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Let's conjugate!

Why don't you teach conjugation of verbs? It's difficult for us old folks to pick up, just being corrected when we make a mistake.

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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I learned Spanish the traditional way, in a classroom with a textbook, conjugation tables, and having the rules explained to me.

I started learning French here on Duolingo with no prior knowledge. Like you, I think that I pick up the verbs more slowly the way Duo presents them, BUT I think there is a big payoff later, when you have enough language under your belt to start talking to yourself in simple sentences.

When I got to that stage in Spanish, if I wanted to say "He lives here" I would think to myself "Él vivo, vives, vive! Él vive aquí."

But in French I haven't acquired that habit of running through the conjugation tables and I just think to myself "Il vit ici." It's just right because it sounds right. Because that's what it means, not because that's where the verb lives in a table.

Now I definitely DO supplement the information Duo gives us. I do look at verb conjugation tables on WordReference.com, and I read about how verbs, articles, pronouns, and other parts of speech function in French on French.about.com. But I think Duo might be onto something with the way they're teaching. And don't be shy about using multiple resources. It really helps.

I don't know how old "old folks" are but I'm in my 50s. Not old, not young.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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What a great post! I couldn't agree more. Big upvote, a shiny lingot and two thumbs up for you Lrtward.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brendanashworth

Yes! Definitely! I learned my Spanish verb conjugación in school, and it took much longer to "feel right or wrong" in a sentence than when I learned German Konjugation with Duo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crlight
crlightPlus
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Very well said. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Resonance2001

I did a video series on conjugations which should help you. Unfortunately, it wasn't as popular as I would have liked for my work. Oh well. Here it is: http://youtu.be/BeqQuJsFJhk

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankietoni

I listened to your videos. You enunciated very clearly. It was a pleasure to listen to. They were very helpful! Thanks for sharing!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Resonance2001

Thank you for your kind comment

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
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A gem of a post that was posted a few days back. This should help clarify some of your doubts.
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6162231

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Echoing what other have said: the structure is there; if you need more information, there are myriad resources out there.

Also, when you hover over a Spanish verb, you'll get a green button that says "conjugate". Click that and a box will open with the conjugation table.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristinChile

hehehe . . . I am part of the Social Security crowd but I don't consider myself old, I just have a lot of notches in my belt. ggg

I took a year of Latin in high school. About all I remember from my Latin class was that nouns have gender and the basic conjugation of verbs.

When I started studying Spanish with the help of the Internet, I started a Spanish verb notebook. Every verb that I come across gets it own page. Yes, it can be done with a text file or word processing program but I find doing it by hand helps me learn them/

An example would be "hablo". I located "hablo" in my "Barron's 501 Spanish Verbs" book. It listed "hablar" as being the infinite form and means "to speak" or "to talk".

I fold my sheet of notebook paper in half with Spanish on the left and English on the right.

1st line - hablar to speak, to talk

next line - (from my 501 Verbs book) Regular -ar verb [this is where I note a stem change, etc.

Singulars

next line (1st person, singular) yo hablo I speak

next line (2nd person, singular, familiar) tú hablas you speak

next line (3rd person, singular) él, ella habla he, she, it speaks

next line (2nd person, singular, formal) usted habla you speak

Plurals next line (1st person, plural) nosotros, nosotras hablamos we speak

next line (2nd person, plural, familiar) ustedes hablan you all speak

next line (3rd person, plural) ellos, ellas hablan they speak

next line (2nd person, plural, formal) ustedes hablan you all speak

Hope this helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Well, there are always textbooks or the Internet available, if you see the need. Or you could "collect" and write out the conjugations from what Duo shows you. That would set verb forms in your mind.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skelkingur
skelkingur
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There's a quick explanation here: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/es/Verbs:-Present-1 and a nice introduction on studyspanish: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/regverb1.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/killary45
killary45Plus
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Have you tried the Language Transfer Complete Spanish Audio Course? It is totally free, and consists of 14.5 hours of excellent explanation of Spanish grammar rules and verb conjugations. You can download it onto a computer, tablet or other device.

The LT course is suitable for complete beginners, but I have being using Duo Spanish for over a year, and have studied Spanish off and on before that, but I found that the LT course was really useful for me. It is perhaps the total opposite of Duo since it is based on the idea that in order to remember something you need to understand it, so everything is explained very clearly before we are asked to answer any questions.

If you do try Living Language, then I suggest (despite what the teacher may say about not trying to remember) when you listen you have a notebook and pen and pause the lesson each time a question is asked , write down your answer and then press play to see if you are right. Like you I am not in the first flush of youth and find that it is necessary to go back over recently learned material to stop me forgetting it.

http://www.languagetransfer.org/#!blank/cbjz

I believe that after following the LT course you will find it a lot easier to work through Duo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria.x.li

Yeah, I just learned to conjugate verbs in class and before that I got all of the drop down questions wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JadeGypsi

Agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athletesrun

Check out pizquiz.com is you need help memorizing verbs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uroshu
uroshu
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I've found the following site extremely useful since it's the only one that offers pronunciation of over 35000 English, French, German, Italian and Spanish verb conjugation tables. Just type in the verb you would like to see conjugated and hear how each and every form of the verb of your choice is pronounced: http://conjugation.io/

4 months ago