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"Todavía eres joven."

Translation:You are still young.

5 years ago

89 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tminderhout
tminderhout
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could someone explain the different usage of aun and todavia, please?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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they are used interchangeably

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tminderhout
tminderhout
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thank you droma

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidmalt

What is the problem with " Still, you are young". I cannot see.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KBurn289

You're changing the meaning by using it in that way.

"You are still young" = you were young before and you are young now. Translation: todavía

"Still, you are young" = and yet you are young; all the same, you are young. It's part of a longer idea. For example: "You are making many mistakes with your life. Still, you are young (and might change in the future)." In Spanish, I believe you could say: "Sin embargo, eres joven."

Hope this helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie7511

thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjriera

"You are young still" doesn't work? argh. Lost the level on the last translation due to that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdchaygdal

I´m also wondering why ¨You are young still.¨ doesn´t work. Is it very different from ¨You are still young.¨? I view the two sentences as nearly the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vega.marle
vega.marle
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Es lo mismo tanto en inglés como en español, y también me quito una vida, muy mal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miwade

What do you mean? Vega.marle "take my life, very bad"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/steven.l.medina

It took one of his lifes, one of the hearts.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vega.marle
vega.marle
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Bueno un corazón ;/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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You guys agreeing with davidmalt should just upvote his thing. No need to clutter the thread.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emerald.Isle

What determines the adverb placement in Spanish sentences? Could it be correctly written "Eres todavía joven"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicholas.Brooks

Can someone answer this thread lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chick_a_dee

What about "you are young yet"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hajrgelavkjfd

I'm not a native english speaker so I'm not completely sure, but isn't 'yet' mostly used in negative sentences(like 'you're not old enough to determine your sexuality yet')?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

I write this but does not work. It is wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KBurn289

Yes, it's wrong in this context. Still is used for something that began to happen in the past and still happens now. Yet is used for something we expect to happen that that hasn't begun already.

Example: "It is September. Polly will turn 18 in October. It is still September, so Polly is still 17. It isn't October yet, so Polly isn't 18 yet."

Note the positive and negative constructions and the different standard placement of these adverbs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GintareKim

Although ´todavía´can be translated as both ´still´and éven´, the meanings are very different. How do you guys know what the other person means when s/he uses that word?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Along the same lines as GintareKim's question, "todavia" can translate as "yet," but "Yet you are young" is considered incorrect. Is there a way--other than memorizing a hundred instances--to know the correct translation for a given sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milkiw

I think you can only use "yet" when there is a negation as "not yet". That's what I understood from WR.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Upon reflection, I don't believe this is true. Certainly a majority of the example sentences on spanishdict.com translate "todavía" as "yet" when in the negative, but the few positive examples demonstrate this cannot be a universal rule (e.g. "He may yet succeed" = "todavía puede que lo consiga"). Logic would say that since "yet" as an adverb isn't used solely in the negative in English, it would not become so when translating anything from Spanish.

I've come to the conclusion that "yet" would be a correct option, but it's just not one DL has accepted at this point. Though "yet" and "still" have a variety of differing connotations and usages, both can also act as adverbs meaning "at the present time," which seems to be how "todavía" is being used here. Admittedly, I can see now how "yet" at the beginning of the sentence is a poor choice since it might lead a reader to assume it acts as a conjunction, but I believe "yet" would be an acceptable synonym when placed in the middle or at the end of the sentence: "You are yet/still young" / "You are young yet/still."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KBurn289

Your logic is still incorrect.

"He may yet succeed" - it's a positive sentence, but also a conditional sentence. It means that he hasn't succeeded up until now, but maybe he will in the future. It is still expressing the idea that something which we expect to happen in the future hasn't happened as of now. We could also use 'will' in a similar way: "He will learn Spanish yet", but it's quite uncommon.

'Still' means it started in the past and continues to happen now. 'Yet' and 'still' are absolutely not interchangeable here. You cannot legitimately use 'yet' with the simple present tense, as you are suggesting. It needs to be used with the present perfect, future, or conditional tenses.

