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"Él me presentó a su esposa."

Translation:He introduced me to his wife.

1
5 years ago

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dr-Pen
Dr-Pen
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How about "He presented his wife to me"?

66
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aokoye
aokoye
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The reason "He presented his wife to me" isn't correct is because "me" (in the Él me" bit) is the indirect object and is referring to the speaker. "Esposa" is the direct object and "a su esposa" would be to his wife".

19
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinnmel
tinnmel
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He presented what (me, which makes me the direct object) to whom ( to his wife, which make his wife the indirect object).

19
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stumbler
Stumbler
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That's exactly what "he presented his wife to me" says: me is indirect object and his wife is direct object. So it should be correct; you have the English backwards in your explanation.

11
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinnmel
tinnmel
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Both ways should be accepted as correct translations of the Spanish. But we have confused ourselves. Stumbler is right in his sentence "He presented his wife to me." Wife is the direct object and me is the indirect. However, if you translate the other way, things would be switched. The other way "He presented me to his wife." Me would be the direct object and his wife would be the indirect.

3
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGS282828

The indirect object pronoun must be used even if the indirect object is stated for clarification, right? Since "me" is the only object pronoun that appears, it must be functioning as the i.o. pronoun. Further, the personal "a" is used only with direct objects; therefore, "la esposa" must be functioning as the direct object. Both factors indicate the correct translation of the sentence is: "He presented/introduced his wife to me.". In order to make the Duolingo "correct" response actually correct, it would need to be "Él le me presentó a su esposa," would it not? Clarification from a native-speaker would be so helpful here!

9
Reply33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

This is an interesting point about the need for a redundant pronoun before the verb if "su esposa" is to be considered as the indirect object.

Perhaps the issue is that in the case of introducing people, it doesn't really make any difference which way round we say it, in either English or Spanish, so the way we choose to translate it depends more on ease of understanding or sentence rhythms.

In English, it feels more natural to me to say "he introduced me to X" than to say "he introduced X to me", but perhaps there could be contexts where this is not so.

5
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dekakaruk
Dekakaruk
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Yes, personal 'a' is used only for direct objects, but it not necessarily is personal 'a'. It can be 'a' meaning "to". What confuses me is that I also heard that indirect object pronouns are necessary even when we use real direct object noun. And even more confusing is that I'm unable to find any sources about such a requirement at the moment. Also I could propose yet third possible meaning: "Whom he introduced him to?" "He introduced to me, his wife". I hope there are some native speakers to clarify it.

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dofn2

To clarify this notion for people:

The personal a is only used with a direct object (with no exceptions, as far as I am aware); hence you can infer that the me attached to presentó must be an indirect object pronoun.

I guess the ambiguity could come when we say this is not a personal a, but with used as 'to' with a direct object me pronoun (He introduced his wife to me), but as far as I can tell, they use a different construction. I think a native will need to clarify this.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinnmel
tinnmel
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The personal a is used when a person is either the direct or the indirect object. In Doulingos accepted answer, they have the esposa as the indirect object and me as the direct object. The grammar and sentence structure in this case does not specify which way it has to be. Both, he introduced his wife to me or he introduced me to his wife should be considered correct.

17
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenTkacs

Given that explanation, "he presented me to his wife" should also be correct, but it's the opposite of the correct answer.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Look at tinmell's reply below. me here is the DIRECT OBJECT because it is ME who he introduced to TO HIS WIFE (indirect object).

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuniorPolyglot

same mistake

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluemarimba

That's exactly what I put... and lost a heart. I know that earlier in the "course" DL used this phrasing when translating into "She presented her man...".

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr-Pen
Dr-Pen
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That makes two of us then

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viajero7

that makes 3.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jibbz

Cuatro...

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjordzhenvogh

Cinco.

I think it should be either. 'me' is either indirect or direct and the 'a su esposo' could be direct with the personal 'a' or indirect object.

