"Han är uppe taket."

Translation:He is up on the roof.

January 4, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kounsh

can somebody explain the different uses of uppe, upp and uppför?

March 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/landsend

Uppe = Position, Upp = Direction, Uppför = Direction with an additional preposition, uphill

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jayagmon

Let's see if I got it correctly: when you talk about something or someone being in a certain place you'd use uppe / nere / ute / framme etc., while talking about something or someone moving in a certain direction you'd use upp / ned / ut / fram etc.?

September 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/landsend

Yes, that's it.

September 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olaf78

thanks so much for this!!!

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adamskiij

So following other rules I've seen, does "upside down" translate to "uppe nere"? Or is it something completely different because languages are weird?

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

'upside down' is uppochned (or uppochner, both ways are fine) in Swedish. I'd say both the English and the Swedish expression here are a bit weird, they're just idiomatic.

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ouzun

Is the table below correct? Could a native speaker comment? Tack!

Ner (direction): Down Nere (position): Down, below Ned direction): Down (formal) Nedför (direction): Downhill Upp (direction): Up Uppe (position): Up Uppför (direction): Uphill In (direction): In Inne (position): Inside, Indoors Inom (position): within Ut (direction): Out Ute (position): Outside, Outdoors

March 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaStorli

Excellent!

April 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kielimaksa

But isn't there danger on the roof?

August 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Ah, no cow on the ice!

July 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HansLovesIce

I have the impression the expression "cow on the ice" doesn't exist in english ;-)

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antonio_Sou

I'm trying to thing of a situation where upp is not directly related with verticality (or close to).

Is it the case that the use of upp/uppför is as simple as the degree of inclination in question?

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torowan

We've run into "dyker upp" (did I spell that right?) = "show up" = "aparecer" ... has nothing to do with the direction "up"; I am not sure why that is used in either Swedish or English. Or: "Se upp" ´= "look out" = "cuidado"

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

In English, “show up” is a phrasal verb with a meaning that is distinct from “show”, similar to the distinction between German auftauchen (“show up”, literally “up-dive”, similar to Swedish dyka upp) vs. tauchen (“dive”, Swedish dyka). Phrasal verbs are not as common in Romance languages as they are in Germanic languages.

July 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boddason

Varför inte: "atop of the roof"?

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mxlgreg

*on top of the roof, or (poetic) atop the roof

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluePrints3

Ah, I understand this better now

July 31, 2017
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