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"Ellos se llevan a sus hijos."

Translation:They take his children away.

5 years ago

73 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/fiksu-

From http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/llevar.htm :

Once upon a time, the Spanish verb llevar meant primarily to carry a heavy burden. However, it has become one of the most flexible verbs in the language, used not only in discussing what a person carries, but also what a person wears, has, does, tolerates or moves. As a result, it isn't always easy to tell what llevar means out of context. To make matters worse, it also is a part of a number of idiomatic phrases that don't seem to have a lot to do with carrying.

Here are a number of examples of llevar in use, along with possible translations.

llevar (algo) — to carry (something) — No puedo llevar nada más. I can't carry anything else.

llevar, llevar encima — to have on one's person — En ese momento me di cuenta de que no llevaba dinero encima. At that moment I realized that I didn't have any money on me.

llevar (algo) — to take or move (something) — Voy a llevar los platos al sótano. I'm going to take the dishes to the basement.

llevar (algo) — to tolerate, cope or deal with (something) — Lleva muy bien las derrotas. He puts up with defeat very well.

llevar (algo or a alguien) — to transport (something or someone) — Pedro nos llevó al aeropuerto. Pedro took us to the airport.

llevar (ropa o estilo) — to wear (clothing or style), to sport (a type of clothing or style) — No es necesario llevar el sombrero. It isn't necessary to wear your hat. Ha decidido llevar la barba. He has decided to sport a beard.

llevar (ingrediente) — to have or include (an ingredient) — A mi madre le gusta todo lo que lleva chocolate. My mother likes anything with chocolate in it.

llevar a (algo) — to lead to (something) — La mediación papal llevó a la paz entre Argentina y Chile. The pope's mediation led to peace between Argentina and Chile. Me llevó a creer que es inteligente. She led me to believe she is intelligent.

llevar (un vehículo) — to drive (a vehicle) — Llevó el coche a Madrid. She drove the car to Madrid.

llevar (una organización o una empresa) — to direct, run or lead (an organization or business) — Ingrid lleva la tienda de artesanía. Ingrid runs the artists' store.

llevar (un nombre) — to bear (a name) — Una calle de Candelaria lleva el nombre de José Rodríguez Ramírez. A Candelaria street bears the name of José Rodríguez Ramírez.

llevar cuenta — to keep account — ¿Quién lleva cuenta del resultado? Who's keeping track of the score?

llevar (tiempo) — to last (time) — Llevo meses diciendo que hay metodologias alternativas. I've been saying for months there are other ways. Llevo tres días sin dormir. I've gone three days without sleeping.

llevar (dinero) — to charge (money) — El revendedor me llevó mucho dinero por los boletos. The scalper charged me a lot of money for the tickets.

para llevar — "to go" (as in takeout food) — Quisiera dos hamburguesas para llevar. I'd like two hamburgers to go.

llevarse — to get along with — Nos llevamos bien. We get along well together. No se lleva bien con su madre. He doesn't get along well with his mother. Este año se lleva bien los pantalones cortos. Short pants are in style this year.

llevarse (algo) — to take (something) — Llévatelo. Take it with you. Quisiera llevarme la flor. I'd like to take the flower with me.

llevarse (algo) — to receive or win (something) — Se llevó el premio Nobel. She won the Nobel prize.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David1945

This is really helpful, thank you. In fact there is an english word that has many of these meanings: to bear

They bear many gifts (bring, carry) They bare a heavy burden, a responsibility, a curse etc. They bear off (take away, remove) They bear children (give birth to) They bear the mark of Cain (show, demonstrate -symbolic) They bear good tidings (bring) He bears a message

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LewisH65
LewisH65
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Thank you very much, this will definitely help me in the future!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0xFEE1DEAD

'to bear' works but for me the word that immediately came to mind was 'to carry'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naunet27

how do I give you a lingot? oh, I don't have any, sorry!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ashley394144

Also run. I think run has the most definitions in english. I run around the track. The fridge is running. Ive been running around all day. Lets run some tests, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410
Kama410
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Wow! To bear is a GREAT translation in so many ways!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

Thanks. That's interesting. I quit about halfway through the list, hoping that "to take, carry, have or wear" will cover most usage! Trying to remember just that much looks like enough at this point. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HabisY

how do we save comments? this is gold. Have a lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

In a browser, save it as a bookmark.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharituamiga

Many thanks. Your info is a great help to me. Was confused. :-/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rexdexter
rexdexter
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Thanks - I think

