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  5. "Ella suma ese factor."

"Ella suma ese factor."

Translation:She adds that factor.

July 28, 2013

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Armandino1987

You don't sum factors, you multiply factors and add terms!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

Unless you aren't talking specifically about a math problem. :=)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ppebler

I think it means she is adding up the factors of a situation. While not mathematically correct we do say this in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrystalDuda

She divides 10 into its prime factors. (5, and 2) She will then add them. (7) What happens next to the factor 5 of 10? She sums that factor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruth985027

To sum doesn't exist in English, sum is not a verb!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse907403

The factors of 24 are 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12. The sum of those factors is 35.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveHarris809825

The only sensible interpretation of this that I can imagine is "She adds in that factor".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

Women (Remember - this is about "she") multiply factors, add factors, set terms and thus confuse the heck out of men. Stick to math it's a lot easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tango-alpha

As a native speaker, this sounds unnatural to me. I would use "ella añade ese factor."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abykale

What is this supposed to mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

I suppose she is the one player that brings 'it' to her volleyball team ;) Who knows? These little words snippets with no context aren't worth fretting about, IMO, but they do add an element of frustration to the Duo experience.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wparker42

I think maybe "She accounts for that factor" is the idea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jkl

it can refer to math where one adds a factor to a sum, such as the foil process.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nohaypan

Actually, in mathematics, terms can be added, while factors are multiplied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterWells3

A perfect number is one where its factors add up to the number itself eg 6=3+2+1 28 = 14+7+4 +2 +1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill314159

"Proper" factors. You don't include the number itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rickjmill

"She considers that factor" is another alternative as far as "abstract objects".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Know.Well.Gee

I think "Ella suma" could be translated also as "She sums up"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

I'm not sure. To me "sum up" is only to make a brief closing remark in the form of a summary. But I was going to report that it should accept "She sums that factor".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregIhnen

I think this is a phrase DL would be better to change or lose. It sounds stilted in English and less you're speaking in strictly the mathematical sense, and in that case the terms are wrong. Where I'm from we would say something like "she is factoring that in", or "she is taking that into consideration". To my ears "she adds that factor" sounds stilted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saritalin

my inclination is to translate 'suma' as 'sums' - I sum the numbers, excel sums the column, etc. Maybe just because it's shorter than 'adds up'. Does that sound alright to everyone else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse907403

That's what I put. "She sums that factor" is absolutely correct English, and a more direct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruth985027

No it isn't correct! Sum, isn't a verb! You can't use it that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Here is Oxford's entry for "sum". Scroll down until you find the category "verb". The entry for "to sum" is listed there. "To sum up" is also very popular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnmurraybray

She adds that "je ne sais quoi "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jindr004

This has many possible meanings. For example, it could be that she is a woman bringing a skill set. Or, she is adding the factors of a number in math class. Or she could be an element of unpredictability in a volatile situation.

If you google "suma ese factor." you find many many examples of usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/strwberryskttles

I'm not a native speaker but I went looking for the differences between sumar and añadir and found these links helpful:

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1208469

It seems sumar is related to numerical counting and añadir is to incorporate X into Y (like when to add an ingredient to a recipe)

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/sumar http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/a%C3%B1adir


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Platachica

I dont understand the english or the spanish, bad sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabineMcKenna

I heard: él asuma ese factor - he assumes that fact Shouldn't that be accepted as correct, too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelaMa552821

I love math, so I put "sums" instead of "adds". Isn't that the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

I don't think you can "sum" a single item.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria696768

Por que nao escreveram add suma =sum add=añadir . Se estou errada por favir corrijam me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReggevLivn

"sumar" means "to sum", not "to add". My answer should have been accepted. "to add" is "añadar"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruth985027

This makes no sense in English. How can we possibly translate a sentence which wouldn't exist?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"She adds that factor" is the preferred translation. What seems to be wrong with it?

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