"He brings the children."

Translation:Han tar med sig barnen.

January 13, 2015

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Coreopsis2943

So "tar med sig" is another one of those set phrases, meaning "bring"? (Meaning literally "takes with himself"?)

January 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

Yes, exactly.

January 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund

How would you translate "He takes the children (and leaves)"?

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

You can use the same phrase: Han tar med sig barnen och går.

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/WuliyasuHe

Can i say: han tar barnen med sig?

March 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Yes.

March 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/zgz.

I accidentally wrote "Han tar med barnen." and it was accepted. So can we omit "sig" and have the same meaning?

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Yes.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dksvenska

I made the same mistake as above which was accepted ("han tar med barnen") - can you elaborate on why it is acceptable in this instance? Also, does it sound unusual if when speaking to a Swede one omits the sig? Or does it sounds equally "normal"? Thank you.

July 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Both sound perfectly common and normal. No real nuance in meaning.

July 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/edo_farias

What about "föra" ?

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

No, that doesn't really work. That's better for things that are brought with him as a consequence of him coming.

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Spiritfire

I know that this is probably one of those instances of getting used to the way a foreign language works, but I still have a question about this one.

It seems like a direct translation into English is "He takes with himself the children", and then translating that into more common English speech: "He takes the children with him". Is there a more direct way that one says, "He brings the children." rather than "He takes the children with him"?

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

No, there isn't a more direct way to say He brings the children, this is the most natural and simplest way of saying it.

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tredjedotter

takes seems to insinuate going away rather than coming to, like bring is

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

But it commonly means "bring" anyways.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KaBa07

How do you distinguish between he brings the children and he takes the children with him?

April 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Contextually. :)

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/martin.mk

Could anybody please write the whole sentence with the phonetic alphabet, or at least give us an approximation of what it should sound like when you put the stress on "med"? Should it sound like "tar médsej", or something like that?

An audio example would be even better (because I think the TTS is not really getting it right).

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

You're right, the audio is bad here. It should sound like "tar mésej", we usually don't pronounce the d in med.

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nicolastekar

why barnen and not barnet??

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

barn is an ett word.
singular: ett barn, barnet
plural: barn, barnen

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Haesselmaas

One of the other sentences "han har barnen med sig" seems to be a very close translation too. True, it doesn't include that he actually "brings" them, but it's heavily implied, isn't it??

November 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Yes.

November 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ImanMirzaeian

Han hämtar barnen. Is it right?

August 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

There's a difference in perspective. hämta is like 'fetch' in English. Han hämtar barnen means 'he picks up the children' or 'he gets the children' – he goes somewhere and takes the children from there. Maybe his kids are in preschool and he goes there to pick them up.

Han tar med sig barnen only means that he is taking the children along. Maybe the whole family is at home and he is going somewhere with the kids. He doesn't hämta them because they are already where he is.

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ImanMirzaeian

Tack så jätte mycket :)

September 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

"jättemycket" is just one word. Us Swedes love our compound words.

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KaBa07

Sorry but your not germans: Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

It's not a competition, mate. Both languages can and do form long compounds. :)

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaBliss

If children is "barn" too, why "han tar med sig barn" is wrong ?

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

The word works like this:
ett barn 'a child'
barnet 'the child'
barn 'children'
barnen 'the children'

If you just put barn, that'll mean 'children' – not 'the children', just 'children'.

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaBliss

Oh Lord..yeah.. back to basics..lol! What was I thinking? Thank you Arnauti :-)

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EnricoVerg4

Why not "har på sig" ?

May 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

Because that would mean he's wearing the children.

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/BUYT_

I'm halfway through the Swedish tree and it's the first time I see this kind of exercise. Is that normal?

May 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

That's hard to tell. What exercise was it? The forum threads cover multiple ones.

May 17, 2019
Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.