Hence "he is yet young" is very bad English and patently incorrect, as is "he is young yet", while "yet, he is young" means something totally different. 'Yet' is a connector in this clause. In Spanish, you would say something like: "Sin embargo, él es joven". You would not use 'todavia'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

I will grant you that "He may yet succeed" isn't talking about the present and as such is a poor example of "yet" used in the sense of "at the present time"--though notice the paragraph break; I had meant to make a separate point: first that it could be used in a positive sense, period, and second, (and I see I didn't provide sufficient present-tense support) that despite being uncommon, I don't believe it's necessarily wrong, as dictionary.com seems to agree. Now, perhaps its use is a peculiarity of certain dialects (I'm from Kansas), but I've heard more than one person say or write things like "You're young yet; you'll see what I mean when you're older." or "You've got time yet to get that done." In certain contexts, it sounds normal and correct to me, if on the informal side.

I think it's okay to disagree on this point. :) Experts still can't agree on how many spaces to put between sentences, whether to use the Oxford comma, and whether "tho" (with or without an apostrophe) is an acceptable spelling variation for "though" (despite poets using it for over a century). Brits like to talk about lifts and tellies, Australians talk about barbies and capsicum--I think English speakers are entitled to different opinions about a word like "yet."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

From what I read on spanishdict.com, "todavía" means something like "at the present time" or "above/more so." Thus, "even" only appears as a translation for "todavía" and "aún" when it acts as a synonym for "yet," "still," "even now," or "even more." E.g. "Even faster/better/more easily" (note that "still/yet faster" keeps the same meaning) or "Even now, you could still change your mind" (again, this is nearly synonymous with "Yet, you could still change your mind.") Thus, to decide if we can translate "todavía" as "even," we must ask ourselves if "even" would have the same sense as "yet" or "still." In this case, the answer is no:

"Even you are young" --Here, "even" seems to compare the person to others who are also young, as in "I seem to be the only old person here--even you are young!"

"You are even young" and "You are young, even." --Placed in the middle or at the end, "even" seems to imply the person's youth is added to another attribute, as in "You have osteoporosis? But you're so healthy--and you are young, even!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LearninLis

Would you be allowed to say Eres todavia joven? (with the acento, of course.) And if not, why not? Is it just not common?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pauldev

I agree that it should also accept: Still you are young

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/parkmontius

I wrote that and it was accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donrua1

I still haven't seen an explanation of why this is wrong: you are young, yet. I'm a native English speaker and I would use that sentence. Son: I cant believe I have no beard. Father: you are young yet.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

I agree that the adverbs "still" and "yet" both seem like synonymous and grammatical options--both can act as adverbs meaning "at the present time." However, I've learned that DL doesn't always account for every possible correct variation--only for the most common usage. In this case, "still" strikes me as the more frequently chosen word. Still, there's always the possibility that DL will add variations using "yet" to the list of correct translations if enough people report it. E.g. "Yet/still you are young." "You are yet/still young." "You are young yet/still." (--though in the first version, "yet" might be taken for a conjunction rather than an adverb.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donrua1

Thanks for the thoughtful reply. It seems like there's a downside to DL's approach. If you only reward the most common translation, then at the same time you are telling people that he less common translation is "wrong", and in fact it is not wrong, it is less common. That seems like a practice that can really foul up someone's training, clog their mind with inaccurate information which then must be unlearned at a later date. I would suggest they use a broad acceptance of correct usage, and then use other techniques such as the multiple choice of "which is the most common translation of" to help people refine during advanced courses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KBurn289

I have heard this said before in a narrow context such as this, but I think it's slang/idiomatic/poetic and falling into disuse. The implication in your example is that something we expect to happen hasn't happened (growing a beard/aging), but a few liberties have been taken with grammar. This often happens with idiomatic expressions. Without the context, it seems very bad English. Without knowing your nationalities, I would also wager that it may be a British regionalism. I'm British but I just asked my American friend and she said it sounds totally wrong to her (bearing in mind Duolingo uses American English).

