1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Swedish
  4. >
  5. "Vi väljer den stora lunchen."

"Vi väljer den stora lunchen."

Translation:We choose the big lunch.

January 7, 2015

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrMarien

Why stora? Lunchen is singular right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philski94

I've been wondering the same, my guess is it's 'stora' because 'we' = plural. If it was "I choose the big lunch" perhaps it would be 'stor' then. Don't quote me on this, just my attempt at making sense of it. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

No, it's because it's definite. The definite form of the adjective is the same for en and ett words:
en stor lunch - den stora lunchen
ett stort äpple - det stora äpplet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

So it would be like den trötta pojke? The little boy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewlilja

Den trötta pojken — The tired boy. You still need the definite form of the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

Ok thanks I understand... double article basically. And oops, little was a typo, I saw lilla above and changed it to make sure I had it down. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrMarien

Thanks for replying! And does this mean defenite adjectives are always in their 'plural' form or just this particular one/is it something we are gonna learn about?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

There are just a few exceptions, notably liten will be lilla in the definite and små in the plural. But they are nearly always the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/majorkkevin

Why is it stora and not stor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

Stora is both for plural and definite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/majorkkevin

Yeah makes more sense now that ive seen other adjecrives tack!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefanSoleder

Is "en lunch" actually lunch? I thought it meant dinner, something you eat in the evening as opposed to "en middag" as lunch in the middle of the day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, lunch is 'lunch', and middag is 'dinner' and is not eaten in the middle of the day.
There is some regional variance in how the words are used Swedish just as there is in English, but this is the standard system these days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

I think, in English at least, dinner is the main meal of the day, whereas supper is always the evening meal. For example someone may invite you for Sunday dinner, in which case the noon meal being the main meal of the day would be referred to as dinner. However in most other cases I would always think of dinner as being the evening meal, since it is usually the main meal of the day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

In Swedish, middag is the main meal of the day, and then there's kvällsmat in the evening if you eat a lighter meal at that point. (as I said this is the standard usage, so it's a simplified picture, but this is how most people use the words).

Most people eat middag after work, maybe an hour or two after coming home from work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

Alright thanks, that makes sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geetou

because it is "the" lunch, so definite, therefore "stora". Had it been an indefinite lunch, "a lunch", it would be "stor"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eloquence_

fun fact: "Stora" is how we address teachers in Portugal :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoqueen13

I'm confused as to why "dem" was necessary if the object is articulated as "lunchen". Any insight?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It's because when it's an adjective + a definite noun, we (usually) need an article before that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

There are some names and similar things where you don't need it. Like, Glada änkan, 'The merry widow'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unfetteredferret

so the black widow sounds a lot like the black duck in Swedish, eh? :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Not to native speakers – ä and a are completely different letters and have different sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GWYNNETHHAUXWELL

So New York would be "Det Stort Äpplet" _


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lord_zulo

Nope, 'äpplet' is in definite form here => stora. 'New york är ett stort äpple' would use 'stort', here 'äpple' is in singular indefinite form => stort


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dawid.paszko

Stora/stor/stort how to know wich of them should be used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

Stora is for plural and definite nouns. Stort is for ett words. Stor is for en words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina931729

Why great instead of big is not accepted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

I think in this sentence "great" would make you think of a tasty lunch, not a big one. I admit I'm not a native English speaker but in this case I don't think using "great" to describe a big lunch sounds very natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esmeroad

It says 59 comments but then there are none


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

Problems on mobile.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefski85

How can you tell when to use the different types of "stor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saucecode

Take a look at the wiktionary article and open up the Inflection Table. I use wiktionary for most new words I come across - its a great resource!

It will tell you that stor & stort are for describing singular en & ett words, and stora is for describing plural and definite nouns. In this sentence, lunchen is definite.