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrvinegar

Seis

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janne57
janne57
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siete

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua6261

ocho

2
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Audrey5775

Nueve.

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
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Diez. Two years later! :o (I wonder if everyone else has reported it too)

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdxi
cdxi
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I think it only means "He (él) presented me (me presentó) to his wife (a su esposa)." He said "Wify, this is Buba." etc. What you wrote would suggest saying "Buba, this is my wife".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizzyg0528

I put that too but it didn't except

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busycat
busycat
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The "e" in "esposa" didn’t come out well in the slow version of the audio. Hardly heard it.

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mprdo
mprdo
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Agree. At regular speed: ESPOSA. At turtle speed: 'SPOSA. I'll try to report for 'problem with audio. 27Aug15

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebunny84ppg

Yup!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yes, this exercise somehow slipped past DL's Quality Control system - and continued to do so for at least two years, just like far too many others! So sad. :-(

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jocomo
jocomo
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And the fast version sounds like "presento a", without the ó, so the emphasis is on the second syllable rather than the third.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pezguy
pezguy
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I'm reporting the same issue 25 May 2016.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterJames
PeterJames
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Surely 'He introduced his wife to me' is also correct?

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephErns1

He introduced his wife to me is as grammatically correct (and identical) to He introduced me to his wife. Speaking of the English grammar, that is.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TexMexChica

"He introduced me to your wife." If it's formal, this is right too, isn't it?

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dghkudcbn

Yes, that is what I put. Su can mean your if you use usted or ustedes -su can mean your(formal), your(pl.+formal), his, her, its, and their

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bonifaciu
Bonifaciu
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In slow mode she clearly says "sposa", not "esposa".

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raquilee

He introduced his wife to me os not the same???

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lgriffith89

i report it everytime i have to strengthen this subject

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toggrikk
toggrikk
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I am losing so many points because of poor knowledge of English prepositions. Can you never present somebody "for" someone?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

To first answer your direct question, to "present for" somebody implies that you are presenting /in place of another person/.

Ex: The boss was sick, so I presented to the Board for her.

"Present to" is the meaning we are looking for here-- that you are directing a presentation at someone, or, more simply, that you are speaking to them.

But, honestly, English prepositions are mysterious and cruel creatures, my friend. Besides serving normal prepositional roles in the English language, they double complexity as verb-preposition pairs.

For example, in the English language, "throw out" means to put in the trash, whereas "throw up" is another word for vomit. Then again, when you "throw in," you're putting effort/money towards a cause, but "throw around" is something you do with suggestions. A "throwdown" is another word for a fight, and (OF COURSE) a "throwover" is something you can wear to stay warm in cold weather.

It's just not fair. But it is FUN, once you get used to it :)

Hope this helped more than it hindered.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

This is also a good summary on some basics of English prepositions. http://www.bobgrubic.com/Seminar%20Handout%20Final.pdf

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Catskill-eagle

I wrote "He introduced his wife to me." I think it works either way.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

Why not?? "He introduced me his wife".

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidrosa.tt

He introduced his wife to me ??? Not accepted. Any english speakers feel free to help

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fantasma_Negro82

Ok i put he introduced his wife to me, why is that wrong?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Trash

I put "he introduced his wife to me." Someone tell me that's not wrong! It says it's wrong!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sonja435798

I was so close- I put 'he introduced his wife to me' and was marked wrong. :'(

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SraDPhx
SraDPhx
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When it was my captain, "presented" was ok. Also, "me...a su esposa" can be either "his wife to me" (a personal) or "me to his wife"...

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johnny-jay

How would this be translated to spanish: " He introduced his wife to me."

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xydan

I'm just wondering: if the particle "a" is often used to clarify pronouns, can this sentence be interpreted as "He presented me, his wife?"

Or does this only work for the words "lo/la/le." So would "He presented his wife" be "el la presento a su esposa."

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRodri20

He presented me his wife . . . was wrong, lol (for obvious reasons)

0
Reply3 years ago