"Come si scrive il tuo nome?"

Translation:How do you write your name?

July 26, 2013

41 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thmarchi

For this level, I've had to do some extra research about indirect, direct, and reflexive pronouns. This particular sentence has a construct with "si" that has foiled me several times, but I found a good explanation of how it works. Here, the "si" is operating as an impersonal reflexive pronoun. Here is a website with a good explanation: http://www.netplaces.com/italian-practice/the-impersonal-si-piacere-commands/the-impersonal-si-construction.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YichenHu

The link is dead...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fighter.Boy

Thank you , Grazie mille


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monamoooo

Thanks for it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SofieJones798

Can't open anymore...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPickering

Why scrive, not scrivi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreAndrez

Using scrivi it would translate as "how do YOU write your name". You need to use the scrive form to translate as "how is your name written". Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/safibta

How do you write your name is accepted because it sounds correct in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

Thanks, AndreAndrez, I wondered about scrivi/scrive. Literally the Italian says: How is written your name? That explains the scrive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harrogate12

I wrote "how do you write your name?" and it was accepted. March 2022.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Revilo_N

The name is the subject, literally: "How does your name write itself?" In German one would say similarly: "Wie schreibt sich dein Name?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esma1983

I think that the most accurate translation here is: How is your name written?

1-How is your name written? come si scrive il tuo nome? The verb used here is the reflexive verb: "scriversi".

It could also be the verb "scrivere" with the "passive si". the litteral translation would be: how do people write your name?

2- How do you write your name? come scrivi il tuo nome? (informal) come scrive il suo nome? (formal) The verb used here is : "scrivere"

Am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SofieJones798

The best explanation I've read so far. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

I always translate this one literally and it usually helps. 'How [does] one write your name?' In Duo's translation: 'How do you write your name?' the first 'you' is referring to people in general. Hope this helped anyone having trouble.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanderRadaxian

I think this should be Duo's standard translation in these cases. Though sounding very formal in English, this is the precise meaning of 'se/si' in these instances, an impersonal pronoun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sbarbour

I msde thispoint, then saw you already had. Helpful explanation. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreAndrez

I don't understand the difference between si and se. Why not "come se scrivi il tuo nome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

"se" means "if."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam415f

"Se" is "if" or "herself". Why exactly "si" and not "se" - I don't know for sure. But I think "se" is feminine, and "si" is masculine, maybe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiffycat

After some investigation, it seems this falls under the category of Passive Impersonal statements, or 'passivante' voice. I would have translated this statement in English to 'how is your name written'? In this formula, you use the passive particicle si (the smae as teh reflexive pronoun si), and conjugate the verb in the third person singular or plural (depending if the subject is singular or plural). There is ALWAYS an object. You can read more about it here: https://www.thoughtco.com/using-the-passive-voice-in-italian-4050932


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RiridJatmiko

I'm lost in this section


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moehooper

Why ‘scrive’ instead of ‘scrivi’ ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chel451498

I've got two thoughts, either you didn't see the previous answers explaining why, or you didn't understand them. Going with not understanding, I'll try to explain.

The Italian Come si scrive... is better read/translated as 'How does one write...'; but since that comes across as very formal in English, my guess is DL shows it in English as 'how do you write'. Without the si before scrive, we would have 'how does s/he write'. The si changes that to 'oneself/one's self/one', which leads us to the third-person 'you' (vs the second-person 'you').

In case I've just muddied the waters, look at these explanations:
https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/633689?comment_id=3125268

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/633689?comment_id=633690

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/633689?comment_id=28773741


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benczurp

I think in another example "si+ third person singular" was translated as "we do something". So shouldn't " how do we write your name" be a valid translation here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam415f

No. "Si + 3rd personal verb" means a reflexive verb. So "si scrive" means smth like "writes itself". But in English (in this case) we use Passive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SofieJones798

So it's like passive voice in English, si scrive = be written. That makes sense by using scrive rather than scrivi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GU7P

I didn't try it, but would "How do you spell your name?" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noryn5

Yes, i believe so


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birdfishy

Don't be shy! This is what most native speakers would say!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineEWin

that's what I wrote and it's accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christiaan463399

Wonder why: "how do we write your name" is not excepted. "We" as in the general "we".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SMAKCANADA

Because it's the singular


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monique678830

How to spell your name...Is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shane553924

it's not correct English even though you do get your point across


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWheatl6

So come suddenly means how again! It meant what a bit ago?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilanabouskila

It would be helpful if Duo would explain how this works instead of suddenly presenting us with Come si scrive.... The comment from JennaHO was totally enlightening - thank you!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavideVari15

"How does one write your name?" is perfectly good English AND marked correct Dec 21. One might suspect that DL understands this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian352881

How does one write your name ... not accepted by Duo

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