"En borger."

Translation:A citizen.

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ZL321
ZL321
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So that's where borgmester comes from!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissEdith
MissEdith
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I actually think it both comes from the danish word for castle/fortress "borg", so it would littreally be master of the castle/fortress. The internet tells me, it comes from the german word "Bürgermeister"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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To close this (even if a little late): borger where the people who lived in and around a borg, and borgmester seemed to have been either the master/leader of the castle-dwellers, or the lord of the castle himself.
The same counts for the German words Burg, Bürger, and Bürgermeister.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larry837513

And in english place named burgh and borough

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larry837513

And in english place names burgh and borough

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyclOrBit
CyclOrBit
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In Italian the word to define a district is "Borgo" , it was used in older time to refer to villages.

It comes from the latin "burgus", I guess that the German word comes from here too.

The only difference is that in Italian it's not used to refer to citizenship, except for the word "in Borghese" (wearing plain clothes) or "Borghesia" (the middle class of society).

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/borgo

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eduardosemprebon

I wonder how many years it will take me to distinguish borger and boger pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adammurad
adammurad
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I can't believe i wrote a burger

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyclOrBit
CyclOrBit
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Freudian lapsus? ;-)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wojo4hitz
wojo4hitz
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So cute how these all come from castles...oh, Europe!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerhaneHag

Ja, jeg er i borgmester hassings vej nu!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/googlenka
googlenka
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Similar to German - Der Bürger :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristineR860145

Then does this mean that the English translation for the Danish political program "Borgen" is "The Citizen". All this time I thought it must have been someone's name.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christhroup
christhroup
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Borgen means "The Castle", but it refers to Christiansborg Palace where the Danish Government sit. It's similar to Westminster referring to the British Government (which sits in the Palace of Westminster).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cody883261

Hvad er forskellen mellem "borger" og "statsborger?" Måske er den så - Jeg er en statsborger af Danmark og en borger af København?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Ja, din idé er god. :)
Borger er simpelt et generelt begreb, mens statsborger vedrører landet, som du lever i.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cody883261

Mange tak! Lige nu er jeg glad for, at jeg studerede tysk - så mange ligheder! :D

1 year ago
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