'Still' is much more correct-sounding; you could not apply the rule you are suggesting to any similarly-structured sentence outside of this context.(in the present simple tense)

For example, if you were waiting for 5pm so you could finish work and you ask "Can I go home now?", the reply would never be "No, it's 4pm yet". It would be "No, it is still 4pm".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rbrtcrnwll

Why is Todavia before eres?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/averrryyyyyy

Why does "todavía" come before "eres"? Because then it sounds like "Still you are young." and it doesn't sound very proper. I feel like it should be, "Eres todavía joven."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groomer2

I think joven in this case is a noun and the adjective in spanish comes after the noun

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBranch1998

"You are still young, padawan." should be an acceptable answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AneeshW
AneeshW
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why do we use the verb "ser" here and not "estar"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GFStroope

I agree with david and paul

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Westermann15
Westermann15
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I disagree. They mean two different things

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariegpalmer

I don't see the difference.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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"Still you are young" is clumsy English. (The "still" looks like it modifies the word closest to it, which would mean you are still you and not somebody else.)

"Still, you are young" (with a comma) means "And yet ("in spite of that" or "nevertheless), you are young." (Adverb.) If you don't like commas, you might still :) get away with this meaning using my first example, but in conversation, there's a slight pause between "still" and "you."

"You are still young" means "You are not yet old." The adjectives "still" and "young" must be together to complement each other.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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"You are still young" I guess is wholly literal. "Still, you are young." could be somebody saying "still" like they say "well" or "now".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samhiggs

why is 'yet you are wrong' incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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Because "joven" means "young", not "wrong." Still, assuming you meant to say "Yet, you are young", I take the difference to be as follows...

"You are still young" indicates you have not lived very long (as in "There is plenty of time to find the right girl. You are still young.")

"Yet, you are young" reads more like a statement of surprise that someone has accomplished so much despite their age. ("You already own three businesses and yet, you are so young.")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camomma9552

What's wrong with you are young still.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groomer2

what is the problem with "you are young yet"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NazbinNaha

What is the spanish grammer rules for this two word-"todavia" and "aun" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groomer2

what is wrong with you are young yet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KBurn289

Read above - 'yet' means it hasn't happened, 'still' means it started before and is continuing to happen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XenonWing

Basically what I hear on a daily basis from everyone I know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewDun11

'You are young still' not accepted? Maybe its just my Irish grammer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiovanniSantucci

I'll have to use this as a counterexample to the "ser is always permanent and intrinsic/inherent" myth.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DxRc4m

Can you use Ya instead of todavia?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newfw

I do not think so. Ya means already, Todavia means still.

"Still" is used to say an action or situation continues to the present because it has not finished. It often refers to something happening for longer than expected.

"Already" is used to refer to an action that happened sooner than expected.

This resource will help you distinguish between the meaning of those words: http://www.grammar.cl/Notes/still-yet-already.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DxRc4m

Gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebzou

Could you say : eres todavia joven?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RiccardoRomano73

Why is not correct "however you're young"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

The English translations usually given for todavía include "still," "yet," and "even" (but not "even so"). These words have the sense of continuance or of something remaining the same up to a certain time.

Meanwhile, the word "however" has two primary uses. First, it transitions between two ideas--to show a different or opposing point of view. Used in this way, it means "but," "on the other hand," "even so," "despite this," or "nevertheless." Second, it can mean "in whatever way," as in "you can play the piano however you wish."

"Still" can be used in the first sense of "however," (meaning "even so"), but this meaning doesn't match "todavía" (which means remaining or continuing to be). Thus, even though "however" can be a synonym with "still," the word "however" cannot act as a translation for "todavía."

To explain a nuance of written English that might be related to your confusion-- Still comma, or pause when spoken you're young = This sets "still" off as an introductory or transitioning word: "Even so, you're young" or "However, you're young." The person's youth is in contrast to a previous statement. This meaning doesn't match "todavía."

