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"¿Quién más está en el barco?"

Translation:Who else is on the boat?

1
5 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

She sounds like she sneezed at the end of 'barco'

39
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luke_shears
luke_shears
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Yeah it would like Ms Spanish coughed.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sds59600

Hahahahaha

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teebz25

Is there a reason we include "mas"?

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stewbot
stewbot
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I think it translates to "Who more is on the boat?"

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

¨who else¨ means you know about one or more people and then ask about additional people. so if you think about it the ¨who else¨of English logically means ¨who more¨. Though it makes perfect sense that is not how you would say it in English but it is how its done in Spanish;

David here is your icecream, who else (who more) wants one?

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I thought the verb was estan...let's just slide allthewordstogether, OK?

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

WhoNeedsSpaces?WeCertainlyDon't. Is it just me or does everybody who speaks Spanish sound like they could be auctioneers?

18
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kilyle
Kilyle
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Most languages sound like this to outsiders -- the insiders, the native speakers, are just used to the words being used and, in the case of unfamiliar words, the way words tend to start or end and the way they tend to fit in sentences.

It's only while teaching the subject that you slow down and add deliberate spaces -- and if you stick to that design too long, it'll handicap the student. That's what the turtle is for, by the way, so you can slow it down if you need to.

One of the few things I really like about French is that they have built-in mechanics to merge words, or rather to show that words are merged. There are rules for the final sound of a word and the circumstances in which you omit it and when you say it. It's an intriguing mechanic that I haven't seen in other languages (mostly because sensible languages tend to write down the actual sounds being used, but that's just one of my gripes with French).

19
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/armstrongclyde

Actually some languages are spoken faster than others. My Spanish teacher explained it as you did, but I was so sure that Spanish was spoken faster, that I did some digging on studies. Here is a website with a well summarized article on the findings.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fast-talkers/

12
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Thanks for a great laugh. Josh.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dluzer
dluzer
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Actually the reason for this in any language you don't know well is because the natural pauses don't always occur at word boundaries. It's a linguistic phenomenon

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Among European languages, Español is the most rapid.

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icf1010

"Bar-kughhh" lol

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeahMiller6

So would "mas" in this case mean else always in context?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaoAmerican

The Spanish word "más" also means "else" in English...and similarly, the Hungarian word "más" also means "else" as in someone/something else and "other" in English.

Here's why...the English word "else" can also mean "in addition" and is synonymous with "other".

"Else" is also related to a Latin word, "alius" (this means "another"), that contains the prefix "al", which means "beyond".

Thus, the Spanish/Hungarian "más" and the English "else" both express the same concept of: more, in addition, beyond, other, another

So in Spanish, "Quién más" means: Who else?...Who, in addition?

13
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ramzi705267

What do you mean by "always in context"? If you say "Él más joven" it means "He is younger" (more young), if you use it in this context, it means "Who else" simply because it makes no sense in English to ask "Who more". Some things cannot be translated word by word as you probably know, so just go with the closest meaningful thing :)

5
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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I'm just replying here so I can go back to it later and give you and LaoAmerican lingots when I'm not on the app.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary586588

It's nice to know some tricks since I am only using the app at this time on my phone but I would like to get it on my computer later.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

actually ¨who more¨ makes sense in English-people could work out what you meant in almost every use, its just that it sounds so horrible to our ears

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob_R

"Who more is on the boat" was not accepted. Why not?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LandonThom
LandonThom
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I hope English is not your native language.

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berserkered

Who else is on board doesn't work, even though that's a more natural translation. Why not?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Well, where's the boat? Because we're on the Enterprise right now. :)

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daphne_Weihs

Good for when you join the coast guard!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darwin993712

A hispano speaker here

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Savannah872794

whats the difference between el barco and la barca?

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaddyByrne5

Much better is to say who is onboard the boat; some people could be inside the cabin

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikash

Why does 'más' mean 'else' instead of 'more'?

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

no it includes both and is clear from the context. more, else and other in English adress the same concepts so all can likely be included at times.

eg ¨other than that = in addition too / ouside of (more, else) anyone else? = more people than already addressed ? / any others? we need more option= we need other options / we can do these things. what else could we do?

same concept, different areas of use.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Landon352311

I put "who else is in the boat", and it was counted wrong. Not sure why I got it wrong?

0
Reply8 months ago