Ett stort bord / A large table
En stor lunch / A big lunch
Den stora lunchen / The big lunch
De stora luncerna / The big lunches

(If I got something wrong please point it out).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrorReshef20

why using stora when it stands for plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's also the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrieleIn15

Why is it stora and not stor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiccoleWeb

I understand that "lunchen" is needed because it's "the lunch." But why is "den" needed? Is it just a quirk of Swedish grammar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Swedish always requires an article or a pronoun whenever you have an adjective describing a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderR152794

Why is there a plural here? Stora not stor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's also the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaBell6

Why is stora the right option here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zoltan432254

Why stora? It is not plural. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's also the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrankoSpirovski

Isn't the word "stora" for plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, and for definites.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chinual

Why is "den" the definite article here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Because lunch is an en-word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewMarg12

Why is it lunchen amd not lunch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That's the definite form.

  • lunch = lunch
  • the lunch = lunchen

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasBaldoCasa

Isn't stora for plural? Is 'the lunch' plural in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Swedish adjectives usually have the same form for plural and definite. In this case, it's the definite, but it's a single lunch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dario69420

'Den' means 'The' but the 'en' in 'lunchen' also means the, are they both necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes: whenever you have an adjective describing a noun, you need either an article or a possessive. And whenever you use an article with an adjective describing a noun, all three need to be either definite or indefinite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristinSmi568325

Luncheon ought to equal lunch in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/domshoe

So is stora the word for the definite words like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Probably, but could you please explain more specifically what you mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/domshoe

So if you were using the definite form of big in Swedish, would it be stora


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yep, that is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColineDubaux

Why stora here and not stor ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

stora is the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meam234630

For definite form is like plural right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The definite form of an adjective is normally the same as the plural, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samarpita12

Can it be 'vi väljer den stor lunchen'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

stor is the indefinite form, but lunchen is in the definite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmadHasna4

Why do we use Stora in this sentence? Shouldn't we just use "stor"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's the definite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/username8891

I thought that in cases where we use adjective + definite noun with en-words the adjective should remain in the singular


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's in the definite. The definite and the plural is almost always the same for adjectives. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deio251646

We choose the large luncheon --- sorry, lunch is short for luncheon, I don't use it myself, preferring dinner, but if I have to use it, then luncheon as in luncheon meat, is just as good as a lunch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deio251646

We choose the large dinner is correct. I am neither posh nor from the South of the UK. So, breakfast, dinner, tea, maybe push the boat out, supper as well. As a 'gut' feeling, appropriate here, dinner is probably said by more people in the UK as a whole than poncy lunch. I have lived in England, Scotland and Wales. Dinner is more often used than lunch. If I wanted to be posh, I would say 'lunchen'. Also big dinner, is inelegant, so if you are going to up registers, then large dinner. Here ends the rant, I'm off for my brecky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The problem with accepting "dinner" for lunch is that it will benefit a very small number of people, while accidentally teaching the wrong meaning to a vastle larger number of other people. However, whether it's posh or not, every native English speaker understands the meaning of "lunch". So it really is the least bad option.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deio251646

Thank you for the reply. I don't agree. There are a significant number of speakers of an English who prefer dinner to lunch, and is understood for such. I take your point you may not wish to script for every possibility, din-dins...etc So let the dominance of the dialect of Southern Saxon continue. I was not asking you to use 'dinner' for lunch, but only that 'dinner' is accepted as a correct answer by those who use this term for the midday meal. Call it lunch/lunchen, but accept that 'dinner' is used by a significant number of people, friends in both Oz and New Zealand do use it too, let alone Ireland, where I also lived. I'm away for mi dinner. Tack bra


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlutch

Is it "stora" instead of "storen" because it's definitive since there is the definitive article "den", correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, it's stora in the definite and that's the reason for the definite article as well.

Note that the indefinite is stor, and storen doesn't exist.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samuelnhenson

Why is this look like "we choose the big the lunch"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samuelnhenson

Why does this look like "we choose the big the lunch."

Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.