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"Las mujeres españolas"

Translation:The Spanish women

5 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kwakwerk
Kwakwerk
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Farewell and adieu to you fair Spanish ladies, Farewell and adieu to you ladies of Spain, For we've received orders to sail back to England, And never so more shall we see you again.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"Él vino en un barco, de nombre "Extranjero",

Lo encontré el puerto un anochecer ,

cuando el blanco faro sobre los veleros

su beso de plata dejaba caer.

Era hermoso y rubio como la cerveza,

el pecho tatuado con un corazón,

en su voz amarga, había la tristeza

doliente y cansada del acordeón.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LEGEND
LEGEND
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Fancy being a sailor? Join my crew matey!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

@Elizabeth0: thanks a lot, that is what I thought, that both "Spanish" and "Spaniard" were fine, but I was told that only "Spaniard" was correct when you use it as the noun for "inhabitant of Spain" ._. May I ask you where are you from? Maybe it is a regional difference?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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I was going to add that there's the word, "Hispanic" which is used as both a noun or an adjective for a Spanish person. Hispanic is a bit more formal.

However, when you ask about regional differences, all of these terms will have regional differences, i.e. Latino, Hispanic, Spanish, etc. This gets into a risky ethnic/racial discussion.

I'm from New Mexico (the US state between Arizona and Texas) although I currently live in Connecticut. (And, yes, although many New Mexicans are bilingual, English is the predominant language. Anyways, the preferred term for someone of Spanish descent in New Mexico is typically Hispanic, but on the east coast of the USA it's Latino. However, I usually just ask someone what they prefer rather than risking putting my foot in my mouth.

My guess is that you are correct that it is a regional difference, and the person was cautioning you to avoid using "Spanish person" when describing a Spaniard.

Although honestly, neither "Spanish" nor "Hispanic" is a problem when you are describing a person from Spain. The problem is when you use these terms for a person from the western hemisphere. Then, it's best to find out which term they prefer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Hi, Salxandra, it was very interesting to read your post, thanks! The person was correcting me saying "I am Spanish", so I would not be offended by myself XD But I understand what you mean.

@Elizabeth0: Hispanic comes from "Hispania" (an old name for the Iberian Peninsula) and it includes Spaniards too, even if we do not use it that way; we do not really call Latin Americans "hispanos" either (I have not heard it that often, at least). We either call them by their own nationality (argentinos, uruguayos, mexicanos), sudamericanos (South American, lot more used where I live (Catalonia)) or latinos. But we use "South American" for Mexican people too (who are not in South America, after all) and "latino" is also a bit confusing, because if you take it by the linguistic side, latin people are those who speak: Portuguese, Italian, French, Romanian, Catalan and Spanish since our languages come from Latin, hence the name @_@

I think it is a very interesting topic, but as I always say: better call people by their names XD

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

Isn't Hispanic mainly used for Latin American people of Spanish descent and not people from Spain itself? I've never heard an actual Spaniard called Hispanic, but perhaps it's as you say and really is a regional difference. The one example that you give, though, of someone of Spanish descent in New Mexico I would agree with the use of Hispanic there and use Hispanic and Latino interchangeably in that case.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gjmontll

In the USA, the terms Hispanic and Latino are used to describe one's ethnicity. This is a separate issue from one's nationality (e.g. Spanish). I am a second generation USA-born citizen. My grandfather came from Spain (Catalonia) therefore I consider my ethnicity as clearly Hispanic (and not Latino, since there was no Latin America component to my heritage.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busterbeaver

According to Wikipedia, they seem to be more or less interchangeable except that Brazilians would be considered Latino but not Hispanic, and Spaniards would be Hispanic but not Latino. I agree with Babella's last point, though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaRuthWo

I said the hispanic women and I was marked incorrect.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

No hay de que. :) Y soy de los Estados Unidos (más específicamente, Nueva Jersey). Where was the person from, if you know, who said only "Spaniard" was fine? I've never heard of a place where using "Spanish" is not acceptable, but I suppose it could be a possibility...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

(Qué bien escribes en español o_o). I think he was from the US too, but I am not sure and could not find it. Since I learned British English at school, I thought maybe that was in the US, so you solved my doubt anyway XD Muchas gracias de nuevo :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

Re: "Qué bien escribes en español": Eres demasiado amable. Deseo que eso fue cierto...pero espero que va a ser cierto en el futuro próximo con la ayuda de este sitio y personas que, como tú, responder a tantas preguntas acerca de español. :)

Y gracias por el información acerca de "Hispanic." ¡Estoy de acuerdo con tu última frase, "I think it is a very interesting topic, but as I always say: better call people by their names"! :D

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

No, en serio, tienes muy pocos fallos (los verbos y "la información" nada más ;]), usas bien los acentos y tu puntuación es muy buena (mejor que la de muchos nativos, sinceramente). Seguro que no tardas nada en perfeccionarlo del todo, ¡mucho ánimo! Y si necesitas algo, no dudes en preguntar ;]

