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  5. "On Monday to Friday."

"On Monday to Friday."

Translation:Dé Luain go Dé hAoine.

January 13, 2015

18 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bryji

The English sentence is 'on Monday to Friday' but the irish does not include 'ar', seems wrong, is it?

March 15, 2015

[deactivated user]

    Dé Luain can be 'Monday' or 'On Monday'.

    May 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimMcGuire4

    I just spaced out the Dé. Cuz there's no rhyme or reason for me learning this yet. Sometimes it's with or without, and it's on the day or just the day in English,it doesn't matter. but I'm confused, it's all good, I'll learn it,I'll get it! Albeit frustrating as shite!!!

    May 22, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

    Same wonder here. :D

    July 7, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaclavH

    In other question they would not repeat dé for the other day so i wonder

    January 13, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oopsdaisy13

    And in the last question I answered they wrote Monday as 'Luan' - would the 'i' mean this should be Mondays? Getting a bit confused ...

    January 31, 2016

    [deactivated user]

      The 'i' is because is followed by the genitive case.
      Luan = nominative case, e.g. an Luan
      Luain = genitive case, e.g. Dé Luain.
      Luanta = Mondays

      May 5, 2016

      [deactivated user]

        From Monday to Friday, Ó Luan go hAoine seems more natural in both languages.

        May 5, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alayah546008

        Hard if you don't now but why would it have go in it

        June 12, 2017

        [deactivated user]

          Go here means "to" or "until".
          See meaning number 3 here for go.

          June 12, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niall304641

          A good rule of thumb I have noticed is that when faced with certain prepositions (particularly those including the fada) there appears to be a genetive case. There are exceptions but I think there is a trend here but all the studying still isnt revealing the very special cases.

          September 8, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
          Mod
          • 1216

          isn't a preposition.

          Prepositions that were originally nouns, and "derived preposition" that consist of a noun and a preposition trigger the genitive, because a noun after a noun is usually in the genitive.
          http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/genpraep.htm

          Fadas don't come into it.

          September 8, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyihsin

          I put "Dé Luain go dtí Dé hAoine" and Duo called it wrong. Is it really wrong with the "dtí" in there?

          January 1, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
          Mod
          • 1216

          It's good enough for Oifig na Gaeilge Ollscoil Mhá Nuad, so you it should be good enough for Duolingo!

          Is iad uaireanta oibre na hoifige ná: Dé Luain go dtí Dé Céadaoin 9r.n. go 5.30i.n.

          January 5, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CEricFunst

          Why is "Ar an Dé Luain go Dé hAoine" not correct?

          April 27, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
          Mod
          • 1216

          For much the same reason that you don't say "the a man" in English - and ar an can't both be applied at the same time.

          April 27, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CEricFunst

          But, apparently I'm wrong, I thought the "Dé" in this case was a part of the name of the day .... Thanks.

          April 27, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JC_123456789

          Stop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post Comment

          September 21, 2016
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