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"Yo le dije a él que no se fuera tan tarde del trabajo."

Translation:I told him not to leave work so late.

0
5 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/theratt

Can someone explain why fuera now translates to "leave"

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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It's actually "se fuera," the past subjunctive conjugation of "irse."

28
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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The problem is that some of the other sentences translate "se fuera" as "to go." So, that might be confusing to someone who doesn't know the difference between ir and irse that it isn't being translated consistently. Go away is also another translation of irse.

3
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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Wiktionary: to go (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/irse this appears to be a strange case of the reflexive reversing the meaning of a word.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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It could be the same reason "fue" can sometimes mean "leave" or "went". If there is an indication you are leaving a point such as "del" (from the) work in this example it is "leave/left". If it was "al"( to the) work it would be motion to work and thus "went/go".

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Well... "ir" usually only means "to go" (http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=Ir). It gets translated as "to leave" when it's in the reflexive "irse" like in the original sentence (se fuera). When talking about leaving a place, the preposition is needed, even though in English, it can be omitted. The "de" alone doesn't necessary tell you that the verb means "to leave", rather it is the verb that requires you to add in the preposition, which further emphasizes that you are leaving that place, in this case at least.

4
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toggrikk
toggrikk
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I am often translating "tan" to "that", such as in this sentence. Should it be accepted?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I don't know. "That" isn't listed as one of the meanings of "tan" here: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=tan

However, "that" is listed in two of the definitions for "that" here: http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=that

  • that adv (so) tan adv

It's not that easy to learn a new language after age fifty. = No es tan fácil aprender un idioma después de los cincuenta años.

  • that adv (very) tan adv

The movie was not that good. = La película no era tan buena.

So, in this sentence, it probably should be accepted. However, as someone else mentioned, it might be confusing for anyone who then thought they could use tan instead of esto in other contexts.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollermama

When the sentence make sense in english using that or so I believe you can use it that way. Examples:you are not that (so) late today. But you could not say - You are not so(that) girl.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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this and that late should be accepted too.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Oliwia75: There is not word to indicate "this" or "that" in the sentence.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmiyamoto
cmiyamoto
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How about 'tan'?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jensennicole

"tan" means "so", not "this" or "that".

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmiyamoto
cmiyamoto
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You're wrong, 'this' and 'that' have more meanings than just 'esto' and 'eso'. You can sometimes use them interchangeably with 'so'.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jensennicole

My statement was in error. "Tan" is an adjective, not a determiner. In English "this"/"that" can function as both adjective and determiner. Duolingo wants the least ambiguous option. Translating "tan" as "this"/"that" in this sentence makes future translations of "this"/"that" somewhat ambiguous. Most people wouldn't pick up on the fact that, in this sentence, the word in question is functioning as an adjective, not a determiner. Later, they might try to use "tan" as a determiner, which it's not. So I agree that "tan" might mean "this"/"that" as an adjective, but "esto"/"eso" are the Spanish determiners, and Duolingo is trying to avoid confusion by assigning only "so" as a meaning for "tan".

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catie0501

In this case I was thinking this was the "ser" not the "ir" form of fuera and so the sentence was about being at work/getting there on time - something along the lines of "not being so late on the job" (i.e. on time)

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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No, I see your reasoning, but the problem is that there is a "se" in front of the verb "fuera" making it reflexive, because of that your verb choices are "ir(se)" and "ser(se)". However, "serse" doesn't exist, "ser" is not a reflexive verb, and so it must be "irse" which means "to leave".

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

When did we learn that ser can never be reflexive? Could someone please point me to that lesson?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glukkon
glukkon
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What in the world is the correct translation of this one? I certainly cannot come up with one.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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A correct translation is "I told him not to leave work so late", I understand the word order of the two languages kinda throws you off, I had to think about it a bit before getting the answer.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I put "I told him not to leave so late from work" and it was accepted by DL.
It is a more literal translation of the Spanish, even though the English is a little awkward. However, DL's suggested answer "I told him not to leave work so late" is actually ambiguous. It could refer to his frequent late departure from his workplace at the end of the day, or it could indicate that, too often, he has been putting off starting work that he needs to do.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inga-Lill

why not " leave the job so late"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

What excellent English, DL: "I told him that he was not to go so late from work." This is no doubt how one computer speaks to another.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrule
mrule
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.. yeah I'm still not sure if that is even English.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk1ph1x
sk1ph1x
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That one kind of threw me. I answered: "I told him not to go so late from work".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura692514

you totally screwed up the hints on the word "del". You put "to be in love with/to fall in love with your/from the" How do these words equate to "I told him not to leave work so late."?

1
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roihu7
Roihu7
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Can someone explain this sentence structure? It doesn't make any sense to me at all.

1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toshisama

"that late" isn't good ? (it's already difficult to get the right tense, if I also have to pay attention to this details :))

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola toshisama: There is no word to indicate "that" in the sentence.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cquark
cquark
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Unless we're thinking of the word "tan." The word "that" can also be used in English as an intensifier, replacing "so."

"You didn't have to be that hard on him."

"I can't believe you were that late."

"The test wasn't that difficult."

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thebreef
thebreef
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"se fuera del trabajo" could also be translated with "he left FROM work"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Yes, you could write "from work" if you choose, but the "from" is usually omitted in English when we use "to leave". As long as you said "not to leave from work so late", it's fine.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harvey.hod

Another gibberish English translation

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

Can we use "should not go" in place of "wasn't to go", as in: "i told him that he should not go so late from work"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Well... "Le dije a él que no se fuera tan tarde"=I told him not to leave so late. Your suggestion "that he should not go" would translate to "le dije a él que no debiera ir(se) tan tarde". It adds in a different verb, so it probably wouldn't be accepted.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catie0501

make sense - but the subjunctive suggests doubt/suggestion, no? So there is almost an implied "should"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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The subjunctive can also be used with a demand/command, in this case, the person basically demanded that the man not leave so late, and so this would not be a suggestion.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeyManasso

I said "his job" and not "work" for trabajo and it said it was wrong.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lizzie139260

The translation that Duo is giving me for this is: I told him that he was not to go from work so late. --- Really that is what Duo just gave me. So does that mean someone at Duo is trying to change this sentence somehow? This is really a silly sentence and should just be removed. Please put something else in that someone would actually say.

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Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura692514

They gave me 3 different ways to say it in English and 2 in Spanish. I don't think the DuoLingo writers know how to teach, and I am beginning to suspect they don't know either language very well, either. There hints for the word "beneficios" were benefits (correct), coffee processing plant(?), and dressings(?). Very stupid.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheMightyFro
TheMightyFro
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I have used "go from work" and "leave from work" and each time it counted it incorrect, and asked for the alternative!! Which is it?

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Finally a useful phrase! If only my husband understood Spanish. ;)

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodhisattvah

Can anybody tell me if this could actually be "I told him not to go to work so late."

0
Reply2 months ago