"There still was bread and wine."

Translation:Aún quedaba pan y vino.

5 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/queenofscotts

Why not "Hubo todavía pan y vino?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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I'm not sure I can answer this, but since this was a lesson on imperfect tense, perhaps they were going for "había".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1rjU9yOO

I was marked correct for "todavia había pan y vino".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wonderboy6
Wonderboy6
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Can someone please answer this ^^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

queenofscotts - I have the same question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DolevFreun

Once again - context.

Aún quedaba pan y vino: could also mean "used to be". When the prohibition began, I thought they would cut the wine for good, but even then there still was bread and wine

Hubo todavía pan y vino: I was late to the party, but by the time I got there there still was bread and wine.

Can a native speaker approve this?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donna.scha

"Still there was remaining bread and wine" when you translate it literally. I think the singular form of the verb is used because if you replace the bread and wine with "something", "something" not "somethings" works. Or an alternative word for the subject would be "the food" or "the meal", both of which are singular nouns that can describe a collection of items. The singular form of the verb feels more natural.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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See SFJuan's answer below.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hucknoog
hucknoog
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Why is this this singular? Shouldn't "pan y vino" require "quedaban"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SFJuan

When 'quedar' is used to mean 'there is left' it seems to follow the same pattern as when 'haber' (hay/haya/hubo/había/habrá) is used to mean 'there is'. The plural verb forms are not used even when referring to plural nouns.

There was an apple = Había una manzana

There was an apple left = Quedaba una manazana

There were two apples = Había dos manzanas

There were two apples left = Quedaba dos manzanas

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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SFJuan - Thank you!!! You have cleared up a stubborn source of confusion for me! I did not realize that quedar was being used like haber for 'there is', and the singular aspect zipped past me before. Two lingots for you!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

It seems to make sense that it would be plural, but yet the English uses singular and it sounds weird to say "there still were bread and wine".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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This is indeed odd, because if you rearrange the words, 'Bread and wine WERE still there', it sounds right but with a slightly different meaning. I'm puzzled, too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alystra2

Take out the word "still" for a moment. "There were bread & wine" is correct, so "there still were bread & wine" is also correct. "There were two things" not "there is two things."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Yes, plural verb needed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

Why not "había pan y vino todavia"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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I said the same thing. It seems to me it should be correct. Not sure why it was marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kevmur
kevmur
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Since there are two subjects in this sentence shouldn't the verb take the plural form 'quedaban'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

I agree and think this needs a plural verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/takyon42

hmm...maybe I was mistaken...I think just the slight connotative difference between 'There was still' and 'There still was' in English threw me off...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-

What is the connotative difference between "There was still" and "There still was"? I don't perceive any difference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheClark
TheClark
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There was something that was not moving and there was something there nonetheless

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ezzy429
ezzy429
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I feel like there's a difference, but I can't explain it. I think I would be much more likely to phrase something as "There was still...", but I almost wonder if this is an effect of present tense contractions (I would say "There's still" in the present tense, so it feels more natural to keep the "still" after the verb in other tenses.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdecutler
bdecutler
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I think I can address three of the concerns going on here.

First, for those of you using a form of haber (hubo and había), this is a construction called (at least in English) the empty or expletive subject. In English, it uses there as the subject with the best verb conjugated based on the predicate nominative (is or was for singular, are or were for plural) . So, it follows that in Spanish, it would be hubieron or habían for bread and wine. However, this rule is not always followed in English, as you'll hear many people saying things like There's apples on the table.

Second, for those of you wondering about ya and todavía, I have read many dictionary entries and translations as well as asked native speakers about these two words, and there seems to be no definitive rule. However, I do find that todavía tends to be used more in negative constructions like Él todavía no viene Or Él no ha venido todavía. Ya seems to be used more to show the present, even when we wouldn't say still, yet, or already in English, such as Ya no hay. Duolingo used aún (though) in this sentence, which seems to suggest a contrast, but without more context, I don't think that is the only clear option. I put ya and will petition for it to be corrected.

For the first person (yo) versus third person (el/ella/Usted) haber is never used in first person for the empty/expletive construction, only for compound verb tenses that correspond to have in English, such as Yo he caminado (I have walked). If you are using the imperfect, it is the same in both first and third person singular. So hubo, había, or quedaba would all be correct if you are speaking in the singular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alystra2

I think I get were you're coming from on "ya" & "todavía." It's not always so clear, & probably varies by region.

In the area where I learned to speak Spanish, people would say "todavía no ha venido" but "ya no viene". I once tried to say "there's still ice cream at home" as "Ya hay helado en la casa," but that didn't make sense. That meant "there's already ice cream at home." What I needed to say was "todavía hay helado..."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdecutler
bdecutler
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You have a good point. The distinction seems subtle and arbitrary at times. Just out of curiosity, where did you learn Spanish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Would it be OK to drop out "aun", given that "quedaba" = "there still was"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/takyon42

The translation given by duolingo means "there was still'.

Reported the problem. Or maybe Google translate is wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naylor1993
Naylor1993
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Is it common to say "todavia habia"? I know it's correct but it sounds bad to my ear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whitebabe
whitebabe
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What is wrong with? "Todavia era el pan y el vino."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

There is no 'there' in your sentence. Still was bread and wine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Not only is there puzzlement about plural vs singular, DL says the correct answer should be the YO form. Now I'm REALLY confused. Reported

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/syllikb
syllikb
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What's wrong with "quedaba aún pan y vino"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmurp7748

Why not Allí aún fuera pan y vino

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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I believe "allí" means "there" in the sense "over there", indicating a place. I believe that in this sentence "there" is used in the sense of "there exists". So, "allí" would not be a correct translation for "there" in this sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Terry716536

Tired of missing these and finding not one translation given is the actual word used, why is that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidG430

why not: Toda villa quedaba pan y vino. It is identical to the accepted answer except for toda villa in place of aun.

1 year ago
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