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Typ1cality

Almost like the English verb take if you think about it

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yanis_shah
Yanis_shah
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It seems to have the same meaning of the french "Porter" and derivatives (apporter, supporter)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadia688832

and where is "take away" meaning here? It's impossible for a beginner to translate that correctly without context

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Rats. I was so proud of myself for remembering that llevarse means "to get along with" that I didn't notice "a" instead of "con". So I put "They get along well with his children." A harsh lesson (I don't think I have enough hearts to get to the end), but a good one.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cerrida

I did the same thing! I also tapped out on this question and didn't realize why.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chopkins906

What would be the difference between "Ellos se llevan a sus hijos" and "Ellos los llevan a sus hijos" ? This reflexive verb stuff is baffling to me...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

Llevarse + (object) = to take (something) away (from a place) Ella se llevó el coche.

Llevarse + a + (person or pet) = to take a (person or pet) away (from a place) Ella se llevó sus hijos sin pedirles permiso (She took their children away without asking for permission)

The reflexive form does not mean in this case to "himself", "themselves" or any "self". Some verbs when in the reflexive form and/or in combination with another word can simply have a different meaning as a whole.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive

..has the effort in trying to cram this through your skull got anyone else singing "THEY'RE COMING TO TAKE ME AWAY!! HO HO HEE HEE HA HA" yet?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

So where does the "away" come from? It accepted my answer of "They take their children," but I was actually thinking of a couple taking their children along on a trip, which apparently is not at all the meaning intended. Is this an idiom, or am I missing something?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

Llevarse + (object) = to take (something) away (from a place) Ella se llevó el coche.

Llevarse + a + (person or pet) = to take a (person or pet) away (from a place) Ella se llevó sus hijos sin pedirles permiso (She took their children away without asking for permission)

The reflexive form does not mean in this case to "himself", "themselves" or any "self". Some verbs when in the reflexive form and/or in combination with another word can simply have a different meaning as a whole.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

But as far I can understand, that explanation really doesn't necessarily make my interpretation wrong. The couple takes their children away from home on vacation, after all, and the pronoun is quite ambiguous--no way to tell whose children we're talking about, really. I guess what I'm trying to ask is...Does it necessarily mean that someone else took their children?

To clarify, in your first example, does the sentence imply that she took away another person's car? Is this the implication? Or does it just mean that she took the car rather than the pickup when she drove to the store?

Sorry, I'm not trying to be difficult, just trying to understand if there is a particular connotation I should be aware of.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brione
brionePlus
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I think that in this case 'se' is being used reflexively: it's signifying that Ellos, the subject, is also the object of the sentence: They take away his children (themselves).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

Llevarse + (object) = to take (something) away (from a place) Ella se llevó el coche.

Llevarse + a + (person or pet) = to take a (person or pet) away (from a place) Ella se llevó sus hijos sin pedirles permiso (She took their children away without asking for permission)

The reflexive form does not mean in this case to "himself", "themselves" or any "self". Some verbs when in the reflexive form and/or in combination with another word can simply have a different meaning as a whole.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chicacr

And that was my answer but was not approved. :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
Caversham
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Rats indeed! Completely baffled. I put They take their children which was accepted for some strange reason. But where does the "his" come from??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"sus" means his, or her, or their, or your (usted or ustedes).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
Caversham
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Thanks. Of course - I should have known that! :-(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Perhaps "They take their children" is acceptable because the "se llevan" is reflexive (They themselves take their children) and "llevan" is being used as a transitive verb (i.e., taking "children" as an object).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

Llevarse + (object) = to take (something) away (from a place) Ella se llevó el coche.

Llevarse + a + (person or pet) = to take a (person or pet) away (from a place) Ella se llevó sus hijos sin pedirles permiso (She took their children away without asking for permission)

The reflexive form does not mean in this case to "himself", "themselves" or any "self". Some verbs when in the reflexive form and/or in combination with another word can simply have a different meaning as a whole.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niko.brummer

Llevarse as a transitive verb means to take away or even steal. Llevarse as an intransitive verb means to get along, according to my wordreference dictionary. Do I understand that the preposition a makes it transitive here, but con would make it intransitive?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

I believe it's a personal a. If that is the case, then it is indeed transitive here. I don't know about the "con."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/5teveO
5teveO
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Is this a social services type thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/folioverso

I never asked so many question in Dl discussion. First of all I cant see the explanation on how to use "se" here in DL. The second, why "They take themselves to their children" isn't correct? It doesn't sound normally in English, but I have got quite used to it in DL lessons.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive
  1. the posts above help, or see tips+hints if you're on the website (vs the app which I'm on) or Google it
  2. I'm.. not certain, sorry.
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

