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"Tu n'es pas fatigué ?"

Translation:You are not tired?

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gaysue
gaysue
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Why not feminine form for tired?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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All feminine and plural forms are accepted here: fatigué, fatiguée for singular "tu / vous" and fatigués, fatiguées for plural "vous".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinMans2

Do the French generally ask questions using word inflection rather than sentence structure?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
jytou
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The sentence structure does exist, but it is used only in literature and very formal speech. Otherwise, inflection is the everyday life usage.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
Mod
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Definitely!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricmb
ricmb
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Why isn't "exhausted" accepted? Is it a bad translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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exhausted = épuisé(e)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Droigheann

In my first language a positive and a negative question of this sort are basically interchangeable, but I was taught that in English "You are not tired?" implies, unlike "Are you tired?", certain amount of surprise, disbelief etc. Does a negative question in French have this semantic nuance as well?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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The tone of voice would also determine whether the person asking already knows the answer, wants to check, cannot believe it, disapproves of it... in affirmative as well as in negative.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Droigheann

So it would in my L1, but what they told me was that if there was no such connotation, I shouldn't (in English) use a negative question at all, because I could sometimes even sound unintentionally rude (probably not with "Aren't you tired?", but for example with "Don't you understand?" or "Can't you help me?"), so I wonder whether in French I should be wary about them as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Droigheann

A more specific example: let us say I need to move something heavy for several meters. In Czech it's perfectly natural and (at least with vouvoiement) polite to address a complete stranger with the question "Hello, can't you help me move this thing a bit?", but my understanding is that in English this would be odd or perhaps even boorish, and my question is how would « Vous ne pouvez pas m'aider ? » sound in such situation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Same in French in this case. We would politely ask for help in a positive way: "Bonjour, pouvez-vous m'aider à déplacer un peu cette chose, s'il vous plaît ?".

Also, in imperative, it will always be better (and I assume in all languages) to ask "please remember/ s'il te plaît rappelle-toi" than "please do not forget / s'il te plaît, n'oublie pas". Just a psychological trick to ensure your counterpart focuses on positive things, for it is always easier to say yes than to say no.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Droigheann

Merci beaucoup, très utile pour moi à savoir!

The trick is probably a good one in French and English, but frankly, in Czech "please remember" could be... too insistent. I might use it when talking to a friend, but would probably think twice before telling my boss, teacher, grandparent etc. to "remember" something. "Prosím tě, pamatuj si/vzpomeň si (= s'il te plaît rappelle-toi)" is all right, but generally "prosím vás, nezapomeňte (=s'il vous plaît, n'oubliez pas)", so to say.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RayLevitan

Why isn't the correct English form offered in the word choice for translation?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
Mod
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Can you be more explicit: the correct English form... of what?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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A more natural English expression would be "Aren't you tired?" although Duo tends to avoid contractions.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Kierz_
_Kierz_
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fatigué vs fatigue

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
jytou
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Is that a question?

« fatigue » = "tiredness" (noun) or "to tire"/"get tired" (verb)

« fatigué » = "tired" (adjective) or "tired" (past participle)

La fatigue est insupportable = tiredness is unbearable

Je fatigue vite = I get tired fast (I tire fast)

Je suis fatigué = I am tired (right now)

J'ai fatigué très vite = I have tired very fast (you have run in a race, but you got tired very fast, note that it is not so much in use, probably due to the confusion with the adjective)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Kierz_
_Kierz_
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ok thanks

1 year ago