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  5. "Uisce beatha."

"Uisce beatha."

Translation:Whiskey.

January 8, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidgrealy

When I was younger, I thought 'uisce beatha' and 'uisce beannaithe' were the same thing. I was a bit afraid of touching the holy water in church!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackmchugh12

this is quality hahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anfeardathuil

Whiskey is the water of life? First the leprechaun, now this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackVMacK

The same phrase for distilled spirits exists in Latin, as aqua vitae.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

Survive drinking it and you become the Kwisatz Haderach. ;^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

Any distinction between this and "fuisce"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cathal42

Uisce beatha is the traditional term, fuisce is a gaelicisation of whiskey. In practice, I think fuisce is actually more common these days


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkuecker1965

Well this is entertaining. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

I wonder if Duolingo would accept ‘whisky’.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tmcg

I tried it this time around, and it said I had a typo in my answer, but dinged it correct anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

It should do, because 'uisce beatha' could apply to Scotch as well as to Irish whiskey.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leannx

I recently learned that this phrase comes from monks in the middle ages. Apparently alchemists were trying to find an "elixir of life" by distilling spirits. It was known as "aqua vitae" which means "water or life". This was brought from Europe to the monks of Ireland who approximated it as the "uisce beatha" we now know. There's a bit more to it and I'd encourage you to look into it yourself. I found it really interesting and thought I'd share. :)

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