"You are welcome!"

Translation:Prego!

July 23, 2013

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Nitram.

Prego is sooo formal, it should accept "di niente", "di nulla", let us learn some informal words as well...

September 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Moikka88

"prego" is absolutely not formal, but it is in common use in italy

August 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Nitram.

I was in Caorle last year and few people said prego... most people said "di niente".

August 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Moikka88

I am italian and I often say "prego" as answer of "thanks", however i do not know anybody from Caorle... Then it's true that the other replies that you wrote are correct answers (di niente, di nulla, also figurati and many other), but the english translation will be different (di niente/di nulla = it's nothing)

August 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda827627

It depends on where u go!! In florence and milano and so on everyone says prego

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/peterdutton

Yes, we heard "prego" a lot in Rome.

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_Nakazawa

I'm guessing those mean something along the lines of "No problem," right?

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/quoudten

It's also similar to the Spanish, "de nada". Nada and niente mean nothing, so direct translation to English doesn't really make sense, but "No problem" is in fact the closest translation.

July 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/_Carowo_

Also similar to portuguese which is the same as in spanish

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AriaDePalma

Well... its the most common and easiest to learn and di niente mostly means "no problem" I know cuz I'm Italian

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/-Sapphira-

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emilyboney

Is "Tu sei prego" incorrect then?

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2079

You could use the direct translation "benvenuto" (bene=well, venuto=come), but that doesn't have the idiomatic meaning of answering "thanks". Rather, it's the literal welcoming: "Sei il benvenuto in casa mia", you're welcome in my home.

July 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/guupi

Siete i benvenuti/le benvenute for plural?

September 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/verdaci

I am sorry, but there was no context thus a translation into "You are welcome!" looks rather logical.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/peaceeh

Just prego or di niente or di nulla but the last they not use .. near to always they use Prego..

February 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Viaggiatore

Definitely. Prego isn't an adjective.

July 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Faux3

In american slang, it most definitely is...

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Fardong

Can "ti prego" be used?

February 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/liga2003

Yes it can be good.. its kindly

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Fardong

Thanks for the answer :)

March 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/riverdemon

yes, but it means "please", like "I beg you". Not "you're welcome".

November 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/timberleyn

Can "Tu sei benvenuto"or Lei e benvenuto" be used in some situations.

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Viaggiatore

"benvento" means you're happy to see them.

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/highgardener

I typed Di Niente and it said it was wrong

December 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tristetrista

why is "tu sei prego" incorrect?

August 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/stefranz1

Prego is a short form to answer to "thanks" which stands alone...it has nothing to do with "you are welcome" which translates to "sei il benvenuto (sing.)" or "siete i benvenuti (plur.)" which have the same meaning of the english "Welcome!".

Another meaning of "prego" is "I pray", literally "(io) prego"

September 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/im_sarah

i think because it isn't necessary to say the subject

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MujahidMrghani

"Prego is common used than "di niente"

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ekb1

it depend very much on the context

January 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/StormAlong

Yes and no context is given. Some form of benvenuto should definitely have been accepted.

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/alpha999

Cant it be "piacere"?

January 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2079

No, "piacere" as a greeting means "nice to meet you".

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitum17

What does prego actually mean, literally?

March 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Moomingirl

I pray.

April 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CassandraAdelina

please

April 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CassandraAdelina

”con piacere” would not be an option? I know they use it.

April 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/andersonbr74

prego

(ˈprɛɡo)

exclamation

(a chi ringrazia) don't mention it!, you're welcome!, not at all!(invitando qn ad accomodarsi)please sit down!(invitando qn ad andare prima) after you!

prego, si accomodi (entri) please come in(si sieda) please take a seat

posso prenderlo? — prego! can I take it? — please do!

prego? pardon?, sorry? (Brit)

(https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/italian-english/prego)

December 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KateciaIng

Can w even

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Giacomo477290

I said. Tu sei benvenuto

July 31, 2018
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