"Han går efter mig."

Translation:He walks after me.

January 13, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/moore.scott24

Sometimes it seems like swedish is just english with a swedish accent

January 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/supu1

Interesting article but it forgets to say that about half of the english words are of latin origin (even in this article). But it is true that the structure of the sentences is much more similar to the skandinavian languages than the german, dutch ones.

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tinyset

Another creepy Swedish sentence from DL!

January 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkLordBaudish

this type of sentences makes my vision of Sweden darker and weirder

January 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LingoLaura

can this also mean (like in english) he chases?

January 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlotteN7

It could if he is walking while chasing you. .. sort of a slow chase but

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rik894512

That's why I would translate this as 'he is walking behind me', unless it is meant as chasing or otherwise 'walking later then'. I guess they are all correct translations, but with a different meaning that has to become clear in the context?

October 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TomDzeri

So he walks behind me is not correct?

January 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LingoLaura

correct, somebody can walk after I do, but not necessarily be behind me. He could be walking after me the next day or something.

January 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TomDzeri

Thanks

February 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/seventwelve81

I have the same question. In English, this sentence can describe someone walking behind another. Does this exist in Swedish?

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Yes, behind would be bakom.

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/quietmint

I'm still confused by some conflicting discussion above. In English this sentence is ambiguous. Can efter in Swedish also mean both "later" (time) and "behind" (direction), or does it only refer to time?

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CutePorcupine

It could be after in time or space, but it's not the same as behind. He could be walking right after me in a [walking] race or could be walking the same path after his ancestor decades later. Who knows?

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/bigswedeej

So eftrr would be more of sa time factor, where bakom eoild be more physical space?

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/FlorianHermans

In other sentences går could be translated as leaving. Would this also apply here?

October 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Yes, that should be accepted, I'll add it.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kiloutou007

Could this be used to mean "he's going after me" in the sense of eg. he is persecuting me/attacking me?

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelGlad

Am I hearing correctly that the "r" in "efter" almost gets dropped mid-sentence, Boston accent style?

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GodiSandra

Can the sentence be translated as "He folows me."?

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GenevieveLaurin

I really don't understand the context in which one would use this sentence. He is trying to catch up with me? He comes after me (as in a race?). Could a native Swedish speaker (or someone fluent) give me an example, please?

January 29, 2019
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