"Nílim ábalta scríobh."

Translation:I am not able to write.

3 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/A.bee
A.bee
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Anyone else try "I amn't able to write"? This felt natural for me, but now I think "amn't" might be colloquial language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MalcolmSepulchre

I've never heard anyone say "amn't". What region would it be from?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It's quite common in Ireland - I use both "I amn't" and "I'm not" (I think - I've never paid attention before, until Duolingo marked me wrong when I wrote "I amn't")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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I have a Scottish-Canadian friend (born here in Canada, but her parents were Scottish), who says "amn't." I think it's quite charming and, if it's the way people speak in Ireland and Scotland, I think Duo should accept it. Just my opinion, of course. I've seen people argue for much weirder things than that. I hope you reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poblach
poblach
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I wouldn't even try to do the Glaswegian version of I am not,which is A'm urnae. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CormacMOB

It is ubiquitous in Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TuathaDeDanann

I believe it is a Scottish/Irish thing, but living in the Southern US, I've never encountered it myself. Not sure how common it is over there, either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wanjir1
Wanjir1
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Extremely common in Ireland

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scorcher92

It may be used a lot colloquially but it's not actually considered a word in "proper" English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Speak for yourself - it's as proper as any other "not" contraction, like "aren't" or "isn't".

I amn't, you aren't, he isn't.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David417147

In the middle/south US you will hear "ain't" instead of "amn't." Contractions of the same words (am not) just different preference based on geography, I think. (I've personally never seen amn't before)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"amn't" is quite the same as "ain't" - "amn't" is a normal contraction like "aren't", whereas "ain't" (at least in Ireland) was always considered slang. My teachers wouldn't correct "amn't" if I wrote it in an essay, but they would correct "ain't" - I don't know if "ain't" would be corrected by a teacher in the middle/south US.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MahoganyGaspipe

Interesting that your teachers were OK with amn't; mine treated it with even greater disdain than they did ain't! Both are contractions of am not, and ain't derives from amn't: the m in amn't was frequently elided to give an't, then the vowel lengthened, yielding ain't.

I don't know if amn't in Ireland and Scotland represents the survival of the older contraction, or if it developed independently. I don't think an't survives in any modern English dialect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"amn't", like "aren't" and "isn't" is just a contraction of the negative form. I have no idea why people who use "aren't" or "isn't" balk at "amn't".

You claim that "aint" derives from "am not", but the wikipedia link you provided actually documents the contraction of "are not" before "am not" and it is, if anything, phonologically closer to "aren't".

I've also decided to drop the apostrophe - it has all the appearance of a hypercorrection, as it's not marking a dropped letter/contraction :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

amn't is exactly analogous to aren't or isn't - you can't say the same of "ain't".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MahoganyGaspipe

I don't see the relevance. Amn't and ain't are both valid contractions of am not, albeit that ain't is newer and its derivation less obvious.

Incidentally, ain't is also a contraction of are not and is not, likely derived in substantially the same way as from am not. Someone who uses ain't is likely to use it in all three senses, and such use would be valid.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annaannaannaan

I put "I am not able to write" (correct), but would the simpler "I cannot write" also been correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Cannot” can be equivalent to “not able” in English, but I’m not sure if that same equivalence holds in Irish — the dictionary entry for ábalta doesn’t offer “can” as a possible translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverCasserley

I can't write---accepted on 12/3/16.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saerbhreathach

sure, except DL will tell you to write "can not" instead of the correct "cannot".... lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMik2

How would one say "you can't have it"? Would it be something like: "níl tú ábalta sé agat"? Or "nil tú ábalta bí sé agat"? Or something else?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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See the third example here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FeargalMcGovern

should "i am not capable of writing" be correct? I was marked incorrect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That would be Nílim ábalta ar scríobh.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexDSSF
AlexDSSF
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What is the Irish way of saying "I can/am able to write"? "Tá mé ábalta scríobh"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

Just simply: 'Tá scríobh agam' would do.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMik2

But wouldn't that mean more "i know how to write" vs "i am able to write"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

I think AlexDSSF meant' I am able to write' as 'I have the ability/know how to write'. But you're right, there could be a situation were 'tá scríobh agam ach níl mé abalta scríobh ag an bhomaite'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZanninaMargariti

Abalta is it an adj??? The regular is abalt???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Ábalta is an adjective.

What do you mean by "The regular"? There is no such word as ábalt.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woa7dSD5
woa7dSD5
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So, for the last question I put 'nílim', which was not accepted, DL telling me that 'níl mé' is correct. Now I've put 'níl mé' and am told 'nílim' is the correct answer. Is there a rule for which one to use?

1 month ago
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