Claro, es mucho más sencillo no ofender a nadie llamándole por su nombre ;P

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

¡Muchas gracias por el aliento (y la corrección)! Me encanta practicar mi español. ji ji

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Babella, I am not sure if this is what you want to know, but .... "I am Spanish" and "I am a Spaniard" are correct -- but "I am a Spanish" is NOT correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

It was not that (but thank you anyway, I am sure it can be useful for someone else!). Thanks for confirming that both "I am Spanish" and "I am a Spaniard" are correct, by the way, this thing was so confusing! XD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuncanCV

Am I correct in assuming that in this case Spanish Women refers to Women who speak Spanish and not Women from Spain?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I am not sure how it works in English, but in Spanish "español" or "española" means "from Spain".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

It works the same in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I was told it was Spaniard for people from Spain?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

"Spaniard" is the NOUN for people from Spain, while "Spanish" is an ADJECTIVE which means from Spain (or a noun which refers to the Spanish language). So when talking about a group of people from Spain, you could say, "They are Spanish people," and that would mean the same thing as, "They are Spaniards."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I see, thank you! Someone else corrected me on this in a different topic and now I have a doubt: Is it different if I refer to myself or just one person instead of a group of people? Soy española, Juan es español = I am Spanish, Juan is Spanish or are I am a Spaniard, Juan is a Spaniard the only correct options?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

@Babella: Sí, "I am Spanish" y "Juan is Spanish" son completamente correctos. :) "Spanish" is for both singular and plural, and for adjectives that come after the noun they are modifying (so the structure would be "noun is/are/am adjective" as in the two examples you were talking about), you can just leave the adjective by itself and don't have to put another noun after it like I did in "They are Spanish people." So in other words, instead of saying, "They are Spanish people," I could have just said, "They are Spanish" just like it is correct to say "The man is old" or "The runner is fast."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I think it's the same in every language, it's a nationality adjective, and every language has certainly the same ones. Someone who speak Spanish in English is a "Spanish-speaker", in Spanish is un "hispanohablante", and in French is un "hispanophone", it's never confused with the nationality adjective, I don't think there's a language where it is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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@Babella I found that on a yahoo form: "both are grammatically correct

and BOTH refer to someone's procedence. if you come from the european country of Spain then you are Spanish and Spaniard.

if you don't come from Spain then you're not spanish even if you speak spanish.

both nouns mean the same, "spanish" is also used to name the language which originated in Spain and was taught to the natives in latin america andcentral america from 1492 on. Source: I AM FROM SPAIN"

But reading this same forum, it seems a lot of people think Spanish is only for the language, and Spaniard only for the nationality, I don't think so.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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English has 2 origins, 2 mothers: the Germanic old English, and the French. It's the reason why you have sometimes 2 different words for a same thing, you have the word according the "normal" filiation, and from the French filiation. The "normal" making of the nationality adjective is with "ish", "ese" and "an", but this word is taken from the old French. The old word to call "Spain" in French used to be "Espaigne" (pronounced "èspègn", (and this word became in modern French "Espagne"), the ajective relative to this old word "Espaigne", was "Espaignard" (or "Espaignart") with the way to pronounce it in English, this foreign word became "Spaignard".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Thank you, that was very interesting! Being honest, I had never been told that saying "I am Spanish" was wrong until not long ago, here in Duolingo. "Spaniard" is a word I have seen here and there, but I have seen "Spanish" lot more and, as you say, one is not Spanish if not from Spain, so I could not see how it would be confused with that?

So, after many people helping out with this (thank you all), I have come to the conclusion that both are fine:

I am Spanish / I am a Spaniard = Soy española.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

I know this is probably pretty old, but in case you don't have it quite straight yet:

“Spanish" is an adjective in “I am Spanish." The only times “Spanish" is a noun is if you mean either the language or the people of Spain as a whole. It is like saying “I am French" (French is an adjective here) vs “The French are a fascinating people." (French here is a noun referring to the entire group collectively).

This may not make sense from a French perspective (I'm not that far into French yet, so I don't know), but that's how the words are working in English.

I am Spanish. (Adjective, like “the apples are green" where “Spanish" functions like “green".)

The Spanish have an interesting history. (Noun, like “the apples are green" where “Spanish" functions like “apple".)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
Coayuco
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You are correct. You will find that many people in the US use the word "Spanish" to refer to anyone who speaks Spanish. Once in a while, you will even hear a Spanish speaking person refer to himself as Spanish even if he has no idea where Spain is. But the word properly used means someone from Spain. When someone says to me "you are Spanish", I correct them by saying, "I speak Spanish but I am Puerto Rican".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z-Rabbit
Z-Rabbit
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Curious: how would you say "ladies"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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It depends on context. Señoras, damas...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaronbennack

...son hermosas

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

... are very nice...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulValery0
PaulValery0
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It's makes no sense: duolingo accepts Spanish women as a translation but it doesn't accept 'international doctors' for Los doctores internacionales. Go figure!

1 year ago