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"El argumento que él hizo fue muy bueno."

Translation:The argument he made was very good.

5 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/namayani

Could you say "El argumento que él hizo era muy bueno"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, you could. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/namayani

thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

I don't think so. He "made" the argument -- one time; therefore, needs to be in preterite tense "Era" would not make sense here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregoryPotts
GregoryPotts
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Why wouldn't it accept "plot" as a translation for "argumento?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zeunysos

Any native speakers available to clarify the difference between "argumento" and "discusión"?

It seems like "argumento" is reserved for a series of propositions leading to a definite conclusion (as in "they made an argument"), while "discusión" would be used for a vocal disagreement or contentious debate (as in "they had an argument" -- English wouldn't use "discussion" there).

Am I close?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiskPidge
DiskPidge
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I'm not a native speaker, but I live in a largely Spanish speaking country, and there's often confusion even for advanced learners surrounding these words. But yes, you're right about your understanding here.

"la discusión" is what English people would call an argument, a heated shouting match between people angrily disagreeing. "Discussion" in English, as a civilised conversation of sharing opinions or debate, translates as 'el debate'. "El argumento" translates into English as 'the argument' when synonymous with 'the point' or 'the reasoning'.

On a related note, after someone constructs a 'reasoned argument' that you agree with, you can say to them "Tienes razón" - literally, 'you have reason', or as we would say, 'you have a point'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wyqtor
wyqtor
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Would argumento lo que él hizo be correct? Could someone please explain to me in which case you use each of them?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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The relative pronoun que by itself is sufficient to refer to argumento. In lo que expressions, the relative pronoun que refers to the lo, which is essentially a demonstrative pronoun of abstract or indefinite nature. Example: Como lo que quiera (I eat what I want OR I eat that which I want.) I find that breaking lo que down into that which instead of the shorter what (which is really a complex logical contraction, which must be very difficult for ESL learners) enables me to see clearly what lo que means or if it's appropriate.

Your phrase would be "argument that which he made," which should sound very odd to your English ear.

If that is used in English as the relative pronoun (or who, or which), you can pretty much count on que to be a good translation.

3 years ago