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  5. "Hon dricker vatten."

"Hon dricker vatten."

Translation:She drinks water.

January 6, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZL321

Dang, I keep writing 'drikker' :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MolagBal333

Cause of Danish eh? Happens to me too, jag to jeg etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZL321

Yup. Haha, I'll get over it someday. :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleAn938287

Same here, well, because I am danish, also "hon" to "hun" and "kvinna" to "kvinde"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/debkumarda2

It will happen natuarally.i think practice shall correct it hopefully.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaysa1928

Wouldn't "vatten" technically translate to "the water," just as "katten" and "trädet" translate to "the cat" and "the tree"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

No, actually vatten is an ett-word and it looks like that. Don’t be fooled by the -en which is not an ending here. The definite form is vattnet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaysa1928

Ah, I see. Tack så mycket!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McCarlitox444

Swedish is easy, because the language are part of the Germanic Languages (English, Swedish, Nordic, Finnish, Icelandic, German, Afrikaans, Dutch)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MischaH

me be like: hon drikker wat dan

lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob0904

Is it the same for the present continuous tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

Based on my barely existent experience with the rest of the scandinavian languages, I think so :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raghdamal

How to differentiate between the en and the ett words??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

Maybe this could help: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_grammar

Some of it: Swedish nouns and adjectives are declined in genders as well as number. Nouns belong to one of two genders – common for the en form or neuter for the ett form – which also determine the declension of adjectives. For example, the word fisk ("fish") is a noun of common gender (en fisk)

Nouns have one of two grammatical genders: common (utrum) and neuter (neutrum), which determine their definite forms as well as the form of any adjectives and articles used to describe them. Noun gender is largely arbitrary and must be memorized; however, around three quarters of all Swedish nouns are common gender. Living beings are often common nouns, like in en katt "a cat", en häst"a horse", en fluga "a fly", etc.

:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VANDANA561671

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