The post above has some mistakes. Always check with a native speaker before learning wrong uses that come from internet articles that not declare the source. Suerte!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilgoff

Oops! Completely missed above posts think this section has fried my brain!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valencys

Why isn't they take away their children correct? I thought the reflexive se would be referencing their own children.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saltedlolly

This stuff is so tricky. I wrote "They take it to their children". I don't really see how this is wrong. What would my sentence be in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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My understanding is that "se" is only a pronoun when there's another pronoun after it.According to this http://spanish.about.com/od/pronouns/a/introduction_se.htm, when "se" is before another pronoun, like "se le", it means that the "se" is really "le", because Spanish doesn't put two pronouns together that start with L.

I think your sentence would be "Ellos lo llevan a sus hijos."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

The most common to express that in Spanish is by using doble indirect object.

"Ellos lo llevan a sus hijos" is not how a native would speak.

Natives would say "Ellos se lo llevan a sus hijos"

Se=a sus hijos

If you dont want to repeat info, you would say: "ellos se lo llevan"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cathykirby

This is helpful! Esté es servicial!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xydan

So in this case, the "a sus hijos" isn't a clarification of "lo(s), " but instead it means "to the sons?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dorisann

Your sentence would be. "Ellos lo llevan a sus hijos". No reflexive pronoun. When "llevar" is used with the reflexive pronoun the meaning is more similar to "take away" or "make off with" instead of just "take". Look on WordReference.com

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

Ellos se lo llevan a sus hijos

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rdelbian

I thought llevar could also mean carry? they carry their kids....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

I'm not sure why it wouldn't be. I wonder if this is just a common usage that they want us to be a familiar with?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

It is a very common way natives use the verb llevar :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busycat
busycat
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What's wrong with, "They take to his children"? Someone, please give me a definition?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"take to" is an idiom meaning "form a liking for". "They take to his children" means "They start liking his children".

The "se" in "se llevan" indicates that the verb is "llevarse", not "llevar". "llevarse" means several things depending on both the preposition and the context (see the post by fiksu- in this discussion), but in this case, it means "take away".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super__Suhail

"they take away his children" should be correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatB.

Yes, why isn't "They take away his children" an acceptable answer?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilgoff

Someone my have already mentioned this but why is 'they take away his children' not right? Thanx for help:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamador

I said "They take away his kids," why is it wrong to have the away in a different place?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Hmm, it seems men have the same familial rights in Latin America as they do here in the U.S. lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizabeth.438

So in the translation, what is the difference between "They take away his children" and "They take his children away"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think there's any difference between those. To me, "They take away his children" sounds a bit odd, but I think it's correct, and means exactly the same thing. I see that several people have asked this - I hope people are reporting it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

why isn't there a word for "away"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolirica

PLEASE BEWARE OF POOR WRITTEN ARTICLES WITH MISTAKES explaining grammar that don't mention the source where they got it from. There's a meaning on the article that doesn't seem to be correct, neither in most Latin American countries. "llevar (dinero) — to charge (money) — El revendedor me llevó mucho dinero por los boletos. The scalper charged me a lot of money for the tickets."

I honestly think that is completely incorrect as I have never seen or heard of this example before and I am a Spanish native speaker and I have taught Spanish for 11 years. Unless it is an idiom from a particular region that I am not familiar with, which I doubt. Have anyone heard a native speaker using it like this? If so, where was the person from?

I would suggest to not try to use it like that (as it doesn't make any sense!) until you hear from a native that it is actually correct. Even if it was correct somewhere in the world I would not use as it would be confusing and for most Spanish speakers around the world.

¡Mucha suerte amigos!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacksonst5p3

WHAT

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynMorgan15

Well thats mean.. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken.Coyote

Given a different context than the answer's description, this could also mean: They carry their children.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Odarbey

Gracias for that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leillia
Leillia
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Aaaahhh I thought it was "They carry their children"!! :(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oivind13

Should'nt it be: they take their children away

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jayjaykins

Where does "away" come into this sentence?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PegWhitman
PegWhitman
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I said they take the children. Would away not be understood.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zen-yang

that's sad

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StarlitTardis

So 'llevar' can mean 'bring' and 'take'? In previous lessons it has meant 'bring', in sentences such as 'El lleva jugo al festival' (can't do accents here) but now it means take. That's really confusing.

2 months ago