"Non ho fame, però voglio una caramella."

Translation:I am not hungry, but I want a piece of candy.

July 28, 2013

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sander2701

it's like I hear my son talking

July 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aliceuh

Is it used in the same cases as "ma" ?

August 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/chatee

Yes it is.

December 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aliceuh

Thanks !

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/halleysuisei

I was asking my Italian friend (who lives in northern Italy) about the difference between ma and pero, and he had some long explanation (which I don't exactly remember since we were busy walking) but I think he was basically saying they are not exactly the same (something like pero is used in a more specific way than ma)...

January 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/halleysuisei

Oh, so I think the bottom line (if I heard my friend correctly) was that you can't really do any harm using 'ma,' so just use that when in doubt.

January 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

This is godawful English. It's either "a piece of candy" or "candy". You can say "a sweet" (if you're British), but American English does not use "candy" as a countable noun. I can't believe this hasn't been addressed in 3 years.

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ashlward

"I want candy" was not accepted. Why?

November 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

Because the Italian was very distinctly 'una caramella' - A sweet/candy. It might be slightly easier for those of us coming from the brit side where we think of sweets as individual items (I want a sweet) rather than the more general (I want candy)

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jjshabadoo

Maybe they should use the word sweet then. Want a candy sounds silly.

June 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

Except I believe to the USA folks a candy is a sweet. The wonders of local dialects and idioms.

June 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jholland15

20 lingots, from america with love

November 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark981416

...

January 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jones_Rick

The English right answer is not natural. No native speaker would ever say that.

November 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/LuizQueved0

Unless it is a child...who knows :D

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chris.stan2

I said "I would like a candy" and got it wrong. It says its "I want a candy". I dont see the difference. And the way i put it was nicer.

March 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Flippi273

"Voglio" is translated as "I want" if you want to say "I would like" you need to use "vorrei" I believe it's called the subjunctive case.

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/eott55

Subjunctive is a mood. This would be the conditional case. Other than that spot on m8

December 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

Well, I haven't got to it in Italian yet, but certainly the French for I want (je veux) is different from I would like (je voudrais). The way you put it might have been nicer. But it was not correct. If you are learning the language, you will need to be able to distinguish between I want and I would like. If only because if you try using Italian and use the 'I want' where you would like to use the 'would like' you may appear rude. Doing a little checking shows that I would like a candy is 'Vorrei una caramella'.

March 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Nic.monks

I agree

November 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Nic.monks

I agree would like is much more acceptable

December 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jones_Rick

"I want a candy is incorrect" I want a piece of candy or I want some candy is correct.

November 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/dxrsam

Candy is also a countable noun as far as I know. Wiktionary: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/candy.

February 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/KarlYoung2

Però vs ma. Anyone know when to use either or does it make no difference?

January 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/KarlYoung2

While we're at it how about bensi too

January 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JolaDzoku

Literally me

August 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ella_Wren

You can never be too full for candy ;D

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ella_Wren

Well, maybe sometimes..... but not very often.

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Lonneke5SOS

This sums me up pretty well

February 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Gomer_Pyle

You can actually feel this way. After eating the same thing for a bit, your brain gets kind of bored of the food you're eating, so it seems like you're full. But when it sees something new it realises that it is still hungry, so the 'dessert compartment' in your stomach is technically real.

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/OHHHHTHATSABINGO

We call them lollies in the land down unda

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/charlotte_lyle

I wrote I am not hungry but want a candy and was marked wrong. I was thinking that I want a candy is implied. No?

January 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TinaPhelps

"I wrote, "I am not hungry, but still I want a candy." I think pero implies nevertheless, and yet, or but still. Why else preface "I want a candy" with "I am not hungry.

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Nub.Shiggurath

Glad I wasn't the only one who thought along those lines.

July 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GordonAlla1

I don't see why caramel is wrong. A caramel is a piece of candy in the UK.

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

Because while all caramels are candy (in the USA) (or in other english speaking locales 'sweets' (UK) or 'lollies' (Australia)), not all candy are caramels. Caramella is used for any type of candy, not just caramels.

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Pleijaden94

Could it not be "I am not hungry, still I want a candy" ?

October 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

No. "Still" is "ancora", and that would have to be two sentences in English.

October 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Villi2611

Why are there so many words for 'but'?

December 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyB17

sweet is English for American piece of candy so should be accepted

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyB17

would like is synonymous with want in this context

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

Not exactly. The Italian for "I would like" is "vorrei" (you'll get to it in the section on the conditional). It's a more polite phrasing than this, and while it may carry a similar meaning, it's not an accurate translation of "voglio".

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyB17

but we are talking about what is right in an English context not Italian and in English they are usually synonymous

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

Again, not really. "I want candy," and "I would like candy," carry similar meanings, but they are not interchangeable. Similarly, you couldn't translate this as "I should like a piece of candy", "I desire candy", or "I wish for candy," even thought all those words are synonymous with "want".

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyB17

I'm sorry. As a native English speaker and as an journalist and editor I would differ but let's leave it there

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeArilotta

I'm glad I wasn't the only one.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Juliane553272

here ist the translation correct, but not in the lesson

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/bodybybagelbites

aaaaand that's why i'm fat lol

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacqueline605784

This is the most useful Italian phrase I've learned so far.

August 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa819902

Story of my life.

September 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GidiZisk

If someone say this in a colloquial way (like a child), would he use però or ma? Is però colloquial enough?

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelTrim5

Isn't però more close to "though" than "but" which is represented by ma? correct me if I'm wrong I just wanna know why I got the question wrong.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

It's more like "however" in this context, but you're right that it carries a stronger meaning than "ma," which I think would be more appropriate for the given sentence.

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/wolf1mtb

"Un pezzo" is "a piece." Voglio una caramelle = I want a candy. Sure, the thought is the same; but, the translation is incorrect.

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

Except "I want a candy" is bad English. It would be redundant (and probably confusing) to say "un pezzo di caramella" in Italian, in the same way that it would be confusing to say "a candy" in English. In both instances, the speaker would be indicating a lack of fluency.

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/wolf1mtb

Ciao nevevarine1138! Actually, 'I want a candy" is not bad English; particularly, if you have a box of candies from which to choose one. The Speaker can actually emphasize "a" to reflect they only want one candy. Nonetheless, my point is DL infers a great deal with its translations. Think of it this way: Isn't there a difference between referring to a cloth and only a piece of cloth? DL needs to teach specifics to new learners and then go into variations of context. I know where DL is going, but too often it confuses folks. I really have to check out how DL teaches English!

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/nerevarine1138

I don't know how else to put it, but no. "I want a candy" is not correct for the same reason "I want two candies" is not correct. You quantify "candy" by modifying it with "piece." This exercise was actually updated to reflect that the prior "I want a candy" version of the translation was not good English.

Now, if you're British, you might say that you want "a sweet," but that's a different word.

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/wolf1mtb

You expressed your thought perfectly. And I do follow your reasoning. However, I think your overlooked my point on situational contest. Candy can be an uncountable mass; the word itself used as either singular or plural. But, if several pieces are available, one might articulate stress on the "a" to reflect the desire for only one of the pieces; thus, wanting only "a candy" rather than many pieces. I appreciate our dialogue on grammar and the substance of context.

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/rondicostanzo

"I wish a candy" is wrong - "I wish a candy" is right. Stupidaggini!

July 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KarlYoung2

I just Google translated "stupidaggini". Hilarious!

January 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

"I wish a candy" is not correct English.

November 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ASamyA

My answer should be accepted as (has a typo). I wrote "hungary" instead of "hungry"

February 7, 2017
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