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  5. "D'ullmhaíomar na prátaí."

"D'ullmhaíomar na prátaí."

Translation:We prepared the potatoes.

January 5, 2015

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

Its funny how in the Irish course we get sentences like this one, and, of course, oibrionn na fir sna portaigh, whereas is in the French course they have sentences like elle est nue. I'm just saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConorHoughton

We prepared the spuds - rejected; it's hard not to use hiberno-English but it's often marked as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConorHoughton

They've accepted "we prepared the spuds" now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

My Dad had his own word: "murphies."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coconutlulz

It really seems to be geared towards Americans.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

One of my American friends pointed out that the only time she has ever been served 5 different types of potato at a single meal was in Ireland, so there may indeed be something to the notion that we're fond of our spuds. (There were roast potatoes, mashed potatoes, potatoes "au gratin", potato croquets, and some sort of chip/crisp as a garnish, if I recall correctly. Once it was pointed out to me, I noticed it on other occasions, particularly if there was a decent buffet).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Not always; examples like “petrol” and “sports hall” aren’t used in the States. (We use “spuds” here too, but only informally.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coconutlulz

You are certainly right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PookaGar

The Americanisms are pretty bizarrely distributed. In a perfect world, I suppose the questions would be clear enough and accepted answers broad enough to accommodate multiple dialects, but until then... well, report, report, report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Which is weird because "spuds" is pretty common in American English usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

French also has je suis une femme et tu es un garcon, but it just wouldn't have the same connotations if you put it in Irish, I don't think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Perhaps if Irish still had a formal/informal second person contrast, the connotations would approach those of French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrannan36

Did Irish once have a distinction between formal and informal second person? It is a very tricky thing to navigate as an English speaker meeting people in France. The rule I have used is to let them "tutoyer" you first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Classical Irish had the distinction, and modern Irish had retained it in the case of addressing clergy. One explanation for that was that a priest could have the Eucharistic host on his person, and thus one would be addressing both the priest and the body of Christ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrannan36

English also has "thee", "thou", "thy" and "thine" in church liturgy, but I know of no context where they would be used in everyday speech. Also I don't know whether they embodied a formal/informal meaning when they were part of the living language. I think they were simply second person singular forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prony-dH-Bray

Thee was informal, as the connection to their god(s) was supposed to be direct, unmediated, fraternal and equalitarian. How much has been forgotten!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

A brief historical summary for English can be found here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

The opposite thee/thou/thine were the familiar forms. Ye/you/your was originally formal in the singular but became universal, with 'ye' dying off in Standard English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

Scottish Gaelic retained that, and generalised it until they had the continental T/V distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmlfanning

Po-tay-toes! Boil 'em, mash 'em, stick 'em in a stew!

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