Still no comma or pause you're young = This unusual word order sounds like an exclamation in English. I can just picture somebody meeting a friend after ten years and saying with mock disgust "After all this time, still you're young!" However, it's more common to hear this phrased "you're still young." Either way, the speaker means "you remain/continue to be young." This is the sense of the word "todavía." Hope that helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RiccardoRomano73

Thanks Athalia, very exhaustive answer!!! You earned one lingot!!! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jose_Romildo

I'd like to add that: "todavía", here in Brazil we use But or however. "Still" does not convence me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jose_Romildo

Now I understand it. Thanks for your explanation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty325699
Dusty325699
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Could this also be translated as "you are young every day"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

What would be the point?

...unless of course, you're talking to Peter Pan.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jena2304

Why wouldn't it be still are you..should maybe be in a form of a question. But they said still you're young..i dont get it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tsionena

It doesn't make sense that it says "you are still young" because it wanted the literal translation and that is "Still are young"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

The verb "eres" is in the familiar "you" form; that's where the English translation gets the subject "you."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebunny84ppg

Forever young, I want to be, forever young...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kristy.santiago

What is the difference between "you are still young" and "you are young still"? I placed still at the end and it was marked wrong...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reg_ray
reg_ray
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"Todavía eres joven." Like when you want to tell someone that he/she is not yet of legal age?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

To say that someone is /too/ young for something, you'd need to use "demasiado": "You're still too young" = "Todavía eres demasiado joven."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TsarNicky.4

this was marked incorrect, what is wrong with it? Todavía eres joven. yet you are young

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LMHERSHBEE
LMHERSHBEE
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you are still young? Boy, I thought that it was you are still very young.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AcidLotus

"Todavia eres joven" 'Even you are young'. How is this incorrect? I would imagine an older man returning to school for a career change, imply begin jealous of a professor who teaches a class of young adults.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

"Todavia" doesn't mean "even" in that sense. It is synonymous with aún and basically means "still" or "yet." It is only used to say "even" in a comparative context where it could be replaced with still. "He is even older than I" = "He is still older than I".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mburke6

is todovia only "spanish" spanish? spanish dict does not have? aun comes up as even.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Not really. It's a close enough synonym that it's quite possible that aun is used more often in some regions than others. In English, multisyllabic words are routinely replaced with shorter equivalents. I don't see why Spanish should be any different.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AcidLotus

Spanish, Spanish... You probably mean Castilian; The language of North and central Spain. Not to mention Murcian and Andalusian of the southern side of Spain. 10 dialects in all and all over the world.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mburke6

yep, that is probably what I mean

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TriciaMuir

I translated the sentence as 'You are young still' and this was marked as incorrect instead of 'You are still young'. Please explain the difference. Is it me?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

No, it's Duo. Note, the Spanish sentence places the adverb at the start of the sentence, not in the middle. This is a common enough construction in Spanish (as is placement at the end). That alone suggests there is nothing to favor "You are still young" over "You are young still" as a proper translation.

It is true that the placement of the adverb in English should suggest what it modifies. Sometimes it even makes a difference. This discussion page should be proof enough that word placement makes a real difference to some people. Honestly, in a four word sentence I'm hard pressed to find any meaningful difference due to word order.

My advice is to use what Duo suggests and move on. You will not improve your understanding of Spanish (or English) by overthinking this one.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamtammm35

Could you say "Eres todavia joven" and it would still mean "You are still young"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Yes. It could also mean "You still are young" and "You are young still." The placement of the adverb in this particular Spanish sentence does not unequivocally dictate its placement in the corresponding English sentence. At best it might suggest where the speaker's focus/emphasis is placed, but none of that has any bearing on the meaning of the sentence.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naka699207

"yet" is one of the definitions in the scroll down menu but "yet you are young" is not accepted, is there anything wrong with using yet in this case or should this be accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InshateVol

why not "eres todavía joven"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellen192555

I said you are young still. It was counted wrong but I think it is correct.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHil447208

Would "Tu eres todavia joven" work? (Also how do I put an accent over the "u" when I have an english keyboard?)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffinwoman

It would be so very helpful if the accents in the corrections - and everywhere, could be sort of highlighted. Any idea how to push this thought up the chain? Surely there is an app to make that happen.

2 months ago