1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Tá an Meiriceánach i Meirice…

" an Meiriceánach i Meiriceá."

Translation:The American is in America.

January 7, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkuecker1965

A bit redundant

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

Well, thanks for that, Captain Obvious.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffFoster14

Only the one is there? Where are all the others?

October 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

Does "Meiriceá" only refer to the US or all of America?

January 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzxj

I've only heard it used to refer to the US, but apparently it can mean either, same as in English.

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevmur

The United States are na Stáit Aontaithe.

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

All of it, not just the United States, same as in English. e.g. Meiriceá Theas = South America.

January 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronKBrown

It refers to either one, as in English.

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

How do you say "there is an American in America"?

June 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzxj

Tá Meiriceánach i Meiriceá.

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felix102035

no sh#t sherlock

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rentriki

Why do you use different prepositions for "i Meiriceá" and "sa Ghearmáin"?

January 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Most countries require the definite article. Meiriceá is one of the five big ones (though there are others) that don't, along with Éirinn (Éire), Albain, Sasana, and Ceanada

January 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

A little over half of all country names are always preceded by the singular definite article an, while the rest have no article: see list. There is no way to predict which ones require the an; this must be learned off by heart when you meet a new country name.

January 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevmur

Just to complete galaxyrocker's and lancet's explanation - the words "i" (meaning "in") and "an" (meaning "the") contract into the single word "sa" when they occur together. So "sa" translates into English as "in the".

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jake746269

Here is The American, in his natural environment.

November 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stmonkeydoom

Makes sense

May 17, 2019

Related Discussions

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.