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"The boy writes phrases."

Translation:El niño escribe frases.

5 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Frases/fresas - almost tripped me up! Fortunately I thought even DL wouldn't have boys writing strawberries.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrashMaster5000
TrashMaster5000
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I thought "sentence" is also translated as "frase". Is that wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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No, you're right. "frase" can mean "phrase" or "sentence".

"sentence" can also be translated as "oración"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_LittleBatman_

NO ceaer.

La principal y más importante diferencia entre una frase y una oración es que la primera no tiene la presencia de un verbo, mientras que la oración está compuesta necesariamente por al menos un verbo.

Una frase es simplemente un conjunto de palabras, las que a veces pueden no tener sentido. Mientras que la oración expresa una idea completa, teniendo un sentido siempre.

Example - Frase: El perro lindo.

Example - Oración: El caballo salta sobre la valla.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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I said they could be translated with the same word, not that they are the same. Ex: "garden" and "yard" are both translated as "jardín" in Spanish, but "garden" and "yard" have different meanings in English.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=frase

Edit: Yes, "frase" can mean "phrase" or "sentence". The words "phrase" and "sentence" have different meanings, but the word "frase", depending on the context, covers both meanings.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_LittleBatman_

Perfecto, entiendo el punto de vista lingüístico; sin embargo, debo señalar que mi inquietud precisó en tu comentario: "frase" can mean "phrase" or "sentence".

No has dicho traducción en la misma oración. Mi intención es ayudar solamente. Saludos.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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That's useful to know LittleBatman.
In English a sentence can be a phrase, but a phrase is not necessarily a sentence. A sentence always has a verb (although in informal speech the verb can be implied).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EkulTheKing

Which also causes confusion because "oración" can also mean "prayer"... thats just spanish for ya.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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That is correct. I don't think there is a common different word for either, but I have seen oración meaning sentence. Perhaps that is the more linguistic word that would be used to define the grammar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kchang172

Why can't I use chiquillo instead of niño or chico?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eloplop2
eloplop2
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There are lots of choices to translate "boy" into Spanish: chico, muchacho, chaval, chiquillo... But they are all very informal (except for chico). We can hear them a lot in spoken Spanish, an also another variations of chiquillo which are even more informal: quillo, illo... I remember another one: zagal, which comes from arabic roots. This one is very unusual and I think I've only listen to that word because of my grandfather xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_LittleBatman_

Yes, you're right. Spanish is a very broad and rich language. It's very important to focus on all its dimensions. Saludos!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkyBlueGum

It should. We don't use it in my country but I know they use it in some other countries. They might think it's related to one meaning of "chiquito" which is another way to call a boy (a cute way to say 'chico', sometimes it means tiny boy, but it usually has an emotional meaning). You should report it and add that word ("chiquillo"). "Muchacho" and "nene" are also other choices.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julia432930

is anyone else as frustrated by the voice recognition as I am!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I didn't even have the voice recognition exercises turned on for over a year. They can be good or bad sort of randomly, depending on many factores. They are always slow though. If they are too frustrating, you can turn them off permanently in settingz. Actually Duo has such an active user community I have always wished there was a forum for live conversation of some sort, either through one on one or groups. I have talked to so many people from many countries, they should have the speakers for language exchange.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julia432930

is anyone else as frustrated by the voice recognition as I am!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zignorp

I put El niño escribe las frases and got it wrong. Curious about why there is no article.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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This is one of the most difficult issues to explain well, but the good news is that once you get it, it sticks. Spanish uses the definite article before things like titles, the hour, days of the week, etc. Although these are different in English, they are really easy to learn for the most part. But most learners know that there is another case out there which is different but they often don't understand what it is. English uses the definite article to specify a specific one or subset of the whole. In these cases if no article is used you often can add the word some without changing the meaning really at all. [If you speak any French you will know that French actually requires what is called the partitive article in these cases] But Spanish extends that use to the situation where you are talking about the whole set or all. This is what we call generalizing. We are talking in general terms about the whole noun, although to some extent we may understand that our generalization is not true for the whole. Coffee is Hot . El café está caliente (except iced coffee.) These generations often occur when the noun is the Subject, but that is not required. But here we are not making a statement about all phrases or phrases in general. Here is the case where adding some makes little difference. So here the rule is like the English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Just an observation: I'm about 90% to the end of this particular exercise and all I've ever had to write so far were: "El niño escribe frases." and "The boy writes phrases.", and "Ella alcanzó su objetivo." and "She reached her objective." interchangeably. :-p

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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July 21, 2015 - Occasionally I get an exercise like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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I know; cases like this sometimes appear. Wasn't really complaining. Was even kinda glad for the break :-D!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Afrocuban1

I literally put "el niño escribe frases" and it said you put "frase" instead of "frases". Wow duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MistaWolwyd
MistaWolwyd
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I put "Lo niño escribe frases", why is it wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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"lo" is an object - it means "him" or "it". You need the definite article "el" (the) here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esteban217086

Las frases or simply "frases?"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Simply frases. We are neither talking about a particular set of frases, which would require the article in both languages, nor are we generalizing about phrases as a whole. If you speak any French, you know about the partiti e article du and it's relatives. It is always required and, if translated, translates as some. I bring this up because I noticed from French that we can always add the word some to these sentences without changing the meaning. Spanish works differently, but I find it easy to check whether I need an article in Spanish. On Spanish if you can add the word some without any real meaning change, you do NOT use the definite article.

7 months ago