"Wij hebben haar."

Translation:We have her.

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jioosting

Who is Duolingo holding hostage?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skylar588051

LOL!! Thank you for making me laugh!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andre403225

For reall boyy god bless youu ahahah you make me laugh soo damm hardd

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LennyHodge

Ty y . ?.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sasho
sasho
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Can this be translated as "We have hair"? Would it be correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
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Yep.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frederickrosa

So there's no hostage?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sg1123

It sounds like a kidnapping

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scull1

She has been taken

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/surya-sun

I thought the "haar" here is the replacement of "it" just like hem...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Are you referring to the use of hem instead of het when referring to gendered nouns in the object/accusative case ? For example:

Heb je de appel? -- "Do you have the apple?"

Ja, ik heb hem. -- "Yes I have it."

Heb je het boek? -- "Do you have the book?"

Ja, Ik heb het. -- "Yes I have it."

Heb je de taart? -- "Do you have the cake?"

Ja, Ik heb haar. -- "Yes I have it."


Appel = Masculine

Boek = Neuter

Taart = Feminine


In Standard Dutch the Masculine and Feminine differentiation has generally dissolved into a single gender: Common gender

However within some Flemish dialects, and other various dialects around the border between The Netherlands and Belgium, the differentiation between Masculine and Feminine nouns is still productive.


As this Duolingo course highlights Standard Dutch, there are often only two genders: Common (Masculine and Feminine) and Neuter.

Thus, in the example above involving taart, you would commonly hear/see the object pronoun hem used instead of haar -- even though the grammatical gender of taart is feminine.


Furthermore, this question would generally mean We have her or We have hair. The former may be slightly more common -- as the latter would likely include additional words to indicate/provide context that haar is referring to hair and not to the object pronoun her. An example may be:

Beiden baby's hebben haar. -- "Both babies have hair."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csmeister

Duo you need to let her go.

2 months ago
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