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  5. "I like it very much."

"I like it very much."

Translation:Taitníonn sé go mór liom.

January 11, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niamhwitch

I didn't use "taitníonn" with this because it said "like" not "enjoy" (which is what I've associated with taitníonn).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes, but if you want to use "like" in the future or past, generally you're gonna use tatin, because ba mhaith liom defaults to "I would like"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exeisen

But this sentence is in the present tense. So you can't use "is maith liom" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes, you should be able to use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnfm8

If you used this form, would the sentence be "Is maith liom é go mór"? Or am I making a mistake somewhere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I think 'Is maith liom go mór é' would be much more natural. In native speech, object pronouns generally come at the end of a clause.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruairi21

Would, "Is maith liomsa." get across the "very" or just emphasize that I like it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It would just emphasize the 'i'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SFMurph

I put "Is maith liom go mór é" and that was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bredacm

I said "is maith liom go mor e" . Why is that not correct? But it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea617881

Why not "Is maith liom go mor é"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.Carney

could this sentence also mean I like him very much? Or, what would that sentence look like? (having trouble with the se) Tx


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Irish simply doesn't differentiate between "he" and "it" - the sentence will be the same whether you like him or you like it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bredacm

Why is it 'se" and not "e' in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruairi21

"Sé" is used for the subject (nice it starts with "s," eh?). "é" is used for the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

"Go mór" cannot go to the end in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruairi21

JuergenZirak, The "le" form is needed to trigger the "please" meaning. See: https://www.teanglann.ie/ga/fgb/taitin definition 2. In this example if the "liom" is left off, then the sentence translates as, "It shines greatly."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Thank you for your answer! My idea was not to skip the "le"/"liom", however, but I was rather wondering if it was possible to swap the order of "liom" and "go mór". Maybe just changing the emphasis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruairi21

Sorry I misinterpreted. I hope a grammarian of Irish will answer your question. I sometimes use Google to see how prevalent a phrase might be on the internet. This phrase: "go mór liom." got 38,800 hits on Google.ie and the contrasting phrase "liom go mór." got 36,000 results. Now ungrammatical things are posted on the internet all the time. However, this data makes me think you might be onto something?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen911046

So taitnim could not be used here?

I thought it would have been mentioned above but no one covered it.

Taitnim se go mor liom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

taitním is the 1st person singular, taitníonn sé is the 3rd person singular. taitním sé is just a meaningless jumble.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruairi21

Were you miss hearing the taitníonn for taitním? They can sound very similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

Why not "Is maith liom an-mór"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

If that meant anything, it would be "I like very big".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

I was trying to use the hints provided, in combination with what I’ve already learned. The proffered solution came as a rude shock.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruairi21

I was complaining once to a learning speaker who has reached a high degree of fluency about how Duoling doesn't always proceed in stepwise fashion and this can cause these shocks, like the one you experienced. She said the shocks can be useful as they cause you to remember the new item.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

I don't know about remembering the item. If anything, the shock forced me to accommodate a whole new paradigm for remembering vocabulary. I had begun to believe that a certain pattern exists for sentence formation in Irish, only to be shown that it doesn't always work that way. Now I have to learn a whole new pattern. Challenging but scary.

I remember when my youngest brother was a toddler. He used to say he would do such and such "until we get home". He meant that he would do it when he got home. He didn't understand the correct use of the word "until". That took a whole other set of responses to learn. This experience is like that one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Do you understand why someone would interpret your "Is maith liom an-mór" as "I like very big"?

If so, do you understand why it wouldn't be understood as "I like it very much"? Apart from the missing pronou ("it"), an-mhór (an- lenites) means "very big" not "very much".

Duolingo has a number of exercises using taitnionn X le Y to mean "Y likes X" or "Y enjoys X" or "X pleases Y", introduced as early as Verbs: Present 1 - it shouldn't be much of a shock by the time you get to the Adverbs skill.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marian802744

Is maith liom go mór é?????

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