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"Táim i mo chónaí faoin tuath."

Translation:I am living in the countryside.

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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'Faoin'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

faoi an. Faoin tuath is the colloquial way to say "in the country."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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OK.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eoinmonaghan
eoinmonaghan
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Tuath I beleive was the anciet homestead/village/fort. Faoi = under/about. In other word outside.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiarmuidOS

Very interesting!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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Is she pronouncing "tuath" correctly? It sounds as if there's another syllable/letter at the end (e.g. tuathe?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I would agree. It does sound like she's saying tútha, honestly

Here is the pronunciation from focloir.ie Should be a dipthong there, and no last syllable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bedl0w
Bedl0w
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'down the country' as the normal Irish expression (in English) and should be accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

focloir.ie suggests "faoin tír" for "down the country".
http://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/down

"In the countryside" is a perfectly normal Irish expression too.

But I'm a bit surprised if "I'm living down the country" wasn't accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcEnan1

"down the country" isn't a sensible expression in my local dialect if English (northern Midwest USA).

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bredacm

When I write i mo chonai they say it should be i no chonaigh, and visa versa- How do I know which is which and why?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

no is not a word in Irish. The phrase uses a possessive adjective mo ("my"), do ("your"), a ("his", "her", "their"), ár ("our") or bhur ("your" plural).

Tá mé i mo chónaí .... - "I live in ..."
Tá tú i do chónaí .... - "You live in ..."
Tá sé ina chónaí .... - "He lives in ..."
Tá sí ina cónaí .... - "She lives in ..."
Táimid inár gcónaí .... - "we live in ..."
Tá sibh i(n) bhur gcónaí .... - "You(plural) live in ..."
Tá siad ina gcónaí .... - "They live in ..."

i+a becomes ina. Note how the initial mutation changes after a, and between singular and plural.

If you're getting a screen that tells you that i no is correct, you need to make a screenshot, and submit a bug report.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bredacm

Thank you for your detailed response SatharnPHL, but I'm afraid I misled you in my question. The "no" instead of "mo" was a typo. My question was really about the spelling of "chonai". Sometimes 'chonai" is accepted and sometimes it has to be "chonaigh". And I can't figure out which is correct in what situation.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

cónaigh is a verb. While it is grammatically possible to say chónaigh mé i ... (past tense) that is not the construction that is typically used. I can only find one reference to "chónaigh" when I search Duolingo, and it appears to be a typo (though the Duolingo search engine is pretty useless).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bredacm

Go raibh maith agat aris Satharn.

6 months ago