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"El sábado comerás más sopa que yo."

Translation:On Saturday you will eat more soup than I.

5 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gjdenheijer

... than I will is wrong? I thought this was correct English, or am I mistaking?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

I agree. In North America " .. I will" is more common in conversation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damascus1286

I'm confused as to how we're supposed to know that it means you instead of he/she/etc, given that the hover hints are unclear and I can't seem to find the hint in the context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

There is a mistake in the hints. Comerás means you (tu) will eat.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cemaluslu
cemaluslu
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What is "he/she/it will eat"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatTancock
KatTancock
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comerá

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtDuo
ArtDuo
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gjdenheijer and nohaypan, "...than I will," is very common in North American English, but it is wrong. The vast majority of North Americans do not speak with grammatical correctness.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

ArtDuo, if "You will eat more soup than I will" is incorrect, can you please say why? (Are you saying that the British don't say this?) I gather we agree that "You will eat more soup than I" is acceptable. What about "You will eat more soup than I will eat"? I am trying to guess your rule: Are you saying that it is incorrect to use the auxiliary verb while leaving the main verb in ellipsis?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtDuo
ArtDuo
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The grammatically correct form (and the only one accepted by duoLingo) is, "You will eat more soup than I." I only commented on North American usage, not British. "You will eat more than I will eat" may be grammatically correct, but it is redundant, and therefore not the preferred form - but still better than the often heard, "You will eat more soup than I will." This last sentence repeats the auxiliary verb, but without a main verb, and therefore the auxiliary verb is "dangling," as they say. In the correct sentence, we already know that the comparison refers to eating, but when the auxiliary verb is repeated without a main verb, ambiguity is introduced.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Okay, so I'm giving myself one and a half points for guessing your rule correctly (takes out small notebook) while deducting half a point for wrongly assuming that you were contrasting North American usage with some other part of the world. Because if the whole world has been consistently and commonly using a certain construction for centuries, in speech and writing, it would seem odd to condemn it. (By the way, I realize that last "sentence" is technically a fragment).

Just to remove any doubt, my niece who has spent her life in England and now works as a professional translator for the UN, says that British people commonly do use the dangling auxiliary.

There is no ambiguity. No one will wonder whether I am saying "You will eat more soup than I will drool."

It seems you are ruling out such sentences as, "I have completed more courses than she has" and "David is working harder than I am." In order not to mislead the second-language speakers who may read this exchange, may we say that this is in fact by far the most common way to express these thoughts in speech and in writing. To repeat the main verb is, as you say, unnecessary, and to omit the verb entirely, ending with the pronoun, sounds excessively formal in most situations. I think you are fighting, not a losing cause, but one that is long lost.

But let me amend my "most common" statement in the previous paragraph: In informal speech (perhaps not in writing) it is becoming increasingly common to use the object pronoun after "than," turning "than" into a preposition. Thus, "I have completed more courses than her" and "David is working harder than me." I was schooled out of this practice, which was common enough in the schoolyard, many years ago, and so it grates on my ear now, but respected references are beginning to allow it, and it may be well accepted in another generation or so. And I have no objection to that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tyler.Newton

This was beautifully written.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CassandraB350849

These conjugations are so tough for me...

1 year ago