mistakes, please.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Thank you! Now I will spend the day transforming and looking up every verb I know and see what it makes as a noun, if anything! P.S. Your English is perfect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Excelente. Sigue así. De seguro seguirás haciendo grandes descubrimientos ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

I'll keep you updated below. =D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandyturtle

ok I am really bad at explaining grammar concepts but I believe what you are doing is creating past participles, which also can be used as adjectives. for regular ar verbs drop the ar & add ado. regular er/ir drop & add ido. example :cerrar cerrado . I had closed the door: había cerrado la puerta. (its a participle there) to use as an adjective it needs to match what its describing in gender & number. the door is closed: la puerta esta cerrada. I'm not sure if all participles can be used as adjectives.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

I wondered if this were some totally obvious and normal thing that everyone knew about but me. And your explanation does make sense. Thanks! What do you think of the fact that it doesn't seem to work for a lot of verbs? They are just irregular?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandyturtle

just like all the other tenses (present, preterite etc) there are irregular participles. said: dicho seen: visto done: hecho put: puesto . I would recommend studying these 8 verbs : hacer, poner, tener, ir, ser, venir, salir, & decir, just because they are commonly used verbs that are irregular in almost every tense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Good idea! Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
  • 23
  • 17
  • 12
  • 11
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

I don't think your observations have been totally obvious. In fact, I've studied Spanish off and on for quite some time now and have never seen anyone make them in quite that way before, so I found your post rather interesting, and I think those who read this are likely to start examining language (their own and their target language) in a more analytical way.

The advice mandyturtle gave you is very good and I would start with that. You should also know that some verbs have more than one participle. Somebody in another thread posted a link to a Reverso list of them, which you can view by clicking on the link below:

Verbos con doble participio

After examining the list, I came to the conclusion that not all 70 verbs on that list truly have two participles (at least not two participles that are commonly used in modern day Spanish). In fact, I whittled the list down to 50 and made a couple of Memrise courses for them. You can link to them below:

50 Spanish Verbs That Have 2 Participles

Supplement to 50 Spanish Verbs

HTH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanka_ps
Ivanka_ps
  • 24
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3

Yep, that's called "Nominalización de verbos". Here are a few more examples.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Whoa! Thank you, Vanka! I knew it must be a thing. That's a great link. I'm holding on to it. Many thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Okay so I Anglified this phrase "Nominalización de verbos" (or would it be that I Englished it?) and googled and came up with this wiki article which is great for the students of English out there, or just for those who have a higher comfort level reading in English. It turns out it's a thing that happens in a lot of different languages. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominalization

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toussaintlou
toussaintlou
  • 17
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6

You may not have seen this before:

https://duolinguista.wordpress.com/2014/10/31/complete-spanish-lessons-11-and-12/

The 12 Spanish cognate rules.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yalreen

Thanks! I did not about this site. It seems very useful!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toussaintlou
toussaintlou
  • 17
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6

That's my Spanish blog. I have not posted for some time, because I'm focused on my French and the blog I where I post my French study notes: https://duolinguist.wordpress.com/

Eventually I'll get back to it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

That's an excellent page! Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wonderboy6
Wonderboy6
  • 25
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13

Those were good EATS? lol, what part of the world are you from,,you'll never hear that in England

Also:

salir/to leave - salida/exit

morir/to die - moriarty/Sherlock Holmes bad guy lol!

estar/ to be - bienestar/ well being

conocer/to know - conocimiento/knowledge

deber- el deber/a duty

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Oh there was a television program called "Good Eats". It's a very common expression here in the states, though it's informal.

Moriarty made me laugh out loud. =D Great example!

Excellent additional examples, too. I feel I understand much more now about Spanish from reading all these linked sites and things, and really about all languages. My familiarity and grasp of it seems to have taken a jump, and it's less scary and intimidating to me now. =)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
  • 23
  • 17
  • 12
  • 11
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

Your profile gives your location as Alabama, but just to back you up "eats," "good eats," and other variations are heard/used throughout the United States. Granted, I probably wouldn't use such a word in an academic paper, but it's a great word to spice up your speech with.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truelefty
truelefty
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 220

NOTE: I'm level 10 but I'm a native speaker, don't worry xD

"Cantada" means "sung", La canción fue cantada, The song was sung...

But yes, that works. And what's "What say ye polyglots and linguists of the duolingo mundo?"???

  • Computar = To compute, to calculate, Computador = Computer
  • Publicar = To publish Publicación = A post, something that was published
  • Discutir = To discuss Discusión = A discussion
  • Aprender = To learn Aprendizaje = The noun of "learn", maybe "The learning" Aprendiz = The learner, the one who learns

I don't know how it works, for me the words just "come"...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

"What say ye" is an old fashioned (Shakespearean) way to say "What do you say". The word "ye" is an old second person plural pronoun in the familiar mode that is almost never used anymore. Polyglots are people who speak multiple languages, linguists study language, and the duolingo mundo is just a silly way to say the world of duolingo, or the people of duolingo. I liked the way it sounds. I find I've gotten more playful with language due to duolingo's influence.

Those are good examples that you add! Thanks! And isn't it great being a native speaker? I'm so jealous! =D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truelefty
truelefty
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 220

Hahaha!! First, thank you for the information you gave me, we all learn here.

And, answering to the native question: And isn't great for you being a native ENGLISH speaker?? The most useful language in the world?!!? For certain, speaking perfect spanish is a really useful thing, you can speak to almost an entire continent! But speaking english, come on, that thing is really more useful.

But yes, now that I am a little bit more immersed in the "duolingo mundo", I feel that being native in spanish is a quite good thing.

:D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElimGarak

One thing I have learned is that every principle or rule has its exceptions. By the way, ver is to see and ser and estar both mean to be. Vida is likely from the latin vita. We get our word vital from it. Id does mean life.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Yes I was posting while half awake, and got ver and ser confused, so I fixed it. It definitely doesn't work for ver... or ser.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teacher95

Food for thought. Thanks & Happy New Year.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Same to you, Teacher!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suayem

corrección:

"Bebir = to drink" (esta mal) la traducción es "BEBER = to drink"

saludos

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Thank you! I will fix it. It's embarrassing to make so many little obvious mistakes like I do.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suayem

No te preocupes, todos estamos aprendiendo. Nada tiene de malo equivocarse ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mackeye5532

That makes sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albantar
Albantar
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6

Totally reminds me of a Caspar and Hobbes cartoon where Caspar expressed his love of "verbing nouns and adjectives".

"Verbing weirds language". ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miriam_MM

To cut in Spain is:

Cut=Cortar

Yo corto = I cut Tu cortas = You cut Ella/ÉL corta = She/He/It cuts Nosotros cortamos = We cut Vosotros Cortáis = You cut Ellos cortan = They cut

Like you see, in spanish it's a little bit difficult than english, because the verbs have a differents terminations, but nothing is impossible!

If you want, i will help you in Espanish from Spain, and you help me with English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miriam_MM

Just remember that i always say to myself...Never give up! :)

3 years ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.