Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"I just bought a hundred kilos of potatoes."

Translation:Je viens d'acheter cent kilos de pommes de terre.

5 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/louisrafael
louisrafael
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

"J'ai juste acheté cent kilos de pommes de terre." Should be accepted, no?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistaF
mistaF
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

No it should not. When juste means just, it means just as in only. Like "I just want to do this." In French, to say I just did something you say Je viens de.... which literally means I am coming from.... which in essence means the same thing as I just....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

And in English, "I only bought xyz" is a perfectly acceptable reading of "I just bought xyz". So would "j'ai juste acheté" be acceptable with that meaning?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistaF
mistaF
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

Yeah I believe so. You could also say "J'ai seulement acheté"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
quis_lib_duo
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 1780

I think so, yes, thus reported it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/campbellmarsden

I don't understand this translation. 'I come of to buy' ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chen10
chen10
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3

It's another set phrase in French - venir de + infinitive means to have just done something.

Je viens de rencontrer mes copines - I have just met my friends

I hope that makes sense :))

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistaF
mistaF
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

To add, "Je viens de" literally means I am coming FROM (not "of" as OP assumed), so "je viens d'acheter" literally means "I am coming from buying", which more or less means the same thing as "I just bought."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

Reminds me of the Irish English expression "I'm just after (doing sth)".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimSCasey

it didn't till you explained it chen10 thank you! A lingot for you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jason207131

Shouldn't "Je viens d'acheter une centaine de kilos de pommes de terre" be accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Only if the sentence where "about a hundred".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fraserbooks

I know it sounds strange in English but de can mean from as well as of I come from buying ..... It is a way to cope if you don't know the past tenses yet.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrwdunham

"Je viens juste d'acheter cent kilos de patates" should also be accepted. "Patates" is common in Québecois french and "venir juste de V+INF" is basically equivalent to "venir de V+INF", non?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JC70
JC70
  • 17
  • 14
  • 11
  • 7
  • 5

I seem to remember being told that 'patates' is only ever an obscenity in Parisian French.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
  • 24
  • 14
  • 13
  • 5
  • 783

Duolingo does not accept Québecois French, in most cases.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LIMEYFRUIT

jachetais justement cent kilos de pommes de terre. Is this anywhere near passable in french as Id forgot about "venir de"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Basilious

"I only bought" (J'achetais justement) is different from "I just bought" (Je viens d'achete).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilla59
chilla59
  • 25
  • 19
  • 10

A verb construction used to express recent past - see

http://french.about.com/od/grammar/g/recentpast.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth2
DanRoth2
  • 19
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 71

C'est beacoup de pommes de terre.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhoenixThrasher

Who buys a hundred kilos of potatoes?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
  • 24
  • 14
  • 13
  • 5
  • 783

A restaurant chef, the buyer for a supermarket or a school lunchroom...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/campbellmarsden

Thanks everyone for the explanation!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdrc22

Isn't this literal translation, "I came from/of buying 100 kilos of potatoes"
I said, "j'acheté justement cent kilos de pommes de terre" How far off am I?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louisrafael
louisrafael
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

well that verb form doesn't exist - it's either "j'ai acheté" or "j'achetais" - so missing an "avoir" form to say the least. "Justement" means justly, not just in the sense that is provided here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

Why is "d'acheter un cent kilos" not acceptable for one hundred?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeiDeTaiwan

cent means one hundred already

you can view it like this:

Deux cents = 2 X one hundred.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

Mm, I am aware of that, I swore I saw 100 written as both cent and un cent on here before though. Thank you for the very prompt reply.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saccarozy
saccarozy
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

Je viens d'acheter une centaine de kilos de pommes de terre, not accepted??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sophieg18
sophieg18
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8
  • 5

"Une centaine" technically means "around/about 100". I would just play it safe and say "Je veins d'acheter cent kilos de pommel de terre. There are too many right answers, honestly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edlawit

wouldnt the correct answer be 1 because frites are made of potatoes. i dont know im kinda new

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
  • 24
  • 14
  • 13
  • 5
  • 783

We don't see the question you had, and the sentence might have been presented to us in a different way, so I'm not 100% sure that what I think you're saying is what you're saying. BUT.

If what you're saying is that you should have been able to pick a sentence that said "frites" instead of "pommes de terre," then no. Fries are indeed made of potatoes, but if someone asked you to buy potatoes at the supermarket, and you bought fries instead, they would probably not be happy. (Maybe they were making potato salad, or baked potatoes, or mashed potatoes. Fries don't work.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qpqpqpzhang

hello, why not "je viens d'acheter cent kilos de LA pommes de terre."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaMagu2

j'ai compris

1 year ago