Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Salgo mañana."

Translation:I go out tomorrow.

5 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
  • 13
  • 11
  • 2

This seems to be unnatural English sentence. I usually would say: I will go out tomorrow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1007

I'd agree that I probably wouldn't say "Go out tomorrow", but I would say "I leave tomorrow" one of those places where the grammar is correct but the sentence is semantically incorrect and sounds odd.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

I think in Spanish the present tense can be used to describe things that will occur in the immediate future (without requiring the use of the future tense". "They are arriving tomorrow" = "llegan mañana"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyReid

Same as in English, just not for this particular verb. "I leave tomorrow" works, for example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Renagolden

This is correct.. ...to say... I go out tomorrow... is not proper English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnieHayd

Re: Rena goldenberg "I go out tomorrow," may not be grammatically correct but if you live in the US, anywhere near the Midwestern states, you will certainly have to learn what it means to "go out, go up, go down and go over" means, and when it is appropriate to use it, otherwise you will lose something in the translation.
It is difficult for me to believe that we are the only people in the world who use direction, or some other geography or landmark to describe where you are going to or coming from. Here is a story to give you an idea of what I'm talking about.

Becky lived in the city. Her sister, Brenda lived "out" in the country not too far away. Linda, the middle sister, lived "over" on the west end "outside" of town. The three girls had a brother that wanted to help but he lived twenty miles "up" north, too far to be much help. Still a second brother, Darrell, was able to help tremendously becacause he lived right in the center of town. They were able to "drop" in on him for help often!

The words "out, up, over, down, outside " are all used for directional indicators and the word "drop" is simply used to get the idea across that the girls were able to go see their brother quickly, as they may have been near him anyway. All these words are just to help in descibing intentions to do something or go someplace.

I am VERY far from assuming to be grammatically correct. I simply want to say, that in discovering duolingo, learning Spanish, and in reading the comments, it is best to finally let it sink in to our set way of speaking/hearing, that we need to pay attention to what the language we are learning is trying to say. It really doesn't matter how many ways of saying something there is, or even how it should be said, but how it IS being said at various different places. My goal is to understand and to be understood in the dpoken word!
Gracias Rena y gracias duolingo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

One thing to keep in mind is that this exercise is in the lesson for present tense. So, even though it seems awkward, it is probably best to stick with the present for now.

Remember, due to DL's focus on vocabulary, awkward/weird sentences are par for the course.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lunarefiore

I agree with you completely Huysan.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelestapleton

This definitely should be accepted as a reasonable translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moi38595

I will go out tomorrow should be accepted as an appropriate answer

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
DABurnside
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 889

In English, "I go out tomorrow" is highly unlikely but not altogether impossible. You ask a soldier when is he being deployed, and he says..."I go out tomorrow." Someone in the Navy would more likely say, "I ship out tomorrow." Similar thing, I think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobZhurunkle

So many folks bucking at this answer. When do you go out? I go out tomorrow. It's probably not near the top of a list of the most used phrases like what's for breakfast or I am a penguin but it is perfectly fine.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
  • 25
  • 21
  • 8
  • 4
  • 4

I said, "I go out in the morning," but it wasn't accepted. I'm assuming the problem is the lack of 'en' since manana can be either tomorrow or morning. Any thoughts on this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mondorino
mondorino
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 2

as far as i know, the right way to say "in the morning" is "en la mañana"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 3
  • 3

O "por la mañana" it sounds better.

"Salgo de viaje mañana, por la mañana"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felinagrace

Si, that is correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
  • 25
  • 21
  • 8
  • 4
  • 4

Thanks! That helps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lem0nz87

I tried 'I leave tomorrow' and it was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
  • 23
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 6
  • 6
  • 503

Then, it can be both 'I go out tomorrow' and 'I leave tomorrow'...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/revdolphin
revdolphin
  • 25
  • 17
  • 16
  • 10
  • 5

"I am going out tomorrow" was also accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lele3c
Lele3c
  • 20
  • 14
  • 15

The singular instance for which DL accepts present progressive for simple present?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Duo has got me writing bad English in order to play safe. We would say 'I am going out' here given the time reference...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

"I go out tomorrow," is different from, "I go tomorrow" - but where is the 'out' in this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

It's implied in one of the definitions of "salir" - "to go out"

6th one down on this list, but it's a very common translation: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=salir

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

Thank you. I'm still not entirely convinced that duo shouldn't accept 'I go tomorrow' or 'I leave tomorrow'. In English, 'I go out tomorrow' is slightly odd.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1007

I believe it accepts I leave.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rchassereau

I keep on mixing "Saltar" and "Salir". Saltar = to jump, and Salir = to leave

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

I put "I leave in the morning" Isn't Salir the verb to leave

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1007

Salir is to leave, to go out. But in this sentence, manana is tomorrow. In the morning would be en la manana or por la manana.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StefanoRub1
StefanoRub1
  • 24
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 10
  • 127

"i exit tomorrow" may be not too beautiful to pronounce, but it is correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1007

Exit needs something to exit from, an object of some sort. I exit the state tomorrow (weird, but grammatical). Not correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjepm

I used the same words but switched them around .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardSheehan

why not "leae?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeWallen1

I go tomorrow or I leave tomorrow seem like good translations

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lithium91w

I put I'LL go out tomorrow... seems pretty reasonable to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CristianMo104611

I am out tomorrow,¿ Por que sale mal ?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AttilioTac3

correct : I'll leave tomorrow

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentaPoole

I don't think the "out" is necessary. In English if asked "When do you go?" I would answer, "I go tomorrow" My answer should be accepted.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterJacks144506

The best translation is I will go out tomorrow. I go out tomorrow is clumsy and is the kind of thing a non-native English speaker would say

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodyWarrin

Why not I'll go out tomorrow?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolante9

tomorrow is FUTURE, okay to say in Spanish :go out, but in English it is :will go out.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisjordan22

Should be in the future tense saldre ( can`t do accents). But this lesson is all in the present to cater for people who havnt done the future. This is irritating for people who have, apart from being wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1007

This is actually to several comments above. In Spanish, and also in English, we speak about the future using the present tense plus an adverb ALL THE TIME. It is very common to say something like - We leave for our vacation next week or I am cooking dinner at six o'clock tonight. Same with Spanish. That is what this sentence is trying to teach you.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry182846
Barry182846
  • 25
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 172

I translated it as I go out tomorrow but felt I had to stick will in to make it grammatically correct. As Duo is always telling me I don't speak my language properly its nice to catch them making a mistake for a change.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

"i exit tomorrow" should also be accepted. reported june 28, 2018

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CassyBaker
CassyBaker
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 187

This is just weird. If you hold the cursor up to the word "salgo" it says "(I) leave". If you type I leave tomorrow, it says WRONG. I go out tomorrow means something entirely different. If you're a cowboy going on a cattle run you could say, "I'll ride out tomorrow", or "I'll head out tomorrow." I don't know any cowboys. Do you?

2 months ago