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  5. "Baineann tú díot do hata."

"Baineann díot do hata."

Translation:You take your hat off.

January 7, 2015

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fgalla

Could/should this be accepted - "You take your hat off you"?

I was wondering could you then use it to make the following distinctions.

Baineann tú díom do hata. - "You take your hat off me"

Baineann tú de do hata. - "You take your hat off him"

etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yep. You're exactly right. The de + pronoun is who you're taking the hat off of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeaininMC

I agree with your two Irish examples. Regarding your question about the acceptable translation, it might be literal, but would we actually say that? You take your hat off you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mmelosh

You could say, "You take your hat off you and put it on him" as a stage direction, for example. I don't really see using it alone, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laois4lyf

How come in the previous sentence(bainnean se a chota de - he takes off his coat) the "de" comes after the possessive article and noun, however in this sentence the "diot" comes before the possessive article and the noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Because multiple people were involved in creating the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laois4lyf

I understand that, however which one way of saying it would be more common? (diot/ de before or after the possessive article and noun)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Much like English, where you can say "You take off your hat" or "you take your hat off", both Baineann tú díot do hata and Baineann tú do hata díot occur in modern Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laois4lyf

Ah okay cool, thanks for clearing it up Knocksedan :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayMonaghan

The answer I have been searching for. Thanks, Knocksedan!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N.Hilary

Thank you. You have answered my question. 'Baineann tu do hata diot' and 'Baineann tu diot do hata' are equally correct. The previous exercise was for the phrase: 'Baineann sibh bhur gcotai dibh'. Ergo the confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FauxShizzle

Is "Baineann tú do hata díot" equivalent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sbn90

I'd like to know that, too. Sometimes the preposition comes after the object, sometimes before it. Is there a rule to that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

No; in the case of a phrasal verb like bain de, the preposition of a phrasal verb, even in a prepositional pronoun form, precedes the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stmonkeydoom

Other examples in this lesson do take that form, though. What am I missing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1449

You're not missing anything, In fact, the FGB entry for the phrasal verb bain de prefers to put the preposition after the object, except for the imperative, and some cases of the saorbhriathar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardMik2

What is the difference between tógann and baineann?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sleepypie

tógann is the verb to take and baineann is the verb to take off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Bain itself isn't the verb for "take off". It's * bain de. Bain* by itself means something else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

What does it mean by itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHu5Lz

This is not translated as "Take off your hat." because that is a command, correct? This must be translated as "You take off your hat"--the non-command form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexinIreland

Yes, the imperative (command form) would be different. Bain díot do hata would be the imperative form (Take off your hat).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janmetdepet

Tig leat do hata a fhágáil ort.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

Go raibh maith agat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KellyManni3

err... this is a different word order to one i saw a few minutes ago about someone taking their coat off and another taking their shoes off. This skill is hard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

English also allows two word orders here: "you take your hat off" and "you take off your hat".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KellyManni3

Yes, but it only allows one. It marked me wrong when I wrote the other. Maybe it was wrong to do that, I just assumed it's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fleeny

Well Tom Jones certainly likes to leave HIS hat on ....https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5GyI8S9VRT8


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

slightly off topic but how would I write/say "Hold on to your hat " - as per a current song.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harrycline

Is this not a description of action, but an imperative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1449

Baineann tú díot do hata - "You take your hat off" is the description of an action.

The imperative is bain díot do hata! - "take off you hat!"

If you were addressing more than one person, you would say bainigí díbh bhur hataí.

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