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"The rice lacks salt."

Translation:El arroz está escaso de sal.

5 years ago

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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El arroz no tiene sal--this answer also accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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No tiene sal = there's no salt at all. There's zero salt. Escaso de sal = It lacks salt. (in unformal conversation, we can probably use "no tiene sal" instead to mean it's very few, but it's not the normal meaning)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I'm not sure how correct it is, but 'lacks' is used in English sometimes to mean that there isn't any at all.

Update: I looked up the verb 'lack': "be without or deficient in"

So it can also mean that there is none at all. I'm not sure if 'carecer' works the same way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Senior824352

"Lacks salt" means the same thing as "has no salt".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

You can say something lacks salt when you mean it has no salt. However, without context, "lacks salt" can mean there is salt but not enough. Therefore, "lacks salt" does not mean the same thing as "has no salt."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jill572804

Lacks salt CAN mean has no, but it also can mean it needs more, in English

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger-Dale
Roger-Dale
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The rice lacks a certain amount of salt. or The rice entirely lacks the ingredient salt.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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"lacks" means both "has no" or "doesn't have enough". Generally, "lacks" is more associated with "having none".

If you want to say the rice has some salt and use the word "lacks", then to be very clear, you should say "the rice lacks enough salt" or "the rice wants/needs more salt".

It is important to realize in these exercises that Duo isn't perfect, and that sometimes exercises present controversies which are generated by Duo's poor use of language, lack of adequate or any context, and/or desire to generate discussion by giving us ambiguous, uncertain sentences designed to teach something else besides the obvious. it's kind of schizo - purporting to teach basic language skills, but getting into these nice distinctions of language use that could easily be a topic in a graduate course. Duo is great, but it also leaves a tremendous amount to be desired as a teacher of basic language.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

I answered "El arroz no tiene sal" because that is what it suggested to me when I got it wrong.
If I did not come to the discussion, I would not have known that the primary answer was "El arroz está escaso de sal".
Considering this is in the adjective lesson, it would have been a shame if I had not found this out.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junevilleco

Why is it Al (not el) arroz if the verb falta is used (El arroz le falta sal was marked wrong, correct translation provided Al arroz le falta sal). Is this something to be aware of when using the verb faltar?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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Faltar is an intransitive verb. The subject is the thing that's lacking, in this case the salt. "The salt is missing from the rice."

It's not an impersonal verb ("to rain" is impersonal) since it can easily be plural. Le faltan los zapatos "His shoes are missing."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I think it's literally like "Le falta sal al arroz", with a missing "it" subject, and not "arroz" as a subject. It lacks salt to the rice. "faltar" seems to be impersonal here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesCaulfield1

I wrote "el arroz falta sal" and it corrected me with "al arroz le falta sal." Lesson learned.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jahcrooks

Estar escaso de=be short of

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RolloMartins

El arroz carece de sal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

I wrote, "El arroz carece de la sal." Duo didn't like the "la" added to the sentence and counted me wrong. What's wrong with adding the article "la" to this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes, I'd like to know is it the fact that when you put "la", you talk about a specific salt. THE salt?

When you google the expression, you can only find sentences with this construction: "Su cuerpo carece de la sal que tenemos normalmente.", here, definite salt. (in the body)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dejo
Dejo
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I also put in "la" and I was thinking of the specific salt that the recipe calls for:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/book.bound

it's two years too late and maybe you know the answer to this by now but intuitively I find that when the word is a -

subject of the sentence -> usually takes on an article object in the sentence -> article will depend on the context

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J_oseBravo

Una mejor traducción es: "al arroz le falta sal" or "le falta sal al arroz".

"El arroz está escaso de sal" nadie lo dice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PharaohDelMundo

Why not el arroz falta sal?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bega1
bega1
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a el arroz le falta sal.... it is a perfect spanish... el arroz carece de sal... but we are working with a system.... by that. there are few options

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlhwilson

Actually, in this case faltar IS indeed used the same as "Gustar" in that faltar can be... "salt is lacking to the rice" SALT is the subject of the verb not RICE... Such as "Me gusta arroz sin sal" literally means "Rice without salt is pleasing to me" When I say it is used in the same way as gustar (from English to Spanish) I was referring to the fact that the subject Object Pronoun are reversed...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bega1
bega1
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"Me gusta EL arroz sin sal" Already I understand the relation between faltar and gustar that you said... And yes. You are right... Salt is the subject because we are speaking the salt ...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlhwilson

Then why did you correct my previous comment?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bega1
bega1
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because the sentence is not using the verb to like..... I understand your sentence when you use. Me gusta el arroz sin sal.... it is a good phrase only...... and I am not correcting your ideas.. I am learning and working with you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Bega1, not "a el arroz le falta sal" but "al arroz..."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nemesis6

el arroz falta sal?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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If you use faltar, it is " Al arroz le falta sal." And like I have written many times before, Duolingo needs a unit dedicated to the verbs that behave like gustar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeroen6200090
Jeroen6200090
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No it has to be: "al arroz le falta sal" . This was accepted by DL.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimCzarkow

Why do you need to structure it like that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlhwilson

Because Faltar is used in the same way as Gustar... That said DL did not accept mine... But I did add the la for the sal so maybe that's why they didn't accept it...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Maybe because a litteral translation in English would include a skipped "it" in Spanish?

