"Mannen klipper snöret."

Translation:The man cuts the string.

January 6, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SummerSolemnly

Why is "clip" not an acceptable translation of "klipper"?

November 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCarls11

Good question - it's good English and was borrowed from Old Norse with exactly that meaning (as opposed to clip meaning to attach, which came from Old English clyppen).

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TimDaw1

... interesting, and in NE Scotland, Shepherds still talk of clipping wool from a sheep. Surprising how many of the words in that dialect make more sense in Swedish than standard English.

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MarksAaron

Yeah, "the man clips the string" sounds a bit specific and/or more informal, but I believe it should be an acceptable translation.

January 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Hear snöret pronounced by a native speaker here: http://sv.forvo.com/search-sv/sn%C3%B6ret/

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pluckingstrings

Why is this not "mannen klipper i snöret?"

July 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

"klipper i snöret" sounds as if he is not cutting it in two pieces, which would be natural if he cuts a string, right?

July 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pluckingstrings

OK, so in that other sentence that was something like "han klipper i papperet," the "klipper i" would be used kind of like "cuts into" or "makes a cut in" in English?

July 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

I'd say that you'd use "klipper i" for anything that you couldn't cut into two pieces in just one cut.

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/g.uh

what ?

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BertBerw

Nice one. I've been searching for a good explanation such as this one.

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Agneseinthenorth

can "snöret" be a rope as well? As a Latvian native speaker, "snöre" sounds very close to Latvian "šņore", which means cord or rope - a thick string, generally speaking.

August 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EmelieTG

since snöre means string (could be translated as lace as well, like shoelace, "skosnöre") it can't really be a word used for rope since ropes are bigger, although the words are very similar "rep" is a better word for rope :) hope that helped!

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DSignerD

I translated it as : 'the man cuts the thread' To my feeling that sounded more natural compared to string... Maybe because I just 'cut all threads' with my homecountry to move to Sweden :D

January 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

I feel like a string is thinner than a rope but thicker than a thread. Either way a thread is "en tråd" in Swedish.

April 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/steverandall7

What is the difference between klipper and skär?

September 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EmelieTG

Klipper is something you do with scissors meanwhile skär is to cut somethings with knifes or as Dee_Dee432 said, like an injure-cut but then you say it in past tense ex. I cut myself is jag skar mig.

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/steverandall7

Tack!

October 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee_Dee432

I think that skär means to sort of like injure-cut, like getting a paper cut or something

October 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Peroznio

Does this carry any idiomatic meaning at all? I could imagine it having ties to the English "cut the cord" or perhaps to the Dutch "knoop doorhakken (cut through the knot) -- (which means to make a decision).

October 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LionessOfGod

ahhh... i love the swedish word for cuts......klipper..

March 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KteCMHkt

Clipping and cutting is interchangeable. I can get my hair cut, and I can get it clipped -- same meaning.

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MariekeGro

In Dutch snor is mustashe, so it was so logical for me to say that the man was cutting the mustache. Sometimes knowing a lot of similar languages is confusing

November 12, 2017
Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.