"I hate bad weather!"

Translation:Is fuath liom droch-aimsir!

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FeargalMcGovern

(pardon my poor knowledge of grammatical terms but...) why is that in this case the describing word "droch" comes before "aimsir". If this were "I hate red cars" it would be "is fuath liom carrana dearga".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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You're right, in Irish adjectives (droch, dearg) come after the noun (aimsir, carr) that they modify.

The difference here is that 'droch' isn't actually a separate adjective, it's part of the noun. 'Droch-aimsir' is considered one word, that's why it's hyphenated (...-...).

When two words are squished together like this the adjective comes first, just like in English (eg blackbird) and the following part gets a séimhiú (a 'h' after the first consonant). You don't see that part here because 'aimsir' starts with an vowel and they don't take a séimhiú.

These compound words are not all that common but you'll certainly come across other examples like 'seanbhean' (old woman) and 'ard-fheis' (high convention).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwasson
mwasson
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Gramadach na Gaeilge is useful here, as always. There are certain adjectives that are particularly likely to be used as prefixes:

http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/adjekt5.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Desiree29977

That makes so much more sense! The phrase is only being given to me as drag-and-drop so I didn't even realize it was hyphenated

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
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Red cars AFAIK would be actually carranna dearga, because it is plural. ;-)

(Or cairteacha dearga in Munster, according to Gussmann & Doyle’s An Ghaeilge)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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So would "good weather" be "deá-aimsir"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes ma'am, it would.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eoinmonaghan
eoinmonaghan
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Should aimsir be a pural

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeaininMC

That would be aimsirí. Are you thinking it should be plural?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom_beta
tom_beta
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Why not "aimsir dona"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

dona is more likely to be understood as an expression of sympathy when used attributively - an duine dona - "the poor/unfortunate man. Go dona is used with the weather (tá an aimsir go dona - "the weather is bad"), but "aimsir dona" just isn't the way you say "bad weather".

Droch is used as a prefix in all sorts of words to mean bad, or nasty or evil.

drochthaispeántas - "a poor show" drochdhuine - "a bad/evil person"
drochbhlas - "bad taste" drochghnáthú - "a bad habit"

1 year ago
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