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  5. "Wir haben ein Kleid."

"Wir haben ein Kleid."

Translation:We have a dress.

July 24, 2013

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheRealDaveRuby

It sounded like she said " Wir haben ein flight'??? Am I the only one who heard this?

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lousiey

Nope

November 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xayookicookie

Thats how it was when we were young. Cold, hungry, living in a patched-up refridgerator box. All of us sharing one dress.

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyanCat

I'm not sure this is the right place to ask - but when do I use "einen" and when do I use "einem"?

July 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

The article ein has to be inflected according to the grammatical gender and case of the noun: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ein#Declension_2

You use einen in the accusative case for masculine nouns and einem for dative case and masculine or neuter nouns.

„Ich habe einen Hund.“ – „I have a dog.“

„Ich gebe das Futter einem Hund.“ – „I give the food to a dog.“

EDIT: corrected an error regarding the inflections. Thanks to the fellow Duolinguists for pointing out the mistake.

July 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefanoV1

I am only a beginner but I think there is a small mistake in your answer; "einen" in the accusative case is only for masculine and not also for neuter nouns.

Examples:

Ich habe einen Hund (M) (I have a dog)

Ich habe ein Pferd (N) (I have a horse)

:-)

Can please a German native correct me if I am wrong?

July 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Yes, there was an error. Thanks for pointing it out.

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eduardoRH9

Einen only applies for masculine nouns in accusative.

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Thanks for reporting. The error has been fixed.

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyanCat

Oh boy. This is confusing. Thank you for your answer! I guess my biggest problem is that I don't know what accusative / dative / etc means. English is not my mother tongue :( But your example sure helps.

July 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

I guess a comment here might not be enough to cover the grammatical cases of the German language, so I suggest you to read about their usage, for example here: http://german.about.com/library/blcase_sum.htm

BTW: Depending on your mother tongue your disadvantage might not be as big as you might expect. For example there is no dative case in English, either. I guess it all comes down to how easy it is to comprehend articles about the language's grammar. :-)

July 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyanCat

Wow, this article is about 9 pages long. I think I might need to quit Duolingo for a while just to read and completely understand it all :)

My mother tongue is Hebrew. Yeah... even I don't know what cases exist in that language. But I do hope the German grammar and I will get along eventually. Thanks for everything :)

July 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angie813925

Cases exist; they're described differently. In English we were taught nominative=subject, accusative=direct object, dative=indirect object; genitive=possessive.

May 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/basemosama

Nominativ -- Der -- Die --Das -- die Or Mein -- meine -- mein -- meine

Dativ -- dem -- der -- dem-- den

Or Meinem --meiner-- meinem --meinen

N.B takes the ending N.B Dativ comes after some prepositions such as mit and von

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hani.abosaid

Einen im akkusativ und einem im dativ

December 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobknox

Said the bride on "Say yes to the dress"

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ifeanyichu

I heard " Wir haben ein flight " could be a software bug

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaduGherha

Flight or schneit but never Kleid

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTo288

Do the Germans use the "Royal We" were we is used as an aggrandised form of "I"?

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ibins8

Not anymore since we have no royals anymore. But yes, the royals used to use it. And you could still use it in a humorous way.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elias9386

lolololololololololololololololololololololol

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elias9386
<h1>lol</h1>
March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roy.leihong

In French, the similiar sentence means "Each one of us have a dress." Could anyone please explain, is this the same in German? "We together only have ONE dress" , or "Each one of us have a dress"?

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

In German „Wir haben ein Kleid.“ would usually mean “We together have one dress.”

In some situations it can also have to the other meaning, but I can't think of any situation about a dress.
„Emma Stone und Damien Chazelle haben einen Oscar.“

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roy.leihong

Vielen Dank!

March 19, 2017

[deactivated user]

    Is "kleid" pronounced with a "t" ending?

    April 9, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ibins8

    No. I think they just tried to make the audio as clear as possible.

    July 15, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandra685175

    Good

    September 7, 2018
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