Literally, I think: It lacks salt to the rice = Le falta sal al arroz. And not a construction with "arroz" as the subject of "lacking".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carter.ag
carter.ag
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So is a more literal translation of this sentence into English "The salt is missing from the rice"? Like "Me gusta la manzana" is literally "The apple pleases me" but works as "I like the apple"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Correcto

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DGPerez101

"Le falta sal al arroz" should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bega1
bega1
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yes,, your sentence is correct and I can understand it very well but its order is different. mayby It lacks salt to the rice=le falta sal al arroz o carece de sal el arroz

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clinton57
Clinton57
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carere < L. carere, as in English caret: "mark in writing to show where something is to be inserted," 1680s, from Latin caret "there is lacking," 3rd person singular indicative of carere "to lack", e.g. French hôtel

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boob194240
Boob194240
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What's wrong with 'el arroz escasa sal'? Escasar is a verb as well, right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnjusa

Wrong. The verb is ESCASEAR. But Duolingo does not accept "escasea". I will report.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

My understanding of escasear suggests it would not work well in this sentence. The transitive form of the verb means to skimp on something, which would mean that the rice skimped on salt. You could restructure the sentence to say something like, "salt in the rice is scarce/lacking" - la sal en el arroz escasea, but that seems different enough that Duo is unlikely to accept it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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I can't imagine myself saying such a sentence. I'd rather say: "al arroz le falta sal" or (even better) "el arroz está soso".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrrha01
Myrrha01
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The rice is so-so! That will be easy to remember.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bkmanabita

it's an awkward sentence, no one talks like this

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/officerjohnw

Agree

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AshleyBlackwood

why does escaso modify rice and not the salt? It's either a really stupid question or I missed a rule somewhere along the way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avigoool

El arroz esta escase sal

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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Ive learned a lot from comments below. Can anyone say if falta de sal en el arroz should be accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jokumusic
jokumusic
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Why isn't "al arroz le falta la sal" correct. I thought the article "la" is necessary with these types of verbs - like with gustar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkat
dkat
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could you say "el arroz es sin sal"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bassheadxx

No, because that means there is no salt at all. The sentence is saying that there is some salt, but there is not enough.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkat
dkat
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Not in the English I use. "deficiency or absence of something needed, desirable, or customary" absence means none is there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mannysmedia

El arroz falta sal?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/44767mt

My translator says; "El arroz carece de sal" Your answer translates as "Rice is in short supply of salt", which is not correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/writingwizard

escaso means little (in amount)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoomerangLang

...no tiene sal. This should be accepted but the program does not reflect that. Also, do native speakers (Spain?) really say ...escaso de sal?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asferdinand

The sentence given--'El arroz está escaso de sal' sounds very unnatural to me, and not the way someone would say 'The rice lacks salt' in an everyday context. Are there any native speakers that could confirm or clarify this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie7511

why do you need the de?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anthonyhill780

Why escaso and not escasa

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnjusa

Because "escaso" is adjective, has to be in correlation with masculine noun "el arroz".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garyspector1

you said al arroz !!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrrha01
Myrrha01
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El arroz le falta sal?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrrha01
Myrrha01
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So," Al arroz le falta sal" is the correct version.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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Lack= no tiene Escaso =escasso pouco

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MourlayeTr
MourlayeTr
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Al arroz le falta sal...., this is also correct, my question is, what is the difference between "le" and "lo" in a sentence?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"El arroz carece de sal" or "Al arroz le falta sal"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

I wrote - Al arroz se falta sal . Duo wanted Al arroz LE falta sal. Anyone care to jump in? Am I correct in assuming that FALTAR needs the object le

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
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I'm just wondering why the verb doesn't agree in gender with "sal"? (escasa de sal"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderSayers
AlexanderSayers
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Would 'El arroz se falta sal' work?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellery914120

it also accepted "al arroz le falta sal"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarryUlman

My program said "Al arroz le falta sal. I never heard of the article "al", and the rest of the answer seemed totally unrelated.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanLibera1

"al" isn't part of the official answer that I see at the top of this page, but in case you are wondering about "al", it is a spanish contraction for "a el".

I looked up "le falta"on spanishdict.com: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/le%20falta

They gave a translation of "used to indicate that something is absent" and the example sentence was

Al enchufe le falta una clavija. -- The plug has one pin missing.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarryUlman

How about, "El arroz no tiene muchas de sal."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I think you'd say, El arroz no tiene mucha sal.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarryUlman

OK, I was thinking of "Muchas Gracias." But I now realize that Gracias is plural, therefore "muchas". Mucha would be for singular, such as sal, right?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Sí, correcto.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil712772

El arroz necesita sal. Better!!

2 months ago