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  5. "Úsáidfimid d'uimhir ar an Ao…

"Úsáidfimid d'uimhir ar an Aoine."

Translation:We will use your number on Friday.

January 5, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen_87

Would it be possible to say "Úsáidfidh muid..." in order to be able to phonetically distingish between present and future tense? "Úsáidfimid" and "Úsáidimid" sound exactly the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

They are distinct anyways. In the future, the d is voiceless (sound it sounds like /t/). But yes, you can use usáidfidh muid, though those who do wouldn't use usáidimid anyways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen_87

True, but at least "úsáidfidh muid" and "úsaideann muid" are easier to distinguish.

By the way, will someone please tell me how I can use bold and italics in these comments? GRMA!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen_87

Well I just unintentionally discovered how to use italics by typing the * * . But I still don't know how to use bold.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Double "*" on either side.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I thought "ar an Aoine" meant on Fridays and "dé hAoine" on Friday. Is "ar an Aoine" in flux, and extending its meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

I thought "ar an aoine" meant on Fridays.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-Clai133496

Should " ar an Aoine " not be translated as "on Fridays" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1348

Not necessarily.

https://www.focloir.ie/ga/dictionary/ei/friday
"I'll see you on Friday" - feicfidh mé ar an Aoine thú
https://www.focloir.ie/ga/dictionary/ei/airlift
"the airlift of troops took place on Friday" - tharla aeraistriú na dtrúpaí ar an Aoine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkuecker1965

Am I to assume that this is saying, we'll ring you Friday, or what sort of number are they using Friday? I do so adore ambiguous sentences. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eleblob

I guess it could be a race number - someone running in place of the other person, and using their number. But yes, very ambiguous!

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