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"I have to take the lamp from the desk."

Translation:Tengo que tomar la lámpara del escritorio.

5 years ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Scjoueur8

Why is "tomar" here? Doesn't that mean "to drink?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PedroDuo87
PedroDuo87
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Tomar can be, "to drink", " to take", "to consume", depending from the context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ziliya
ziliya
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So basically like the meaning of "take" in "take a pill"... Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

When do we use "tomar" and "llevar"????

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hbeasley1
hbeasley1
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Why is it "del escritorio" instead of "desde el escritorio"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa866214
lisa866214
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I have the same question.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Len_H
Len_H
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Why is it llevar here and not lleva, thank you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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Instead of thinking llevar means to take think of it more as to carry or to take [somewhere].
In this case, the lamp is being removed from the desk, but not necessary being carried or taken someplace.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hbeasley1
hbeasley1
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Because when one verb is used after another, only the first is conjugated. In this case, the verbs tener and llevar become "Tengo que llevar" instead of "Tengo que lleva" or "Tener que lleva", both of which would make no sense.

Furthermore, lleva means "it takes" whereas llevar means "to take". If you want to say "I have to take" then only "Tengo que llevar" would make sense (or "Tengo que tomar").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiInFlight

How do we distinguish 'I have to take the lamp from the desk' from 'I have to take the desk lamp' here? Is it assumed because tomar means 'to take [somewhere]' and movement from one place to another is a necessary part of the statement?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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“The desk lamp“ could be “la lámpara de escritorio“, in general any desk lamp.
I‘d like to know if you in English say just “the lamp from the desk“ to refer to it and its usual location (a specific, determined desk) as “La lámpara del escritorio“ can mean in Spanish. Maybe “the desk‘s lamp“ ? Otherwise, it'd look like a truncated sentence in Spanish; one thinking... where to?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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In English, "desk lamp" is a type of lamp and "lamp from the desk" would be any type of lamp sitting on the desk.
In seems from your explanation that it is a difference of "de escritorio" (of desk) and "del escritorio" (from the desk).
¿Verdad?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoSassi
GuidoSassi
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"De" means both "of" and "from" the meaning depends on context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenJones69022

Come on, necesito isnt accepted here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qwertyminecraft

what does debo mean???????

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hbeasley1
hbeasley1
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Debo = I should

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qwertyminecraft

thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0664060

Debo means I should

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

also, "I ought..."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louisvh1

'sacar' seems to mean 'take out', does this mean take out as on a date or more as 'remove'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sten649720

"Tengo que tomar la lámpara del escritorio" was wrong. Why? :(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

It istn't (May 2017)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerekBetz

Coger is in one of the incorrect options. I know that it means to grab/obtain (right?) but I've been told to NEVER use the word outside España because people mainly use it sexually. Am I wrong? Is there ever a case where it's OK to use Coger?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tesscc

coger also mean to take

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanine
Jeanine
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So when is que required before the infinitive and when not?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

'tener que + infinitve' is an expression for 'to have to do' something. Gotta have the 'que' if that is your intended meaning

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vjamieson

Thank you, that helps

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swomack

I would think that "quitar" could also be used here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/farkydoodle

I tried that, too. Anyone know why it isn't accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cheetah328

I am also confused about this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavanandhukuri

How do you say "i have to take a lamp for the desk" then?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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Tengo que llevar una lámpara para el escritorio. I believe.
“Para“ meaning “suitable for“ or “to, towards“. “For“ meaning either as well? Or I didn't understand...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sherylw
sherylw
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Tomar does not sound correct for the context of this sentence. Llevar makes better sense "to carry away."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arlene434972

I just get ina hurry and distracted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyle_Frank

Is there a reason "Yo" is not before "tengo"? I understand "tengo" is already conjugated in "yo" form, but how do you know if you need to put the people/person/thing you are referring to before the conjugated verb?

(I'm sorry if I worded this weirdly)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

You have to use the personal pronoun if you think it is very important that the person to whom you are speaking understands what you mean, or to emphasise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dancingnancie

Could you use necesito instead?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninjosh92

Tomar is a funny word to use here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/berniegreening
berniegreening
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I wrote "tengo" and it was marked wrong. Correction said it should have been "debo". However, when I put my curser over "I have to" - Tengo was one of the options!!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uinni
uinni
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berniegreening, "tengo QUE tomar" = 'debo tomar" = "I {have to | must} take"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelle596621

Why was "lámpara" deemed incorrect, and "farol", a word I had never seen before, the correct answer. Even clicking on the word 'lamp' to see a drop down list of translations only yielded 'lámpara'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdmoffet

What is the difference between debe and tengo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grrrr19
grrrr19
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So what is the difference between he and tengo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uinni
uinni
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I think "sacar" should be accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giga27beast

Sacar would be incorrect because it means something more like "to take out."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uinni
uinni
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giga27beast, I must have been drunk when I wrote that post... :D :D

9 months ago