1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Swedish
  4. >
  5. "Se upp för lekande barn!"

"Se upp för lekande barn!"

Translation:Watch out for playing children!

January 5, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zinitti

Common traffic sign in Sweden, especially near schools.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ffwarrior

Preferable to the English one 'Slow children at play/ playing.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3SfVXnZ0

Or "don't skid on a kid"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EduardoTerroso

This reminds me of a sign I've seen in different places and which sounds very weird to me: "levande barn" (http://www.fightplay.tv/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/FIGHTPLAY_levandebarn-548x409.jpg)

When you say "barn", isn't it implied that they are alive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapdeBurro

It might be a place where you can frequently find dead children on the road blocking the way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Charlotte--

Well then at least they don't have to install any speed bumps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It's a pun – the road sign's name is Lekande barn, but the idea is that everyone wants children to stay alive, so that they will still be Levande barn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mokane3562

Difference between "spela" and "leka"?

Also if it isn't already accepted, consider adding "children at play" to accepted translations. It's pretty much exclusively use on road signs though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

I am not sure if it's 100% equivalent but I learnt in Danish course that the equivalent lege and spille have different meanings as follows: the former refers to non-organised, spontaneous playing or fooling around or when you play with toys, it's also used for when you play a role, i.e. pretend to be someone; the latter on the other hand is used in all sorts of organised games with specific rules, such as table games or sports: hence a "player" of football is a "spiller" (and I guess in Swedish a spelare )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

That's right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Although Swedish uses "spela" and not "leka" for the meaning of playing a role.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelUare

Das "se upp" imply that you actually have to look upward to see the children?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, not at all. Good question, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelUare

Tack så mycket för din snabba svar!

Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.