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  5. "Er hat ein Getränk."

"Er hat ein Getränk."

Translation:He has a drink.

July 28, 2013

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicoi9412

I always confuse "ihr" with "er" can you explain me the pronuntiation diference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenShmuelo

why "he's having a drink" not correct?

er hat - he has / he's having, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The continuous aspect implies that he's drinking it. The German sentence only implies possession.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauroQuil

Does that mean that the sentence above would not be used to say someone is having a drink? How would we say that in German? This makes the sentence seem like something that could only come from a police officer looking inside a vehicle for something to incriminate a sober driver.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

I'm guessing Er trinkt ein Getränke. Someone having a drink must be an English idiomatic expression that seems funny to Germans?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aurimas91

Yes, German language is peculiar at that point if you compare some of the sentences to English language. I too can't understand why He's having a drink is wrong. Er hat ein Getränke I understand as in he drinks, but not that he has possession of the said drink. It's actually, funny to me...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoemyZambratta

I don't really find it funny or complicated. You'll see, this sentence is likely to be used when, for instance, you open the fridge in the office and notice a drink that has been bought by a workmate. Then you warn the other mates: "Er hat ein Getränke (im Kühlschrank)", which doesn't imply at all he is drinking it. It just implies he owns the drink and can keep it in there as long as he wishes. The usage of this sentence may be infrequent and rare, but keep in mind Duolingo sometimes displays sentences which are grammatically correct, yet semantically unnatural. This may be the case in "Er hat ein Getränke" (either he has the drink in the fridge or somewhere else).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henriette148674

good point, sounds funny to me too !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoemyZambratta

"Er hat ein Getränke" is absolutelly not the same as "He is having a drink". That one would be "Er trinkt ein Getränke". You'll see, this sentence is likely to be used when, for instance, you open the fridge in the office and notice a drink that has been bought by a workmate. Then you warn the other mates: "Er hat ein Getränke (im Kühlschrank)", which doesn't imply at all he is drinking it. It just implies he owns the drink and can keep it in there as long as he wishes. The usage of this sentence may be infrequent and rare, but keep in mind Duolingo sometimes displays sentences which are grammatically correct, yet semantically unnatural. This may be the case in "Er hat ein Getränke" (either he has the drink in the fridge or somewhere else).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igeeko

In the tips and notes it is said, "in German haben [and its other forms] signify possession only", it is different in English

wir haben das Wasser -> we have the water and not we are having the water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarciaD

How can I hear the difference between 'ihr' and 'er' ? Does one sound longer than the other?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KalebJairG

You can tell the difference with the verb next to it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annierose5000

I don't know -- I listened several times, even slowly, and the voice was fairly clear, not "er hat". but "iiiiihr habbbbttt" (that was what it sounds like on slow) with the "b" sound emphasized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingmasterN64

Heh. I can't even tell the difference -- it might be my speakers, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JabezSS

Try this: “Er“ sounds like 'ear' and "Ihr" like 'eer'. Hope it helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abbycolinad

Getränkt sounds like "get...drunk"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snehasrikanth

how is the pronunciation of ä different from that of a?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MananGhelani

What is the right sentence to say "He'll have a beverage" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahlie5

Er wird ein Getränk haben. = He will have a beverage.

Or you could just use present tense if it's clear you're talking about the future.

Er hat morgen Geburtstag. = Tomorrow is his birthday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dany13hd

which is the difference Getrank and trinken?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FedericoMa35

As far as I understand. Trinken is the verb, Getränk is the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mck982

Now that this is mentioned....would it be ok to say ,'ich esse Esse....' As part of a sentence, meaning I eat food someplace? I don't know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FedericoMa35

I think, not sure though, that it should be "Ich esse Essen". Wait for others to reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mck982

Can someone help me understand how to use der, die, den and das with the nouns?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FedericoMa35

You have to check what declination case you have to use and the gender of the noun. Nominativ: der (masculine), die (feminine/plural), das (neutral). Akkusativ: den (masculine), the others stay the same. There is another case called Dativ: dem (masculine/neutral), der (feminine), den (plural). Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Organic_9

The lessons prior to this practice did NOT have the word Getränk for me. Am I the only one? I saw the word a couple of times as wrong answers, but it was never used in a sentence or given as a new word with a highlight. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fuzzymittens

Why not einen Getränk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sayali803662

How to pronounced "Getrànk"?

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